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Mount Sterling, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
uld immediately endeavor to escape, I ordered a detachment of the First Kentucky Scouts to take the road as soon as possible, and march by the way of Mount Eden to Taylorsville, on which route it was thought the depredators could either be intercepted or their whereabouts ascertained. Before the scoots could march, however, we learned that Morgan in force had succeeded in getting in between us and the United States forces, under command of Brigadier-General S. G. Burbridge; had captured Mount Sterling and Paris; and had burnt the bridges on the Kentucky Central Railroad. These events, occurring on the same day the road was cut between here and Louisville, presented the view of concerted action, and led to the belief that the enemy had an objective point somewhere between the break in the Central Railroad at Paris, and that upon the road from here to Louisville. This place, it seemed to me, held out greater inducements to him than any other; inasmuch as here he could strike the great
Owenton (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
that a large force was advancing on that road. Hearing nothing from the pickets stationed at Hord's house, I rather doubted the information, and leaving Colonel Monroe to defend the Georgetown pike, I took six mounted men and started out on the Owenton road. I had not gone far when I discovered the enemy moving up the hill to attack the fort. Ordering the cavalry that were with me to make for the fort by the road leading up the hill next to the river, I made my way up the hill, reaching the ns), who were kept a day or two and released on parole. On Friday evening, just about sundown, a party of rebels made an audacious attack upon the fort on Blanton's Hill, north of the town. They drove in the pickets near the barracks, on the Owenton road, and captured a six-pounder stationed there, following it up with a determined dash for the fort, as if they meant business. Finding themselves met by a more stubborn defence and a hotter fire of small arms and artillery than they had anti
Sangamon County (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
The presentation speech was written, memorized and rehearsed, and I have no doubt every thing would have gone off well but for one thing. Mr. Morgan didn't call; and now, while the dashing horse-thief is making remarkable time out of the State, the wreath is all withered and sere. An Illinois copperhead, present during the siege, indulged largely in fierce rebel talk, and deserves to be ventilated. His name is B. B. Pepper, and he hails from Springfield. It is hoped the people of Sangamon county will put Mr. Pepper in a box when he returns to them, and keep him at home. The loyal people of Kentucky do not want him, and the rebels despise him. Doubts have repeatedly been expressed in regard to Governor Bramlette's soundness on the national goose. No one present during the siege of Frankfort can for a moment doubt that the Governor is thoroughly, heartily, and enthusiastically loyal. The rebels and copperheads bear testimony to his loyalty by abusing him heartily. Severa
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
errilla forces. The capture of the morning train from Louisville, on the eighth instant, was the first intimation had of urring on the same day the road was cut between here and Louisville, presented the view of concerted action, and led to the l Railroad at Paris, and that upon the road from here to Louisville. This place, it seemed to me, held out greater inducemearious roads picketed. The railroad being again open to Louisville, exertions were made to ship the public papers and store Tilford, of the Adjutant--General's office--started for Louisville. When nearing Pleasureville the road was discovered to outh Frankfort. I sent a special messenger through to Louisville, with an order to Colonel Gathright, commanding the milihe railroad, in establishing connection between here and Louisville, leaving a sufficient guard at the most important pointsonvey the most valuable portion of the State property to Louisville. Accordingly, several million dollars' worth of ordnanc
Peak's Mill (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
y indebted for the security of her capital, with its valuable public property. The young men of Frankfort, and from Peak's Mill and Bald Knob precincts, who so nobly rallied to the defence, and, with the dauntless nerve of veterans, met a foe suped yards, the train and guards uninjured reached the depot at 7:15 o'clock P. M. The enrolled militia of this city, Peak's Mill precinct, and other parts of the county, had been collecting during the day. A squad under Captain Sanford Goins were have done under different circumstances. To those citizens of the town and county, especially to the noble boys of Peak's Mill precinct, who promptly responded to the call of the commanding officer in the hour of peril and danger, all honor and ers. So it was manifest that the main dependence must be in the indomitable spirit of the citizens, town and county. Peak's Mill and Bald Knob each sent in a full company of half-tamed tigers — men whose faces indicated good fighting qualities, an
Springfield, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
nsient young ladies of the Capitol Hotel. The presentation speech was written, memorized and rehearsed, and I have no doubt every thing would have gone off well but for one thing. Mr. Morgan didn't call; and now, while the dashing horse-thief is making remarkable time out of the State, the wreath is all withered and sere. An Illinois copperhead, present during the siege, indulged largely in fierce rebel talk, and deserves to be ventilated. His name is B. B. Pepper, and he hails from Springfield. It is hoped the people of Sangamon county will put Mr. Pepper in a box when he returns to them, and keep him at home. The loyal people of Kentucky do not want him, and the rebels despise him. Doubts have repeatedly been expressed in regard to Governor Bramlette's soundness on the national goose. No one present during the siege of Frankfort can for a moment doubt that the Governor is thoroughly, heartily, and enthusiastically loyal. The rebels and copperheads bear testimony to his
Taylorsville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
etachment of General John H. Morgan's guerrilla forces. The capture of the morning train from Louisville, on the eighth instant, was the first intimation had of the presence of the enemy in this section of the State. Supposing the cutting of the road to have been the work of some small marauding band of horse-thieves, who would immediately endeavor to escape, I ordered a detachment of the First Kentucky Scouts to take the road as soon as possible, and march by the way of Mount Eden to Taylorsville, on which route it was thought the depredators could either be intercepted or their whereabouts ascertained. Before the scoots could march, however, we learned that Morgan in force had succeeded in getting in between us and the United States forces, under command of Brigadier-General S. G. Burbridge; had captured Mount Sterling and Paris; and had burnt the bridges on the Kentucky Central Railroad. These events, occurring on the same day the road was cut between here and Louisville, pres
Blue Grass (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
ction, and led to the belief that the enemy had an objective point somewhere between the break in the Central Railroad at Paris, and that upon the road from here to Louisville. This place, it seemed to me, held out greater inducements to him than any other; inasmuch as here he could strike the greatest blow to the State by the destruction of the public records, &c.; and could arm his new recruits, whom he was rapidly mounting, as he passed along, upon the finest stock ever produced in the Blue Grass region. In addition to this, General Burbridge, having come upon his rear, as we were informed by special courier, was pressing him with the utmost vigor. Here he could procure artillery, and cross his command in a few hours; and, destroying the bridges, avoid, or so delay pursuit as to be able to strike the Louisville and Nashville Railroad with impunity. In view of these conclusions, which subsequent events proved to be correct, it was determined not to send any part of the cavalry
Woodford (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
ns in the fort. Major Hutchinson was wounded in the face, and John Coleman in the breast, both seriously, but neither mortally. Information was received through prisoners, that the enemy lost five men wounded; and there was one horse captured by us. Hostilities having ceased for a while, and Colonel Monroe arriving, it was concluded to send a detachment for each of the two guns outside of the fort. Colonel Monroe commanded one of the detachments in person, and Mr. Thos. Buford, of Woodford county, the other. This work they accomplished. These guns were covered by a fire from the fort; had they not been, the presence of mind of young Frank Gray in bringing away the friction primers would have prevented the enemy from using them against us. Too much credit cannot be awarded to Sergeant Johnson, of the Second Maryland; Captain San. Goins, of this place; Mr. Albert Bayliss, of Shelby; and Mr. J. B. Gibson, of Cincinnati, the latter an old Kentucky Military Institute cadet; and
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
ort, for the purpose of making a magnificent floral wreath with which to encircle the brows of John Morgan. The wreath was made, and was to be presented by the transient young ladies of the Capitol Hotel. The presentation speech was written, memorized and rehearsed, and I have no doubt every thing would have gone off well but for one thing. Mr. Morgan didn't call; and now, while the dashing horse-thief is making remarkable time out of the State, the wreath is all withered and sere. An Illinois copperhead, present during the siege, indulged largely in fierce rebel talk, and deserves to be ventilated. His name is B. B. Pepper, and he hails from Springfield. It is hoped the people of Sangamon county will put Mr. Pepper in a box when he returns to them, and keep him at home. The loyal people of Kentucky do not want him, and the rebels despise him. Doubts have repeatedly been expressed in regard to Governor Bramlette's soundness on the national goose. No one present during the
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