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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. Search the whole document.

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Charles Jewett (search for this): chapter 13
ately, our pickets wounded. General Hatch pushed the One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops along the railroad, and the Twenty-fifth Ohio through Green Pond, to Ashepoo, on the 14th, where the bridges were found burned. A force crossed the river in boats, and drove a few of the enemy away. Meanwhile, during our field service, the following changes had occurred in the Fifty-fourth: Lieutenant Duren, having broken a leg by falling from his horse at Morris Island, went North, and never returned. Lieutenant Littlefield resigned, and Lieutenant Hallett took charge of the camp. Lieutenant Rogers re-joined the regiment from there. Lieutenant James, recommissioned, reported; but his old wound soon forced him to return to Hilton Head. Captain Pope was made major, Lieutenant Howard captain of Company I, and Second Lieutenants Stevens and Charles Jewett, Jr., were promoted first lieutenants. Lieutenants Charles F. Joy and William L. Whitney, Jr., newly appointed, joined.
John B. Duncan (search for this): chapter 13
sickness, but it cleared, with sunny outbursts, on the 11th. The Seventy-fifth and One Hundred and Seventh Ohio joined the division on the 10th. Our brigade the next day was increased by the transfer to it of the Thirtyfourth United States Colored Troops. We were shelling the railroad through the cut whenever trains were heard, and also at intervals after nightfall. Firing in the direction of Savannah occurred on the 11th, and, as we hoped, proved to be Sherman's guns. On the 12th, Captain Duncan, Third Illinois Cavalry, and two men, drifted down past the enemy's batteries at Savannah in a boat, and brought a despatch that the Western army was confronting that city. Frosty nights were now the rule, and the troops, lightly sheltered, thinly clothed, and in many cases without blankets, suffered. Supplies came regularly, and fresh beef in limited quantity was issued. The Sanitary Commission at Devaux's Neck did much for the sick and well. It was now a daily occurrence to bear
O. O. Howard (search for this): chapter 13
ately, our pickets wounded. General Hatch pushed the One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops along the railroad, and the Twenty-fifth Ohio through Green Pond, to Ashepoo, on the 14th, where the bridges were found burned. A force crossed the river in boats, and drove a few of the enemy away. Meanwhile, during our field service, the following changes had occurred in the Fifty-fourth: Lieutenant Duren, having broken a leg by falling from his horse at Morris Island, went North, and never returned. Lieutenant Littlefield resigned, and Lieutenant Hallett took charge of the camp. Lieutenant Rogers re-joined the regiment from there. Lieutenant James, recommissioned, reported; but his old wound soon forced him to return to Hilton Head. Captain Pope was made major, Lieutenant Howard captain of Company I, and Second Lieutenants Stevens and Charles Jewett, Jr., were promoted first lieutenants. Lieutenants Charles F. Joy and William L. Whitney, Jr., newly appointed, joined.
C. J. Colcock (search for this): chapter 13
the strong works were found in possession of a division of the Seventeenth Corps; near there we halted. The Fifty-fourth had formed a junction with Sherman's army, the first body of Eastern troops in the field to meet the stalwart Westerners. On the morning of January 14, the larger part of the Seventeenth Corps, under Maj.-Gen. Frank Blair, crossed from Port Royal Island to the main on a pontoon bridge, and moved toward Pocotaligo, twenty-five miles from Beaufort. They encountered Colonel Colcock, our old friend of Honey Hill, at Gardner's Corners, and drove him with loss to the works mounting twelve guns, at Pocotaligo, before which they bivouacked, intending to assault in the morning; but the enemy under Gen. L. McLaws during the night abandoned this and all his positions along our front, and retired behind the Combahee. Thus fell a stronghold before which the troops of the Department of the South met repeated repulses. It was the most important position between Charleston
Alonzo B. Whitney (search for this): chapter 13
al force, and secured three head of cattle. Good weather prevailed on the 3d, when the Fifty-fourth moved to the right for work on a prolongation of the fortifications. In the afternoon the Thirty-second and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops and part of the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts and two guns went toward Bolan's church, and after light skirmishing returned with but one casualty. That night there was much wild picket firing by men of new colored regiments; and Capt. Alonzo B. Whitney, Twenty-sixth United States Colored Troops, was mortally wounded by our own people. Except occasional shots from the outposts and gun discharges from the naval howitzers on the left to try the range, the forenoon of the 4th passed quietly. Later, a reconnoissance was made by the Thirty-fourth and Thirtyfifth United States Colored Troops, the One Hundred and Forty-fourth New York, and some artillery four miles toward Coosawhatchie, driving the enemy's skirmishers to a battery, wi
Quincy A. Gillmore (search for this): chapter 13
w York and Twenty-fifth Ohio advanced with some artillery and cavalry, driving the enemy from positions about the rice plantations, and damaging the railroad. The Fifty-fourth was now divided up and stationed on picket at several points. General Gillmore had returned and relieved General Foster, whose old wound required attention. This change gave great dissatisfaction to Admiral Dahlgren, who disliked Gillmore, and he asked to be relieved. Our naval vessels were engaging the enemy's batteGillmore, and he asked to be relieved. Our naval vessels were engaging the enemy's batteries in the Edisto. General Schimmelfennig on the 10th landed the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, One Hundred and Forty-fourth New York, and Thirty-second and Thirty-third United States Colored Troops on James Island, and drove the enemy from some advanced works, effecting captures. He withdrew his force on the succeeding day. General Hatch, on the 10th, with a portion of the division, attempted to pass Cuckwold Creek, but desisted after finding the bridge burned and the enemy in strong position.
a detachment from the Coast Division landed at Mackay's Point across the Tullifinny, marched up, and took post opposite Gregory's plantation, where it intrenched. Gregory's was made the landing-place on Devaux's Neck for all our supplies and storeGregory's was made the landing-place on Devaux's Neck for all our supplies and stores. So near were the troops to the railroad that the rumbling of trains and whistling of locomotives could be heard. The position was in an open space surrounded by woods, the main body well intrenched, with pickets in the forest confronted by thtrenched line beyond the Fifty-fourth camp. Daily scouting parties were sent out. Quartermaster Ritchie drew rations at Gregory's, ferried them over in pontoons, and brought them to camp with details of men, as there were no teams. A commissary was established at Gregory's, but no sutler was with the troops. Christmas was a cloudy day, and brought no festivities for the regiment. Some Quaker guns were made and mounted to deceive the enemy, as we had no artillery. On the 26th a party of
t can be seen, pillars of black smoke rise. . . . The saying is that when Sherman gets through South Carolina, a crow can't fly across the country unless he carries rations with him. The Western army had crossed the Salkehatchie and compelled McLaws to fall back upon Branchville. In the action at Rivers's Bridge, Brig.-Gen. Wager Swayne lost a leg, and with other wounded was brought back to Pocotaligo. Foster, on the 3d, made demonstrations with the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts and One Hundre the next day, and took station at Lownde's plantation. The effect of Sherman's advance was being felt in our front, for the Western army was across the North Edisto near Orangeburg. Gen. A. R. Wright retired from Ashepoo across the Edisto, and McLaws from Branchville to Four Hole Swamp. Hardee was also concerned for Charleston, as General Potter, with the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, One Hundred and Forty-fourth New York, and Thirty-second United States Colored Troops entered Bull's Bay on the
L. H. Gartrell (search for this): chapter 13
llifinny River. Potter, leading his skirmishers, forced back the enemy's light troops, making a few captures. Brig.-Gen. L. H. Gartrell, the Confederate district commander, sent the Fifth Georgia, supported by a body of Georgia Reserves and a battlina Cadets, and the German Artillery (four guns), was to move from the Tullifinny trestle-bridge, and give battle. General Gartrell, with the Coosawhatchie force, was ordered against our left. At 7 A. M. on the 7th, covered in their advance to witut we were then better prepared, and our infantry and artillery beat them back with loss. Our left was then assailed by Gartrell's force, when the same result followed. After an action lasting about three hours the enemy called back his troops, witell back, when our troops retired to their fortified camp. The enemy's loss was about one hundred in all, including General Gartrell wounded. Ours was about two hundred. Colonel Silliman, after displaying marked gallantry, was mortally wounded. Hi
Lewis Reed (search for this): chapter 13
n, attempted to pass Cuckwold Creek, but desisted after finding the bridge burned and the enemy in strong position. This force bivouacked ten miles from Salkehatchie that night, and retired the next day. February 12, Captain Homans had a man wounded, while foraging. A scouting party of the One Hundred and Seventh Ohio was fired into that morning, having one man wounded and another missing. Guerillas, or small parties of the enemy, were about, and Captain Emilio with Company E and Lieutenant Reed with Company G scoured the region for them without success. At dark the Fifty-fourth, except Companies E and G, left on picket, moved back from the cross-road in company with the Twenty-fifth Ohio, our regiment bivouacking inside the fort at Salkehatchie. On the evening of the 12th, word was received that the enemy had abandoned Combahee Ferry. The Twenty-fifth Ohio, by a night's march, crossed the river the next day, and took station at Lownde's plantation. The effect of Sherman'
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