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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore).

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Humphreys (search for this): chapter 1
ly ordered to attack with his whole force, and I hoped before sundown to have broken through the enemy's line. This order was not carried out. At four P. M. General Humphreys was directed to attack, General Sykes' division moving in support of Humphreys' right. All these men fought with determined courage, but without success. GHumphreys' right. All these men fought with determined courage, but without success. General Humphreys was conspicuous for his gallantry throughout the action. Our forces had been repulsed at all points, and it was necessary to look upon the day's work as a failure. It is not pleasant to dwell upon these results even at this distance of time, and I have, therefore, been thus brief in my statement of them. FroGeneral Humphreys was conspicuous for his gallantry throughout the action. Our forces had been repulsed at all points, and it was necessary to look upon the day's work as a failure. It is not pleasant to dwell upon these results even at this distance of time, and I have, therefore, been thus brief in my statement of them. From the night of the thirteenth until the night of the fifteenth, our men held their positions. Something was done in the way of intrenching, and some angry skirmishing and annoying artillery firing was indulged in in the meantime. I directed preparations to be made for another attack on the morning of the fourteenth, but, for re
November 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1
the time it was under my command: On the seventh day of November, 1862, General Buckingham arrived at my headquarters at Orleans, Virginia, with the following order and letter: war Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5, 1862. General Orders No. 182: By direction of the President of the United States it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. war Department, Washington City, November 5, 1862. Major-General Burnside. Commanding, etc.: General: Immediately on assuming command of the Army of the Potomac, you will report the position of your troops and what you purpose doing with them. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. After some consultation, it was decided that General Buckingham and myself should p
had orders to support them. I then inquired if any of General Smith's corps were engaged, and was told that they were not. I returned to headquarters, passing Captain Cutts, who arrived as I left General Franklin, and reported the information to General Burnside, who seemed at the time annoyed at the smallness of the force engagedops had been put into the fight. It was about 12:30 o'clock when I arrived with my report at headquarters. P. M. Lydig, Captain, and A. D. C. I next sent Captain Cutts with an order to General Franklin to advance his right and front. Captain Cutts states in his note book that he carried the order to General Franklin, and theCaptain Cutts states in his note book that he carried the order to General Franklin, and the General said to him that it was impossible to advance; upon which he returned to me to show why General Franklin thought it was impossible to advance. When he communicated the reply to me, he says that my reply was, But he (General Franklin) must advance. I then sent Captain Goddard to General Franklin with an order, which the f
C. B. Comstock (search for this): chapter 1
egraphic communication with Washington should be interrupted, I directed Lieutenant Comstock, my Chief-Engineer, on the morning of the fourteenth, to ask General Wooon the morning of the fifteenth: Washington, November 14, 1862. Lieutenant Comstock: I have received your two telegrams to-day. Captain Spaulding has arriv headquarters Eng. Brig., Washington, D. C., November 17, 1862--7 P. M. Lieutenant Comstock, Engineer, General Burnside's Headquarters, A. of P.: Major Spaulding General. headquarters Eng. Brig., Washington, D. C. November 18, 1862. Lieutenant Comstock, or in his absence, Chief of General Burnside's Staff: Major Spauldine waiting for his return was told that a despatch had been received from Lieutenant Comstock, my Chief Engineer, wishing to know if he (Colonel Spaulding), with his and I take pleasure in referring to the reports of General Woodbury and Lieutenant Comstock for a more detailed account of this gallant work. It was now near nig
November 11th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1
s of the army for concentration near Warrenton, with a view to accumulating supplies, and for other purposes, should be carried out, and that he should remain in command of the army until we reached Warrenton. It was understood that the army was then moving as near as possible under certain general instructions contained in a letter from the President to General McClellan, a copy of which was sent to me under cover of the following letter: headquarters of the Army, Washington, November 11, 1862, Major-General Burnside, Commanding, etc.: General: Your despatch of the seventh was received last evening at nine o'clock. I telegraphed to you this morning to arrange a meeting for to-morrow. I hope to hear from you to-night. I enclose you herewith a copy of a letter from the President to General McClellan, dated the thirteenth of last month. I wish you to carefully consider the President's views as contained in that letter, so that we may talk it over understandingly to-morr
November 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1
and that he would at once order by telegraph the pontoon trains spoken of in my plan, and would, upon his return to Washington, see that they were promptly forwarded. After his return, he sent me the following telegram: Washington, November 14, 1862. Major-General A. E. Burnside, Commanding Army of the Potomac: The President has just assented to your plan. He thinks it will succeed if you move rapidly, otherwise not. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. This despatch was received iving an immediate reply, I directed him to telegraph to General Woodbury a second time, urging him to forward the trains promptly. To this second despatch he received the following answer on the morning of the fifteenth: Washington, November 14, 1862. Lieutenant Comstock: I have received your two telegrams to-day. Captain Spaulding has arrived, and thirty-six pontoons have arrived. Forty men are expected in the morning. Captain Spaulding received Captain Duane's order of the sixth
November 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1
Doc. 1. the Army of the Potomac. Report of Major-General Burnside. New York, November 13, 1865. To the Adjutant-General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the Army of the Potomac during the time it was under my command: On the seventh day of November, 1862, General Buckingham arrived at my headquarters at Orleans, Virginia, with the following order and letter: war Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5, 1862. General Orders No. 182: By direction of the President of the United States it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. war Department, Washington City, November 5, 1862. Major-General Burnside. Commanding, etc.: General: Immediately on assuming command of the Army o
November 13th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1
Doc. 1. the Army of the Potomac. Report of Major-General Burnside. New York, November 13, 1865. To the Adjutant-General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the Army of the Potomac during the time it was under my command: On the seventh day of November, 1862, General Buckingham arrived at my headquarters at Orleans, Virginia, with the following order and letter: war Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5, 1862. General Orders No. 182: By direction of the President of the United States it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. war Department, Washington City, November 5, 1862. Major-General Burnside. Commanding, etc.: General: Immediately on assuming command of the Army
William B. Franklin (search for this): chapter 1
Meade were driven back from the wood; at 2:25 Franklin did his best; at three P. M. things looked bel Franklin at that time. The report of General Franklin will give the movements of the left grandsent Captain P. M. Lydig, of my staff, to General Franklin, to ascertain the condition of affairs instatement is as follows: I joined General Franklin in a grove of trees in the centre of his sing Captain Cutts, who arrived as I left General Franklin, and reported the information to General next sent Captain Cutts with an order to General Franklin to advance his right and front. Captain is note book that he carried the order to General Franklin, and the General said to him that it was he day of the battle of Fredericksburg to General Franklin, on the left, with this order from Generand A. D. C. I had before this sent to General Franklin an order by telegraph, directing him to m The afternoon was now well advanced. General Franklin before this had been positively ordered t[9 more...]
November 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1
shington was broken, General Woodbury sent in the following despatches, which reached me by orderlies after my arrival at Falmouth : headquarters Eng. Brig., Washington, D. C., November 17, 1862--7 P. M. Lieutenant Comstock, Engineer, General Burnside's Headquarters, A. of P.: Major Spaulding has not been able to get off to-day. He expects to start at ten A. M. to-morrow. I will telegraph when he leaves. H. Bowers, A. A, General. headquarters Eng. Brig., Washington, D. C. November 18, 1862. Lieutenant Comstock, or in his absence, Chief of General Burnside's Staff: Major Spaulding has been delayed in obtaining harness, teamsters, etc., for two hundred and seventy new horses. He expects to start tonight. D. P. Woodbury, Brigadier-General, Volunteers. On the nineteenth General Hooker's grand division was at Hartwood, and a portion of the cavalry occupied positions above him, opposite the fords, where they could cross upon the receipt of the necessary orders. It
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