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ed on board the transports Georgia, Long Branch, Charleston, and Governor Hicks. The naval forces were under command of Commander Hooker, United States Navy, whose flagship was the Commodore Reed, together with the gunboats Fuchsia, Captain Street; Freeborn, Captain Arthurs, and the Teaser, Resolute, and Eureka. The land forces consisted of six hundred infantry, under the immediate charge of Captain Hart, Thirty-sixth United States cavalry volunteers, and fifty regular cavalry, under Lieutenant Denney. The naval land forces consisted of one hundred marines and sailors, under the charge of Captain Street, of the gunboat Fuchsia, assisted by Ensign Nelson and Assistant Engineer Delano, United States Navy. The combined forces landed at the mouth of Pope creek, in Westmoreland county, Virginia, some fifty miles above the mouth of the Potomac. On Sunday morning the forces took the direct route to Montrose, the county seat of Westmoreland, reaching that place safely, but in the town th
J. Kilpatrick (search for this): chapter 166
Captain Hart also burned some large mills filled with grain and flour. On this night the Colonel communicated with the gunboats, and they started at once around to meet us at Union wharf, on the Rappahannock. During Tuesday night and Wednesday morning there was constant firing on our pickets, and as we advanced to the Rappahannock, they seemed to get bolder. We, however, reached the Union wharf by evening, and at once proceeded to build or repair the wharf, which was destroyed by General Kilpatrick in his raid through this section of the country about one year ago. This was not accomplished until Friday night. On Thursday the enemy appeared in our rear, and the cavalry were at once made in readiness to advance, the Colonel taking command in person, Lieutenant Denny being seriously indisposed. They soon came up with him in the vicinity of Parsons' farm, some three miles from the wharf. As soon as in sight of the rebels (some thirty strong), the Colonel immediately ordered a char
ing over three hundred thousand dollars' worth of property, a large proportion of which belonged to the rebel government. The expedition consisted of both land and naval forces, the former under the command of Acting Brigadier-General Draper, commanding this post, accompanied by the following Staff: Captain P. H. Gibbs, Fourth Rhode Island, Assistant Adjutant General; Captain N. C. Goodwin, Quartermaster; Lieutenant A. Jenks, Aid-de-Camp; Lieutenant Scudder, Commissary of Subsistence; Lieutenant Jonley, Assistant Quartermaster; E. W. Walton, Surgeon. The land forces were conveyed on board the transports Georgia, Long Branch, Charleston, and Governor Hicks. The naval forces were under command of Commander Hooker, United States Navy, whose flagship was the Commodore Reed, together with the gunboats Fuchsia, Captain Street; Freeborn, Captain Arthurs, and the Teaser, Resolute, and Eureka. The land forces consisted of six hundred infantry, under the immediate charge of Captain Hart, Th
William C. Montgomery (search for this): chapter 166
, and spoke as kindly as though all was expected. There the force was divided, one party under the command of Captain Hart, proceeded to the Rappahannock direct, by way of the rich country called the Hague, while the main party, under the command of the Colonel in person, took the direct road to Warsaw, the county town of Richmond county. When within some two miles of the town, we met two or three rebel horsemen, who attempted to escape but failed, as we succeeded in capturing one Sergeant Montgomery, the enrolling officer of Richmond county. Before he would surrender, however, he had his horse shot from under him. The command now marched direct to Warsaw, and in the immediate vicinity captured a large quantity of clothing, freshly made for the rebel soldiers, together with tobacco, whiskey, and other blockade goods. At this place we encamped on Monday night. In the meantime a large lot of stock was sent with Captain Goodwin, Second Maryland, to take the transports at Nomani c
John Nelson (search for this): chapter 166
whose flagship was the Commodore Reed, together with the gunboats Fuchsia, Captain Street; Freeborn, Captain Arthurs, and the Teaser, Resolute, and Eureka. The land forces consisted of six hundred infantry, under the immediate charge of Captain Hart, Thirty-sixth United States cavalry volunteers, and fifty regular cavalry, under Lieutenant Denney. The naval land forces consisted of one hundred marines and sailors, under the charge of Captain Street, of the gunboat Fuchsia, assisted by Ensign Nelson and Assistant Engineer Delano, United States Navy. The combined forces landed at the mouth of Pope creek, in Westmoreland county, Virginia, some fifty miles above the mouth of the Potomac. On Sunday morning the forces took the direct route to Montrose, the county seat of Westmoreland, reaching that place safely, but in the town the cavalry discovered some rebels, who fired on them and escaped down a deep ravine. On Sunday night we encamped one mile south of Montrose, near the mansion
nd, Assistant Adjutant General; Captain N. C. Goodwin, Quartermaster; Lieutenant A. Jenks, Aid-de-Camp; Lieutenant Scudder, Commissary of Subsistence; Lieutenant Jonley, Assistant Quartermaster; E. W. Walton, Surgeon. The land forces were conveyed on board the transports Georgia, Long Branch, Charleston, and Governor Hicks. The naval forces were under command of Commander Hooker, United States Navy, whose flagship was the Commodore Reed, together with the gunboats Fuchsia, Captain Street; Freeborn, Captain Arthurs, and the Teaser, Resolute, and Eureka. The land forces consisted of six hundred infantry, under the immediate charge of Captain Hart, Thirty-sixth United States cavalry volunteers, and fifty regular cavalry, under Lieutenant Denney. The naval land forces consisted of one hundred marines and sailors, under the charge of Captain Street, of the gunboat Fuchsia, assisted by Ensign Nelson and Assistant Engineer Delano, United States Navy. The combined forces landed at the mou
Doc. 88. General Draper's expedition. Point Lookout, Md., June 21, 1864. The expedition that left here on Saturday night, June eleventh, has just returned, and proved to be a complete success, having had two engagements with the rebels, and destroying and capturing over three hundred thousand dollars' worth of property, a large proportion of which belonged to the rebel government. The expedition consisted of both land and naval forces, the former under the command of Acting Brigadier-General Draper, commanding this post, accompanied by the following Staff: Captain P. H. Gibbs, Fourth Rhode Island, Assistant Adjutant General; Captain N. C. Goodwin, Quartermaster; Lieutenant A. Jenks, Aid-de-Camp; Lieutenant Scudder, Commissary of Subsistence; Lieutenant Jonley, Assistant Quartermaster; E. W. Walton, Surgeon. The land forces were conveyed on board the transports Georgia, Long Branch, Charleston, and Governor Hicks. The naval forces were under command of Commander Hooker, U
R. T. M. Hunter (search for this): chapter 166
orses, sheep and cattle, a large number of which we succeeded in capturing. The country was highly cultivated; acres and acres of flowing grain presented itself to the eye. On the road we burned the large and extensive flouring mills of Colonel R. T. M. Hunter, late United States Senator, now a strong rebel. The mills were filled with Confederate flour; before they were consumed, a liberal portion was delivered to the poor families connected with these extensive estates. The forces then procbels advancing. We made a short turn (after securing all the stock), and made direct for the cover of the gunboats, the cavalry in the meantime burning all the mills containing Confederate flour, and visiting the extensive lands and mansion of Mr. Hunter. A large number of negroes left his plantation and followed us to the boats. We got our stock all on the transports, and started them again to Point Lookout. At Tappahannock we landed, and again had a skirmish with the rebels, we holding pos
re conveyed on board the transports Georgia, Long Branch, Charleston, and Governor Hicks. The naval forces were under command of Commander Hooker, United States Navy, whose flagship was the Commodore Reed, together with the gunboats Fuchsia, Captain Street; Freeborn, Captain Arthurs, and the Teaser, Resolute, and Eureka. The land forces consisted of six hundred infantry, under the immediate charge of Captain Hart, Thirty-sixth United States cavalry volunteers, and fifty regular cavalry, under Lieutenant Denney. The naval land forces consisted of one hundred marines and sailors, under the charge of Captain Street, of the gunboat Fuchsia, assisted by Ensign Nelson and Assistant Engineer Delano, United States Navy. The combined forces landed at the mouth of Pope creek, in Westmoreland county, Virginia, some fifty miles above the mouth of the Potomac. On Sunday morning the forces took the direct route to Montrose, the county seat of Westmoreland, reaching that place safely, but in the
P. H. Gibbs (search for this): chapter 166
he expedition that left here on Saturday night, June eleventh, has just returned, and proved to be a complete success, having had two engagements with the rebels, and destroying and capturing over three hundred thousand dollars' worth of property, a large proportion of which belonged to the rebel government. The expedition consisted of both land and naval forces, the former under the command of Acting Brigadier-General Draper, commanding this post, accompanied by the following Staff: Captain P. H. Gibbs, Fourth Rhode Island, Assistant Adjutant General; Captain N. C. Goodwin, Quartermaster; Lieutenant A. Jenks, Aid-de-Camp; Lieutenant Scudder, Commissary of Subsistence; Lieutenant Jonley, Assistant Quartermaster; E. W. Walton, Surgeon. The land forces were conveyed on board the transports Georgia, Long Branch, Charleston, and Governor Hicks. The naval forces were under command of Commander Hooker, United States Navy, whose flagship was the Commodore Reed, together with the gunboats
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