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of the Third South Carolina Cavalry and one field-piece were in the vicinity at this time. General Foster had selected this line of advance instead of the fortified roads leading to Coosawhatchie and Pocotaligo. General Hatch's flagboat, the Fraser, flying a blue pennant with a single star, on which were Companies G and H, was the first army vessel to arrive. The Fifty-fourth men, headed by Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, sprang ashore eagerly, and were the first troops to land. A skirmish linper course was ascertained, and the craft made Boyd's Landing, the fourth transport to arrive. Captain Pope landed his men on the rude wharf one at a time, and then joined Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper up the road. Captain Homans's companies on the Fraser moved on time, but the steamer grounded. After a while she floated, and this detachment also disembarked at the landing and joined the regiment. In the afternoon the creek was crowded with craft. General Foster was there at 2 P. M., and Gene
Daniel G. Spear (search for this): chapter 12
ral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Stevens; Company A, Lieutenant Knowles; Company D, Lieutenant Emerson, commanding, and Lieutenant Hallett; Company I, Lieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a force of twenty-one officers and 540 men. Captains T. L. Appleton and R. H. L. Jewett were on staff duty with Ge
Thomas F. Ellsworth (search for this): chapter 12
rned the bend, rushed up the road, and in the face of a deadly fire advanced to the creek. But it was fruitless, for the pitiless shot and shell so decimated the ranks that the survivors retired after losing over one hundred men in five minutes, including Color Sergeant King, killed, and Sergeant-Major Trotter, Sergeant Shorter, and Sergeant Mitchell, wounded. Colonel Hartwell, wounded and pinned to the ground by his dead horse, was rescued and dragged to the wood by the gallant Lieut. Thomas F. Ellsworth of his regiment. Captains Crane and Boynton were both killed after displaying fearless gallantry. The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New York supported this charge by an advance, but after the repulse retired also. On the right the Twenty-fifth Ohio and Thirty-second United States Colored Troops, swinging to the left, moved from the wood-road, forcing the enemy's left back to their works, but being met by a murderous fire, were brought to a stand, sustaining their position with
George P. Hurlbut (search for this): chapter 12
Hundred and Twentyseventh, One Hundred and Forty-fourth and One Hundred and Fifty-seventh New York, Twenty-fifth Ohio, Thirtysecond, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops; Col. A. S. Hartwell's Second Brigade, of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops. Lieut.-Col. William Ames commanded the artillery, consisting of Batteries B and F, Third New York, and Battery A, Third Rhode Island. Capt. George P. Hurlbut, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, had a detachment of his regiment. Admiral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard
H. J. Carter (search for this): chapter 12
e much exposed to the enemy's fire. They at times blazed away into the woods they fronted. Lieutenant Emerson was severely wounded in the face; and Lieutenant Hallett in the left thigh. Captain Homans received a severe contusion on the inside of the left leg, a pocket-book with greenbacks therein saving him from a mortal wound. Besides the officers, one enlisted man was killed, twenty-one wounded, and three missing. Sergeant-Major Wilson states that sometime in the afternoon, with Sergt. H. J. Carter, Corp. John Barker, and Privates J. Anderson, Thomas Clark, and Peter J. Anderson, all of Company G, he went out from Captain Homans's position, and brought back Lieutenant Reid's and Corporal Foster's bodies. The former was killed by a grape-shot. Meanwhile Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper with Companies E and H maintained their line unchanged on the left of the main road. During the afternoon Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper made a personal reconnoissance of the ground in front, and returnin
e the Naval Brigade remained; and Potter's troops, continuing on to Bolan's church two miles distant, marched to the left in the direction oftraced his steps, going into bivouac about 2 A. M., on the 30th, at Bolan's church. About this rude structure painted white, the troops rest had not arrived at that hour. At about 7 A. M. our cavalry beyond Bolan's church reported the enemy advancing down. the Grahamville road. point of woods. Just before the turn was reached, as one came from Bolan's church, a wood-road ran from the main road to the right, with an there until relieved. He then moved on with the other companies to Bolan's church, where Companies A and I under Lieut. Lewis Reed were leftried one hundred and fifty wounded from the field. When we came to Bolan's church, the whole vicinity was weirdly lighted by great fires of their further conveyance to the landing. General Potter arrived at Bolan's church about midnight. Having disposed troops to cover it, he ad
Louis D. Radzinsky (search for this): chapter 12
hird Rhode Island. Capt. George P. Hurlbut, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, had a detachment of his regiment. Admiral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Stevens; Company A, Lieutenant Knowles; Company D, Lieutenant Emerson, commanding, and Lieutenant Hallett; Company I, Lieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a
Charles E. Briggs (search for this): chapter 12
rge H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, anfused turmoil of sounds pervaded the night air, from the rumbling of artillery, the creaking wagons of the train, and the shouts of drivers urging on their animals. The church, cleared of seats, afforded resting-places for the wounded, whom Surgeon Briggs of the Fifty-fourth and his assistants were attending there or outside. Stores of every description were strewn about to make room in the vehicles for their further conveyance to the landing. General Potter arrived at Bolan's church about m
achusetts, Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops. Lieut.-Col. William Ames commanded the artillery, consisting of Batteries B and F, Third New York, and Battery A, Third Rhode Island. Capt. George P. Hurlbut, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, had a detachment of his regiment. Admiral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Stevens; Comp
Charles G. Chipman (search for this): chapter 12
val brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Stevens; Company A, Lieutenant Knowles; Company D, Lieutenant Emerson, commanding, and Lieutenant Hallett; Company I, Lieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a force of twenty-one officers and 540 men. Captains T. L. Appleton and R. H. L. Jewett were on staff duty with General Hatch. A large f
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