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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 59. battles of Spottsylvania, Va: battle of Sunday, May 8, 1864. (search)
of our army until half-past 6 o'clock in the evening. For, an hour previous to that time our batteries in position played with destructive effect upon the enemy's lines. It was growing dark, and the general attack was about commencing, when Generals Grant and Meade, with their respective staffs, took position on the crest of an elevated plateau near where Griffin first met Longstreet's forces on Sunday, to see what could be seen of the battle. It opened at last at half-past 6 o'clock, growi long constructed, in anticipation of the very emergency which has now arrived. To advance directly upon these works, defended as they are by an army which has thus far so stubbornly opposed us, will prove a fearful business. I believe that General Grant will first try other means. Meanwhile the army rests; the battle of musketry has ceased for a time in the forests; only the dull boom of a distant cannonade links the fortnight of battles past with the weeks of battle yet to come. And a
Spottsylvania Court-house, while the Second corps relieved the cavalry. Many of our distinguished generals were in consultation at Todd's tavern, including Generals Grant, Meade, Sheridan and others. It was now decided to send the cavalry corps to the rear of Lee, cut his line of communication, destroy his supplies, and do himgg. A Southern account. headquarters, Gordon's brigade, Brook Church, May 13, 1864. I will attempt a brief detail of the recent raid that emerged from Grant's lines on the Rapidan. Being one of the pursuing party our means of observation will not ensure a general detail of the pursuit, as, writing from the spur of the, and the wild, wooded nature of the country, had almost resolved our arm of the service into infantry. General Lee, following his successes, was closely pressing Grant down in the direction of Fredericksburg, giving the cavalry their share in the immediate work. In the meantime it seemed that a vastly organized force of the en
eness, wisdom and guidance. For reasons known only to Him, it has been decreed that this country should be the scene of unparalleled outrage, and this nation the monumental sufferer of the nineteenth century. With a heavy heart, but an undiminished confidence in our cause, I approach the performance of a duty rendered imperative by my sense of weakness before the Almighty, and of justice to the people. It is not necessary that I tell you that the first Virginia campaign under Lieutenant-General Grant, in whom I have every confidence, and whose courage and fidelity the people do well to honor, is virtually closed. He has conducted his great enterprise with discreet ability. He has inflicted great loss upon the enemy. He has crippled their strength and defeated their plans. In view, however, of the situation in Virginia, the disaster at Red river, the delay at Charleston, and the general state of the country, I, Abraham Lincoln, do hereby recommend that Thursday, the twenty-
seur, taking two wagons with him. Firing on our right, probably at plank-road. Grant crossed, May 4, 1864, at Ely's and Germania Fords. Cavalry fighting near the rter dark, with all the batteries, as we ascertained, that though we had whipped Grant badly on the fifth and sixth, he — was moving toward Richmond. Stopped at Verd New Court-house. Fighting yesterday and today at Court-house. We got between Grant and Richmond. Marched seven miles. Tuesday, 10th.--At sunrise, put Captain badly. About four P. M. went to Longstreet's line, and saw the charges made by Grant's men on our left. Seven heavy charges made and repulsed. Just before dark thwere using axes in our front. Thursday, May 12--Morning foggy. At daybreak, Grant charged over our lines, at Dole's position, capturing eight guns of Cutshaw's ause is situated, and made a weak point in our lines, as it could be occupied by Grant if we left it out of our lines, while, if we took it in, it was scarcely tenabl
o reached the south bank were afterward picked up by the army gunboat, Charles Chamberlain. A deserter from Lee's army was captured, who stated that Lee had given Grant a very hard fight. Contrabands report Grant whipped, and falling back. It is life or death to us here as to which way the scales turn in reference to Grant's movGrant whipped, and falling back. It is life or death to us here as to which way the scales turn in reference to Grant's movement, and news from him is most anxiously awaited. Some distance back from the shore, nearly opposite headquarter's boat, and near a brick house, a rebel signal flag has been in constant use. This afternoon, Lieutenant Bladenheizer, commanding the army gunboat, Brewster, with one hundred and twenty men from the Sixty-seventh OhGrant's movement, and news from him is most anxiously awaited. Some distance back from the shore, nearly opposite headquarter's boat, and near a brick house, a rebel signal flag has been in constant use. This afternoon, Lieutenant Bladenheizer, commanding the army gunboat, Brewster, with one hundred and twenty men from the Sixty-seventh Ohio regiment, landed and succeeded in capturing the party with all their flags, telescopes, &c. Lieutenant Bladenheizer was yesterday promoted to a Captaincy for gallant conduct.
the national enemy. Simultaneously with the advance of General Grant on Richmond, and that of General Sherman on Atlanta, thwith the encouraging reports received from the North of General Grant's progress, induced us to hope that the plan of an exteshed; the main army of the rebellion would be weakened; General Grant would be relieved to that extent, while we had always sntry. Upon examining these prisoners I was informed that Grant had received a severe repulse; that Sheridan, who was movinany force. A telegram from General Halleck indicated General Grant's views in regard to the valley. He desired that the lre during the night. August fifth, in the afternoon, General Grant in person visited headquarters, and had a conference wid by those who best understood their real value. Lieutenant-General Grant handsomely acknowledges that all had been accomplattacked and annihilated. The subsequent movements of Generals Grant and Sherman brought the war to a full and fortunate co
d by us was three hundred, including twelve officers, two heavy rifled guns, two light guns, and six caissons. The loss of the army was one man drowned, two men killed, one officer captured, who accidentally wandered through our pickets, and ten men wounded while upon the picket line by the shells of the navy. Always chary of mentioning with commendation the acts of my own personal staff, yet I think the troops who saw it will agree to the cool courage and daring of Lieutenant Sidney B. DeKay, aid-de-camp, in landing on the night of the twenty-fifth, and remaining aiding in reembarkation on the twenty-seventh. For the details of the landing and the operations, I beg leave to refer you to the reports of Major-General Weitzel, commanding the division landed. Trusting my action will meet with the approval of the Lieutenant-General, the report is respectfully submitted. Benjamin F. Butler, Major-General. Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, Commanding Armies of the United States.
despatch. off City Point, Va., May 5, 1864. Lieutenant-General Grant, Commanding Armies of the United States, Washingtd execution of the plan. When, four weeks since, Lieutenant-General Grant, the actual commander of the armies of the Unitedout in co-operation with the Grand Army of the Potomac. General Grant had considered the various plans proposed with this objed position on the Rapidan, thus forcing the rebels to give Grant battle, or press rapidly rearward to the walls of their cap, only ceased with the coming of night. The good news from Grant, read to the troops to-night, called forth cheers that must do it. He can afford to be defeated for the sake of making Grant's victory thoroughly complete, and the rebels will find thawould be closed. To accomplish an end of such advantage to Grant as the crippling of his antagonist in this regard, General o reinforce the exhausted and demoralized hordes opposed to Grant. It may well be supposed that the troops were greatly fa
at Meridian, Mississippi. On the sixth of February a communication was received from Lieutenant-General Grant, directing an expedition, commanded by General Stoneman, to be sent from East Tennesseevade any heavy engagements with the enemy's forces. Again, on the thirteenth of February, General Grant telegraphed me to prepare a cavalry expedition, about ten thousand strong, to penetrate Nortund about three thousand of the enemy defending the place, and drawn up in line of battle behind Grant's creek, to await Stoneman's attack. Without hesitation, a general charge was made by our men, April, and through me to my subcommanders, to disregard all orders except those coming from General Grant or himself, and to resume hostilities at once, sparing no pains to press the enemy firmly, aishment of which the people of the country zealously gave their assistance. May sixteenth General Grant, through his Chief of Staff, General Rawlins, directed me to order to some point north of th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 93. the burning of Chambersburg. (search)
, some twelve hundred strong, expressly for duty in his department — the men were enlisted under a positive assurance, based on the order authorizing the organization, that they were to be kept on duty in the department. They were ordered to General Grant after the battles of the Wilderness. He organized six regiments of one hundred days men, before the advent of McCausland, and they were ordered to Washington as soon as they were ready to move. We are assured that Governor Curtin, fully twowas brought to General Early's headquarters at Williamsport, and there paroled to effect his exchange. General Early there informed him that he had directed Chambersburg to be burned in. retaliation for the destruction of property in Virginia by Grant, Meade, and Hunter, and that the account was now squared. A number of the thieves who participated in burning Chambersburg, were sent suddenly to their last account. An officer whose papers identify him as Major Bowen, Eighth Virginia cavalry
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