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Waltham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ommander-in-chief, orders, that a salute of one hundred guns be fired on Boston Common, at twelve, meridian, on Tuesday, Jan. 8th inst., and a national salute be fired, at the same time, for the same purposes, in Charlestown, Lexington, Concord, Waltham, Roxbury, Marblehead, Newburyport, Salem, Groton, Lynn, Worcester, Greenfield, Northampton, Fall River, and Lowell. By command of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in-chief. William Schouler, Adjutant-General. The pu amendment. Mr. Wallis, of Bolton, favored the amendment. Mr. Gifford, of Provincetown, opposed it, and favored the resolutions. He had no fears that Massachusetts would act at the bidding of Virginia or any other State. Mr. French, of Waltham, favored the amendment, which was, in substance, that Massachusetts did not agree with Virginia that the Constitution required amendment to guarantee to each State its rights. Mr. Hyde, of Newton, opposed the amendment. He did not see any go
Fort Winthrop (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ring and passing preparatory measures, the Governor was not idle. A constant correspondence was kept up with our members of Congress and the Governors of other States. Leading merchants, and other gentlemen of experience and wisdom, were daily consulted. The militia was strengthened. A cipher key was arranged, to be used in transmitting messages which required secrecy. The defenceless condition of the forts in Boston harbor was considered. In Fort Warren there was but one gun; in Fort Winthrop none at all; and, in Fort Independence, hardly twenty guns, and most of them were trained on the city itself. The casemates were unfit for human occupation. The grounds inside the forts were covered with workshops and wooden shanties; and, instead of being a defence to the city and harbor, the fortifications of Boston were a standing menace to them, and invited seizure by the enemy. The entire coast of Massachusetts was open to attack from sea; not a fort or an earthwork or a gun was
Accomack (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
f Northfield; Joel Hayden, of Williamsburg; James Ritchie, of Roxbury; Oakes Ames, of Easton; and Eleazer C. Sherman, of Plymouth,—were elected Councillors. William Schouler, of Lynn, was Adjutant-General, to which office he had been appointed by G of Middlesex, the communication was laid on the table, and ordered to be printed. Feb. 1. In Senate.—Mr. Whitney, of Plymouth, from the Committee on Federal Relations, reported a bill to create an emergency fund for the Governor of $100,000, to ttained by Messrs. Northend and Stone, of Essex; Davis, of Bristol; and Hardy, of Norfolk; and opposed by Mr. Whiting, of Plymouth. The resolves passed,—yeas 24, nays 6. The bill provided, that the commissioners should be appointed by the Governor, pril 5. In Senate.—A resolve in favor of calling a national convention was discussed. It was opposed by Mr. Whiting, of Plymouth, and Mr. Walker, of Worcester, and advocated by Mr. Northend, of Essex, and Mr. Hardy, of Norfolk. It was finally, on
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
onquer in the end. I distrust these guns at Fort Sumter. I do not believe that Abraham Lincoln means war. I do not believe in the madness of the Cabinet. Nothing but madness can provoke war with the Gulf States. My suspicion is this : that the Administration dares not compromise. It trembles before the five hundred thousand readers of the New-York Tribune. But there is a safe way to compromise. It is this: seem to provoke war. Cannonade the forts. What will be the first result? New-York commerce is pale with bankruptcy. The affrighted seaboard sees grass growing in its streets. It will start up every man whose livelihood hangs upon trade, intensifying him into a compromiser. Those guns fired at Fort Sumter are only to frighten the North into a compromise. If the Administration provokes bloodshed, it is a trick,—nothing else. It is the masterly cunning of the devil of compromise, the Secretary of State. He is not mad enough to let these States run into battle. He
Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
orders, that a salute of one hundred guns be fired on Boston Common, at twelve, meridian, on Tuesday, Jan. 8th inst., and a national salute be fired, at the same time, for the same purposes, in Charlestown, Lexington, Concord, Waltham, Roxbury, Marblehead, Newburyport, Salem, Groton, Lynn, Worcester, Greenfield, Northampton, Fall River, and Lowell. By command of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in-chief. William Schouler, Adjutant-General. The purpose of firing thesd not want the matter forced through by outside influence. He was opposed to the resolves, and hoped they would be rejected. Mr. Fisk, of Shelburne, advocated the proposition, and would forward it with his hand and vote. Mr. Prentiss, of Marblehead, opposed the measure in a speech of considerable length, and asked if we would send commissioners to a convention of traitors? Let us rather send the sword. Mr. Slack, of Boston, spoke in opposition. He foresaw that the convention would ac
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
of Abraham Lincoln on the fourth of March. South Carolina had already voted itself out of the Union,ich had been precipitated upon them by the South-Carolina secession ordinance. Our navy was scatterdirect terms to the secession ordinance of South Carolina, and said, While I would not withhold fromnow in command of Fort Sumter, in the State of South Carolina, His Excellency John A. Andrew, Govereedings of the House of Representatives of South Carolina, Jan. 23, 1861. Mr. Holland offered te, that, in view of the great suffering in South Carolina, the immediate consequence of the citizensssachusetts or elsewhere, that any part of South Carolina is suffering, or likely to suffer, for the. John G. Palfrey spoke briefly. He said, South Carolina has marshalled herself into revolution; ane, what is the good of it? You may punish South Carolina for going out of the Union: that does not over such an experiment. If you cannonade South Carolina, you cannonade her into the sympathy of th[1 more...]
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
. John Z. Goodrich, of West Stockbridge, who, being afterwards appointed Collector of the Port of Boston, resigned on the 29th of March, 1861. Oliver Warner, of Northampton, was elected Secretary of State; Henry K. Oliver, of Salem, Treasurer and Receiver-General; Dwight Foster, of Worcester, Attorney-General; and Levi Reed, of Abington, Auditor of Accounts. Jacob Sleeper, of Boston; John I. Baker, of Beverly; James M. Shute, of Somerville; Hugh M. Greene, of Northfield; Joel Hayden, of Williamsburg; James Ritchie, of Roxbury; Oakes Ames, of Easton; and Eleazer C. Sherman, of Plymouth,—were elected Councillors. William Schouler, of Lynn, was Adjutant-General, to which office he had been appointed by Governor Banks; he was also acting Quartermaster and Inspector-General of the Commonwealth,—the entire duties of which offices he performed with the assistance of William Brown, of Boston, clerk, and one man, who had charge of the State arsenal at Cambridge, in which were deposited the
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ers of New Orleans, Jan. 8, 1815, by the deceased patriot, General Jackson, and in honor of the gallant conduct and wise foresight of Major Anderson, now in command of Fort Sumter, in the State of South Carolina, His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in-chief, orders, that a salute of one hundred guns be fired on Boston Common, at twelve, meridian, on Tuesday, Jan. 8th inst., and a national salute be fired, at the same time, for the same purposes, in Charlestown, Lexington, Concord, Waltham, Roxbury, Marblehead, Newburyport, Salem, Groton, Lynn, Worcester, Greenfield, Northampton, Fall River, and Lowell. By command of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in-chief. William Schouler, Adjutant-General. The purpose of firing these salutes was to revive old patriotic memories. The 8th of January had been held a holiday by the Democratic party since the presidency of General Jackson; though of late years it had been, in a great measure, passed ove
Windham, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
hrough the conflict. John A. Andrew was the twenty-first Governor of Massachusetts since the adoption of the Constitution of the State in 1780. He was born at Windham, in the District of Maine, about fifteen miles from Portland, on the 31st of May, 1818. The family was of English origin, descending from Robert Andrew, of Rowlehe Reverend Francis Higginson, the famous pastor of the first church in the colony. The grandfather of Governor Andrew was a silversmith in Salem, who removed to Windham, where he died. His son Jonathan was born in Salem, and lived there until manhood, when he also removed to Windham. There he married Miss Nancy G. Pierce, formeWindham. There he married Miss Nancy G. Pierce, formerly preceptress of Fryeburg Academy, where Daniel Webster was once a teacher. These were the parents of Governor Andrew. At an early age, he entered Bowdoin College, from which he graduated in the class of 1837. He then removed to Boston, and entered, as a law student, the office of Henry H. Fuller, Esq. Being admitted to the
Boxford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
men, civil and military, who, by their services and sacrifices, gave renown to the Commonwealth, and carried her with imperishable honor through the conflict. John A. Andrew was the twenty-first Governor of Massachusetts since the adoption of the Constitution of the State in 1780. He was born at Windham, in the District of Maine, about fifteen miles from Portland, on the 31st of May, 1818. The family was of English origin, descending from Robert Andrew, of Rowley village, now Boxford, Essex County, Mass., who died there in 1668. He was connected with most of the ancient families of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay. The grandmother of Governor Andrew was the grand-daughter of the brave Captain William Pickering, who commanded the Province Galley, in 1707, for the protection of the fisheries against the French and Indians; and the mother of her husband was Mary Higginson, a direct descendant of the Reverend Francis Higginson, the famous pastor of the first church in the colony. Th
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