hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. T. Sherman 609 21 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 565 25 Browse Search
United States (United States) 504 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 460 6 Browse Search
J. M. Schofield 408 6 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 371 9 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 312 10 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 309 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 303 1 Browse Search
Wesley Merritt 290 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 447 total hits in 96 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
the brave and gallant fellows in the Tenth Army Corps (under Major-General Gillmore), were sent to General Butler, to participate in the movement, forming their encampment at Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown. That Yorktown and Gloucester Point, both at the mouth of the York river, should have been selected for the rendezvous of these troops, naturally led to the supposition that the advance was intended to be made up the Peninsula by the route which proved so fearfully disastrous to McClellan. But this show of force was merely a stupendous ruse de guerre, and circumstances indicate that it succeeded admirably in deceiving the rebels. Their journals have constantly spoken of these troops as destined to follow the path of 1862, and that the assurance of their deception might be made doubly sure, a brigade of Union troops was despatched by General Butler even as late as yesterday to White House landing, where, at sunset, when we last heard from them, they were sedulously engaged
reaches Wilson's wharf, a point about thirty-five miles below Richmond. Here a regiment of General Wilde's negro brigade have effected a landing, and are busily engaged in making preparations to hothem. The attack on Fort Powhatan. Headquarters of General Butler, May 25, 1864. General Wilde is in command at Wilson's wharf, on the north side of the James. He has a garrison, all negerposition of divine Providence, escape butchery at the hands of your gentlemen comrades? General Wilde replied, We will try that. And the fight commenced. At first it raged fiercely on the left broke and tried to run. The fight lasted till about five o'clock, when hostilities ceased. General Wilde directed the operations in person, and made preparations to renew the fight, but during the as told in the song, and Folded their tents like the Arabs, And silently stole away. General Wilde is an enthusiast on the subject of colored troops. He firmly believes that a white man, in
William E. Jones (search for this): chapter 155
erate with the monitors and gunboats. To this statement the Admiral replied, in substance, that owing to shoal water in Trent Reach, as shown by coast-survey chart, the draft of the monitors, and rebel torpedoes, it would be very difficult, if not impracticable, at present, to get up as high as Dr. Howlett's farm. In order to thoroughly remove obstructions, it would be necessary to control the left bank. The enemy now occupy, in considerable force, the high ground on the left bank, around Jones' Neck, and the same difficulty will be found at Dutch Gap. This occupancy would interrupt the supply of coal for the monitors. The Admiral, however, promised all possible aid and support, and would at least protect the river line below where the fleet now lies (Four Mile Creek). A despatch has since been received that he has started to move up, and will come as far as possible. in camp, Tuesday Morning, May 17, 1864. The hardest fighting of the campaign on the south side of the James r
J. A. Wagner (search for this): chapter 155
e Saturday night, the whole western portion of the line, for nearly three miles, had been carried and was firmly held by Gillmore, the enemy charging fiercely upon him, but meeting with a decisive repulse. General Smith, meanwhile, had approached to within a few hundred yards of the eastern portion of the line, which being too strong to be carried by assault, preparations were forthwith set on foot for carrying it by siege. To this end, the engineers of the Tenth corps, the veterans of old Wagner and Gregg, and known as Serrell's New York Volunteer Engineers, were immediately ordered to the front with their tools, and the siege train was started forward. Monday morning the siege work was to begin in good earnest. Gillmore, having thus firmly planted himself within the enemy's works, was clear and decided in the opinion that the army should go right to intrenching its position. The line, which had been captured, of course, needed a little engineering, to give it a practicable fro
on. Friday dawned with alternate cloud and sunshine. General Butler's staff were early in the saddle, and galloped to the position of yesterday on the left of the pike. The disposition of the troops was at once made and the force put in motion. General Gillmore was to move from the left to the railroad at Chester Junction, thence up the road to turn their flank. General Gibbon's forces occupied the line between General Smith's left and General Ames' right, and to add to the force General Marston's brigade was ordered to cross Kettle run and Proctor's creek, and advance up the line of the railroad. General Turner had also been withdrawn from the right, as the bend in the river narrowed the line, and was transferred to the left of General Brooks' division. A portion of General Gillmore's command made a detour to the left of the railroad, in order to flank the enemy's position, while another portion moved directly up the line of the railroad to feign a direct attack. This movem
to the colored battery raised by General Butler. Wilson's wharf implies more than the name suggests. The wharf is one thing; the adjacent country quite another. The bluff rises somewhat abruptly, and then there is level land. Hereon our line was established, about a mile and a half in length, and thanks to the never-tiring energy of colored soldiers, has been well fortified. Yesterday about noon, Fitz Hugh Lee, now Major-General and commanding the cavalry of the Confederate army, vice Stuart, killed by Sheridan's men, appeared before the place with thousands of the Southern chivalry. With the courtesy of a Fitz Hugh, the characteristics of a gentlemen, and the arrogance of the southern planter, F. H. L., Major-General, sent into our lines and demanded a surrender, promising that in case his request or demand was complied with, the garrison should be sent to the authorities at Richmond as prisoners of war, but if refused he would not be answerable for the result. Chivalrous gen
Leroy Hammond (search for this): chapter 155
a party of men, went over to James river where a rebel schooner lay, made a raft of logs, went off to the boat, and set her on fire. It was thought that a torpedo was attached to her, and she had been floated down and anchored at that point. In the fight of Monday last, the three Massachusetts regiments were encountered by General Hazard's brigade, of South Carolina, their regiments being the same numbers, Twenty-three, Twenty-five and Twenty-seven. They were badly whipped, and Captain Leroy Hammond, who was mortally wounded, told one of the surgeons, before his death, If we had known you were veterans we wouldn't have charged so. It was like retribution. Friday dawned with alternate cloud and sunshine. General Butler's staff were early in the saddle, and galloped to the position of yesterday on the left of the pike. The disposition of the troops was at once made and the force put in motion. General Gillmore was to move from the left to the railroad at Chester Junction, t
and philosophically worked out the difficult problem. General Turner, with his division of the Tenth corps, held the extreme right, resting on James river, at Dr. Howlett's farm. General Weitzel held the centre, and General Brooks the left. Subsequently General Gillmore was sent to the left with a portion of his command, a brig country with too many guerrillas around, he prudently decided to remain with General Kautz. A report came to General Butler that torpedoes had been planted on Dr. Howlett's farm, and Major Ludlow of the staff was despatched with several orderlies to hunt them up, with the characteristic instruction from the General, If you find a shown by coast-survey chart, the draft of the monitors, and rebel torpedoes, it would be very difficult, if not impracticable, at present, to get up as high as Dr. Howlett's farm. In order to thoroughly remove obstructions, it would be necessary to control the left bank. The enemy now occupy, in considerable force, the high grou
lery. It extends from beyond the railroad across to the James. Riding out to the right, from the high land on the river we could see the rebel works at Chapin's Farm, on the north bank of the river, and supporting the works upon this side of the river. As our troops advanced with Heckman's brigade on the right of the pike, the rebels made an assault and charged them, but were no better pleased with the result than on former occasions. Steadily but surely our lines advanced, Follett's and Belger's batteries hitting their works from the Half-way House, where we now are. A drenching rain came, but operations were continued, General Butler being determined to push matters vigorously. General Weitzel quickly got his batteries, Follett's, Company D, Fourth United States, and Belge's, Company F, First Rhode Island, into position, using the embrasures from this side the enemy's intrenchments to fire through. A ride along the centre and right showed the enemy to be very strongly posted.
ide of the river. As our troops advanced with Heckman's brigade on the right of the pike, the rebels made an assault and charged them, but were no better pleased with the result than on former occasions. Steadily but surely our lines advanced, Follett's and Belger's batteries hitting their works from the Half-way House, where we now are. A drenching rain came, but operations were continued, General Butler being determined to push matters vigorously. General Weitzel quickly got his batteries, Follett's, Company D, Fourth United States, and Belge's, Company F, First Rhode Island, into position, using the embrasures from this side the enemy's intrenchments to fire through. A ride along the centre and right showed the enemy to be very strongly posted. On the left of the pike, General Brooks with his brigade occupies the rebel intrenchments, our men having about one foot and a half of level ground to stand upon between the ditch which surrounded the works and the embankment. Here th
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10