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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. Search the whole document.

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James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rcle of batteries the enemy were busy upon new works on James Island. About 10 A. M., on the 24th, the Confederate steamer lonel Shaw's death was confirmed. Battery Simkins on James Island opened against our trenches for the first time on the 2neers, and was situated in the marsh between Morris and James islands. It was constructed upon a foundation of timber, with s rudely dispelled at dark on August 13 by a shell from James Island bursting near Surgeon Stone's tent. These unpleasant vompleted under fire from Sumter, Gregg, Wagner, and the James Island batteries, as well as the missiles of sharpshooters. Md one hundred and sixteen shots at the Swamp Angel from James Island, but only one struck. Sumter's flag was shot away twicvery third day to Morris Island. Fire upon us from the James Island batteries on the left became very troublesome, occasion On the night of the 3d, Wagner fired steadily, and the James Island batteries now and then. Our detail at the front had Ge
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
a. There was no firing of consequence that night. In the morning the Fifty-fourth was moved forward into the trenches. Capt. D. A. Partridge, left sick in Massachusetts, joined July 21, and, as senior officer, assumed command. Preparations were made for a bombardment of Sumter as well as for the siege of Wagner. Work beganed but a few score of men, and this appointment seemed as if given to secure him command commensurate with the rank he held. It gave rise to much criticism in Massachusetts as well as in the regiment, for it was made contrary to custom and without the knowledge of Governor Andrew. Though silently dissatisfied, the officers renderurth details day and night with more or less officers and men at the front, the casualties in the regiment during the siege as given by the Adjutant-General of Massachusetts were but four killed and four wounded. Shortly after the fall of Wagner the following order was issued to the troops. Department of the South, Morris Isl
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Colonel Montgomery, commanding the brigade, on the 29th established his headquarters near the right of our camp. It was learned that a list of prisoners recently received from the enemy contained no names of Fifty-fourth men. On the 30th Lieut.-Col. Henry A. Purviance, Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania, was killed by the premature explosion of one of our own shells. The enemy's steamer Sumter, returning from Morris Island early on the 31st with six hundred officers and men, was fired into by Fort Moultrie, and four men were killed or drowned. With our capture of the ridge on the 26th the last natural cover was attained. Beyond for two hundred yards stretched a strip of sand over which the besiegers must advance. It seemed impossible to progress far, as each attempt to do so resulted in severe losses. Every detail at the front maintained its position only at the cost of life. So numerous were the dead at this period of the siege that at almost any hour throughout the day the sound o
Requa (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
as no firing of consequence that night. In the morning the Fifty-fourth was moved forward into the trenches. Capt. D. A. Partridge, left sick in Massachusetts, joined July 21, and, as senior officer, assumed command. Preparations were made for a bombardment of Sumter as well as for the siege of Wagner. Work began on the artillery line of July 18, that night, for the first parallel, 1,350 yards from Wagner. When completed, it mounted eight siege and field guns, ten mortars, and three Requa rifle batteries. July 23, the second parallel was established some four hundred yards in front of the first. Vincent's Creek on its left was obstructed with floating booms. On its right was the Surf Battery, armed with field-pieces. This parallel was made strong for defence for the purpose of constructing in its rear the Left Batteries against Sumter. It mounted twenty-one light pieces for defence and three thirty-pounder Parrotts and one Wiard rifle. The two parallels were connected by
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ained during its first term of service, at Morris Island. That day was the saddest in the historgineers, and was situated in the marsh between Morris and James islands. It was constructed upon a umter would necessitate the abandonment of Morris Island, for that accomplished, the enemy could bent on the 21st, demanding the surrender of Morris Island and Sumter, under penalty, if not compliedstomary relieving force every third day to Morris Island. Fire upon us from the James Island batteThe enemy's steamer Sumter, returning from Morris Island early on the 31st with six hundred officerrs no. 131. headquarters U. S. Forces, Morris Island, S. C., Aug. 31, 1863. II. The Fifty-fourthey scoured and patrolled the waters about Morris Island. Throughout the whole siege of Charleston L. M. Keitt, the Confederate commander of Morris Island, had been signalling that his force was tethe troops. Department of the South, Morris Island, S. C., Sept. 15, 1863. It is with no ordin[4 more...]
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
derson it was ascertained that the Fifty-fourth's prisoners would not be given up, and Colonel Shaw's death was confirmed. Battery Simkins on James Island opened against our trenches for the first time on the 25th. For the first time also sharpshooters of the enemy fired on our working parties with long-range rifles. Orders came on the 26th that, owing to the few officers and lack of arms, the Fifty-fourth should only furnish fatigue details. Quartermaster Ritchie, who was sent to Hilton Head, returned on the 29th with the officers, men, and camp equipage from St. Helena, and tents were put up the succeeding day. Some six hundred men were then present with the colors, including the sick. The number of sick in camp was very large, owing to the severe work and terrible heat. About nineteen hundred were reported on August 1 in the whole command. The sight of so many pale, enfeebled men about the hospitals and company streets was dispiriting. As an offset, some of those who ha
Pittsfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
night. Early on September 1 our land batteries opened on Sumter, and the monitors on Wagner. Four arches in the north face of Sumter with platforms and guns were carried away. Lieut. P. S. Michie, United States Engineers, was temporarily in charge of the advance works on the right. Much work was done in strengthening the parapets and revetting the slopes. Our Fifty-fourth detail went out under Lieutenant Higginson that morning, and had one man wounded. Rev. Samuel Harrison, of Pittsfield, Mass., commissioned chaplain of the regiment, arrived that day. September 2 the land batteries were throwing some few shots at Sumter and more at Wagner. Capt. Jos. Walker, First New York Engineers, started the sap at 7 P. M. in a new direction under heavy fire. Considering that the trench was but eighty yards from Wagner, good progress was made. The sap-roller could not be used, because of torpedoes planted thereabout. Our fire was concentrated upon Wagner on the 3d, to protect sappi
Cumming's Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
nflicted wounds more painful though less dangerous than the shot of the enemy. Water was scarcer than whiskey. The food, however good when it started for its destination, by exposure, first, on the wharf in Charleston, then on the beach at Cumming's Point, being often forty-eight hours in transitu, was unfit to eat. The unventilated bombproofs, filled with smoke of lamps and smell of blood, were intolerable, so that one endured the risk of shot and shell rather than seek their shelter. The ically. Wagner was ours at last. In accordance with instructions, at dark on the 6th the Confederate ironclads took position near Sumter. Some transport vessels were run close in, and forty barges under Lieutenant Ward, C. S. N., were at Cumming's Point. A courier reported to Colonel Keitt that everything was prepared, whereupon his troops were gradually withdrawn, and embarked after suffering a few casualties in the movement. By midnight Wagner was deserted by all but Capt. T. A. Hugueni
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rms, which had either been destroyed or damaged in their hands by shot and shell, or were thrown away in the effort to save life. The officers present for duty were Captain Emilio, commanding, Surgeon Stone, Quartermaster Ritchie, and Lieutenants T. W. Appleton, Grace, Dexter, Jewett, Emerson, Reid, Tucker, Johnston, Howard, and Higginson. Some fifty men, slightly wounded, were being treated in camp. The severely wounded, including seven officers, were taken on the 19th to hospitals at Beaufort, where every care was given them by the medical men, General Saxton, his officers, civilians, and the colored people. By order of General Terry, commanding Morris Island, the regiment on the 19th was attached to the Third Brigade with the Tenth Connecticut, Twenty-fourth Massachusetts, Seventh New Hampshire, One Hundredth New York, and Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, under General Stevenson. Upon the 20th the labors of the siege work began, for in the morning the first detail was furnished
Folly Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ed from wounds returned, and Brig.-Gen. Edward A. Wild's brigade of the First North Carolina and Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, both colored, arrived and camped on Folly Island. Mr. De Mortie, the regimental sutler, about this time brought a supply of goods. After August 2 the details were somewhat smaller, as the colored brigade on Folly Island began to send over working parties. But calls were filled from the regiment daily for work about the landing and the front. Two men from each company reported as sharpshooters in conjunction with those from other regiments. The famous battery known as the Swamp Angel was begun August 4, and built under directi range of their guns. Reinforcements, consisting of Gen. George H. Gordon's division from the Eleventh Corps, arrived on the 13th and landed on the 15th upon Folly Island. No rain fell from July 18 until August 13, which was favorable for the siege work, as the sand handled was dry and light. This dryness, however, rendered it
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