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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. Search the whole document.

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is suggestion was not acted upon. Lieutenant Chipman was wounded in the left arm, and thirteen enlisted men wounded. At one time that day Colonel Beecher, Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops, who was wounded, came along in rear of our line acting in a dazed sort of way. Fearing he would be killed, Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper sent two men to assist him to the rear. At about 3.40 P. M., Battery F's section was relieved by two of the heaviest naval howitzers under LieutenantCom-mander Matthews. In hauling back the army guns by hand, the One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops lost a number of officers and men. When the naval guns began firing, the sailors worked their pieces in a lively manner on their hands and knees. The enemy's fire slackened at 3.30 P. M. They made no serious attempt to advance at any time; neither did we make further aggressive movement. Preparations were made for retirement at dark by General Potter, who bore himself with conspicuous gallantr
George H. Preble (search for this): chapter 12
York, and Battery A, Third Rhode Island. Capt. George P. Hurlbut, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, had a detachment of his regiment. Admiral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeonre at 2 P. M., and General Potter at 3.30. The latter infused new life into affairs. Small boats were employed to put men ashore. General Potter moved out with the larger part of his brigade about 4 P. M. At the cross-road the general and Commander Preble had a consultation. Concluding that the map furnished was incorrect, and that the Naval Brigade was on the wrong road, General Potter moved the whole force back to the Coosawhatchie cross-road. There the Naval Brigade remained; and Potter'
Edward E. Potter (search for this): chapter 12
l. Our arrival with other troops at Hilton Head was in consequence of General Foster's orders to co-operate with General Sherman in his march to the sea, for the latter had telegraphed General Halleck from Kingston, Ga., November 11,— I would like to have Foster break the Charleston and Savannah Railroad about Pocotaligo about the 1st of December. A force of some five thousand men was gathered at Port Royal and organized as the Coast Division, under command of General Hatch. Gen. E. E. Potter's First Brigade was composed of the Fifty-sixth, One Hundred and Twentyseventh, One Hundred and Forty-fourth and One Hundred and Fifty-seventh New York, Twenty-fifth Ohio, Thirtysecond, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops; Col. A. S. Hartwell's Second Brigade, of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops. Lieut.-Col. William Ames commanded the artillery, consisting of Batteries B and F,
n double column. Twice forced to fall back by the enemy's fire, their brave colonel giving the command, Follow your colors! and himself leading on horseback, the Fifty-fifth turned the bend, rushed up the road, and in the face of a deadly fire advanced to the creek. But it was fruitless, for the pitiless shot and shell so decimated the ranks that the survivors retired after losing over one hundred men in five minutes, including Color Sergeant King, killed, and Sergeant-Major Trotter, Sergeant Shorter, and Sergeant Mitchell, wounded. Colonel Hartwell, wounded and pinned to the ground by his dead horse, was rescued and dragged to the wood by the gallant Lieut. Thomas F. Ellsworth of his regiment. Captains Crane and Boynton were both killed after displaying fearless gallantry. The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New York supported this charge by an advance, but after the repulse retired also. On the right the Twenty-fifth Ohio and Thirty-second United States Colored Troops, swingin
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: Honey Hill. Our arrival with other troops at Hilton Head was in consequence of General Foster's orders to co-operate with General Sherman in his march to the sea, for the latter had telegraphed General Halleck from Kingston, Ga., November 11,— I would like to have Foster break the Charleston and Savannah Railroad about Pocotaligo about the 1st of December. A force of some five thousand men was gathered at Port Royal and organized as the Coast Division, under command of General Hatch. Gen. E. E. Potter's First Brigade was composed of the Fifty-sixth, One Hundred and Twentyseventh, One Hundred and Forty-fourth and One Hundred and Fifty-seventh New York, Twenty-fifth Ohio, Thirtysecond, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops; Col. A. S. Hartwell's Second Brigade, of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops. Lieut.-Col. William Ames commanded the artillery, consistin
Charles E. Tucker (search for this): chapter 12
Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Stevens; Company A, Lieutenant Knowles; Company D, Lieutenant Emerson, commanding, and Lieutenant Hallett; Company I, Lieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a force of twenty-one officers and 540 men. Captains T. L. Appleton and R. H. L. Jewett were on staff duty with General Hatch. A large fleet was ready at Port Royal, the decks of the transports crowded with troops; and the pier at Hilton Head was full of stores and m
James M. Trotter (search for this): chapter 12
ll ordered a charge in double column. Twice forced to fall back by the enemy's fire, their brave colonel giving the command, Follow your colors! and himself leading on horseback, the Fifty-fifth turned the bend, rushed up the road, and in the face of a deadly fire advanced to the creek. But it was fruitless, for the pitiless shot and shell so decimated the ranks that the survivors retired after losing over one hundred men in five minutes, including Color Sergeant King, killed, and Sergeant-Major Trotter, Sergeant Shorter, and Sergeant Mitchell, wounded. Colonel Hartwell, wounded and pinned to the ground by his dead horse, was rescued and dragged to the wood by the gallant Lieut. Thomas F. Ellsworth of his regiment. Captains Crane and Boynton were both killed after displaying fearless gallantry. The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New York supported this charge by an advance, but after the repulse retired also. On the right the Twenty-fifth Ohio and Thirty-second United States Co
James C. Beecher (search for this): chapter 12
difficult to establish the relative time of events, it is believed that these dispositions having been made, the Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops, Col. James C. Beecher, charged up the road. It went forward with a cheer, but receiving a terrible fire, after severe loss, was forced to retire and form in support of the arti dead lying there. I went back, and only two men followed me. Lieutenant Reid and Corp. R. M. Foster of Company C were there killed. Captain Pope joined Colonel Beecher, Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops, in the front battleline, and after nearly an hour, hearing a familiar cheer on the right of the Thirty-fifth, fouould be flanked. His suggestion was not acted upon. Lieutenant Chipman was wounded in the left arm, and thirteen enlisted men wounded. At one time that day Colonel Beecher, Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops, who was wounded, came along in rear of our line acting in a dazed sort of way. Fearing he would be killed, Lieuten
John P. Hatch (search for this): chapter 12
ed as the Coast Division, under command of General Hatch. Gen. E. E. Potter's First Brigade was comnd R. H. L. Jewett were on staff duty with General Hatch. A large fleet was ready at Port Royal,Homans were taken upon the steamer Fraser, General Hatch made the General Hooker his flagship. Oeading to Coosawhatchie and Pocotaligo. General Hatch's flagboat, the Fraser, flying a blue pennmy advancing down. the Grahamville road. General Hatch moved his column at 7.30 A. M., preceded b a heavy fire which drove them to cover. General Hatch, perceiving that the enemy held a strong pt by Col. William T. Bennett, the chief of General Hatch's staff, to whom application was made for manned by sailors reported to me, sent back by Hatch from the main force. I was very glad to see tCaptain Pope continues, saying,— I saw General Hatch speak to Colonel Bennett, chief of staff, el, when he said in a most excited manner, General Hatch's orders are for you to follow me. . . . W[5 more...]
John A. Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 12
nth New York, Twenty-fifth Ohio, Thirtysecond, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops; Col. A. S. Hartwell's Second Brigade, of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops. Lieut.-Col. William Ames commanded the artillery, consisting of Batteries B and F, Third New York, and Battery A, Third Rhode Island. Capt. George P. Hurlbut, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, had a detachment of his regiment. Admiral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear;
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