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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. Search the whole document.

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Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
atter had telegraphed General Halleck from Kingston, Ga., November 11,— I would like to have Foster break the Charleston and Savannah Railroad about Pocotaligo about the 1st of December. A force of some five thousand men was gathered at Port Royal and organized as the Coast Division, under command of General Hatch. Gen. E. E. Potter's First Brigade was composed of the Fifty-sixth, One Hundred and Twentyseventh, One Hundred and Forty-fourth and One Hundred and Fifty-seventh New York, Twenieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a force of twenty-one officers and 540 men. Captains T. L. Appleton and R. H. L. Jewett were on staff duty with General Hatch. A large fleet was ready at Port Royal, the decks of the transports crowded with troops; and the pier at Hilton Head was full of stores and men awaiting transportation. During the 28th Captain Pope's companies were transferred to the steamer Golden Gate, on which was Colonel Hartwe
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
n to Bolan's church two miles distant, marched to the left in the direction of Savannah, when they should have turned to the right at the church to reach Grahamville. or the positions would be given up. General Hardee could spare no troops from Savannah, but ordered two regiments from Charleston to Grahamville. But fortune favored the enemy by the opportune arrival at Savannah at 2 A. M., November 30, of Gen. Gustavus W. Smith with a force of Georgia militia brought from Macon by a roundabouthirty-five hundred men engaged. Lieut.-Col. C. C. Jones, Jr., in his Siege of Savannah, gives their loss as four killed and forty wounded. But the Savannah Republicad by Lieutenant-Colonel Jones: The victory at Honey Hill released the city of Savannah from an impending danger, which, had it not thus been averted, would have nece seem now that if our movements had been delayed a week, when Sherman was near Savannah, Hardee's whole army might have been captured, as the enemy then would not hav
Honey Hill (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: Honey Hill. Our arrival with other troops at Hilton Head was in consequence of General Foster's orders to co-operate with General Sherman in his mar 7 A. M. It was arranged that General Smith should advance about two miles to Honey Hill, which was already fortified for defence, and that Colonel Colcock should tak turned to the left, Colcock made his last stand before seeking his works at Honey Hill; and in the artillery firing that ensued the brave Lieutenant Wildt received ortal wound. General Smith was in position, protected by the earthworks at Honey Hill. In his front was a swamp thick with underbrush and grass, through which floner always seemed to me the most terrible of our battles, but the musketry at Honey Hill was something fearful. The so-called Rebel yell was more prominent than I evresults which are thus summarized by Lieutenant-Colonel Jones: The victory at Honey Hill released the city of Savannah from an impending danger, which, had it not th
Coosawhatchie, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
near the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. Only a squadron of the Third South Carolina Cavalry and one field-piece were in the vicinity at this time. General Foster had selected this line of advance instead of the fortified roads leading to Coosawhatchie and Pocotaligo. General Hatch's flagboat, the Fraser, flying a blue pennant with a single star, on which were Companies G and H, was the first army vessel to arrive. The Fifty-fourth men, headed by Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, sprang ashorered for more enterprising work on the flanks. Meanwhile at the Coosawhatchie cross-road the wisdom of having that point guarded was demonstrated. Captain Pope's account is,— I immediately threw out one company (K) under Leonard on the Coosawhatchie road as skirmishers, and with the others threw up a barricade across the road. Soon Leonard reported a body of cavalry coming down the road, and at the same time a naval ensign with two boat howitzers manned by sailors reported to me, sent b
Sonoma (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
fth Massachusetts, Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops. Lieut.-Col. William Ames commanded the artillery, consisting of Batteries B and F, Third New York, and Battery A, Third Rhode Island. Capt. George P. Hurlbut, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, had a detachment of his regiment. Admiral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Steve
Grahamville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
s the fog lifted. From the landing a tortuous wagon-road led to Grahamville,—a village some eight or ten miles distant, near the Charleston when they should have turned to the right at the church to reach Grahamville. It is said that the guide employed was either ignorant or fait without fires, the pickets disturbed by occasional shots on the Grahamville road during the night. Our failure to seize the railroad on toops from Savannah, but ordered two regiments from Charleston to Grahamville. But fortune favored the enemy by the opportune arrival at Savaharleston and Savannah Railroad; the leading brigade arriving at Grahamville about 8 A. M., on the 30th. With Smith's and the local force it, the district commander, who was temporarily absent, arrived at Grahamville at 7 A. M. It was arranged that General Smith should advance abory beyond Bolan's church reported the enemy advancing down. the Grahamville road. General Hatch moved his column at 7.30 A. M., preceded by
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
wounded (of which one hundred and forty were slight cases), and forty-three missing: a total of seven hundred and fifty-four. Of the Fifty-fourth (with six companies engaged, numbering sixteen officers and three hundred men), the loss was one officer killed and three wounded; and of enlisted men, one killed, thirty-five wounded, and four missing: a total of forty-four. Lieutenant Reid, who was killed, fully expected his fate. He gave last injunctions regarding his family before leaving Morris Island to a brother officer. At Hilton Head he purchased an emblem of the Freemasons, with which order he was affiliated. Lieutenant Chipman wrote:— I can remember poor Reid that morning before we broke camp at the landing. He was blue enough, and said to me that it was his last day on earth; that he should be killed in the fight. Lieutenant Reid was a faithful, experienced, and brave officer, and met his death in the forefront of battle, his body lying in advance of the artillery piece
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Charleston to Grahamville. But fortune favored the enemy by the opportune arrival at Savannah at 2 A. M., November 30, of Gen. Gustavus W. Smith with a force of Georgia militia brought from Macon by a roundabout way. Governor Brown had refused to allow his State troops to serve elsewhere than in Georgia; but General Smith permittGeorgia; but General Smith permitted himself to execute the instructions of General Hardee, and the cars holding the Georgians were shunted from the rails of the Gulf to those of the Charleston and Savannah Railroad; the leading brigade arriving at Grahamville about 8 A. M., on the 30th. With Smith's and the local force it was hoped to protect the railroad until tmith's force engaged in the battle is given as about fourteen hundred effectives, and consisted of the First Brigade of Georgia Militia, the State Line Brigade of Georgia, Thirty-second and Forty-seventh Georgia Volunteers, Athens Battalion, Augusta Battalion, detachments from four companies Third South Carolina Cavalry, and two gu
Pontiac (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops. Lieut.-Col. William Ames commanded the artillery, consisting of Batteries B and F, Third New York, and Battery A, Third Rhode Island. Capt. George P. Hurlbut, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, had a detachment of his regiment. Admiral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieuten
Golden Gate (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
alrymen were seen along the edge of the stream. Moving about half a mile, the companies were then halted and disposed to watch the enemy and resist attack. The Naval Brigade landed and advanced to the first cross-road, pushing a small force farther to the right, which met a few of the enemy. It then moved to a second cross-road and halted. The Thirty-second United States Colored Troops, one of the first regiments to arrive, was sent to support the blue jackets. Our companies on the Golden Gate started at the signal; but about daylight the pilot admitted that he was lost. When the fog lifted and land was seen near by, a boat was sent ashore to obtain information. At last the proper course was ascertained, and the craft made Boyd's Landing, the fourth transport to arrive. Captain Pope landed his men on the rude wharf one at a time, and then joined Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper up the road. Captain Homans's companies on the Fraser moved on time, but the steamer grounded. After a
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