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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Doc. 2. the Red river dam. Early in the month of March 1864, a military expedition, comprising both branches of the service, set out on what was known as the Red River campaign. The army which took part in the movement was commanded by Major-General N. P. Banks; the navy by Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter. The disastrous battle of Sabine Cross Roads, fought April eighth, compelled the abandonment of the object of the expedition, which was the capture of Shreveport, and the army and navy fell back to Grand Ecore. Nothing now remained to be done but to take measures for relieving the squadron from the critical position in which it was placed by reason of the low water in the Red River. There was strong ground for apprehending that all the vessels under Admiral Porter's command, comprising some of the most effective iron-clads of the Mississippi fleet, would have to be destroyed to prevent their falling into the hands of the enemy. The capture or destruction of the squadron, with som
Grand Ecore (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
s Roads, fought April eighth, compelled the abandonment of the object of the expedition, which was the capture of Shreveport, and the army and navy fell back to Grand Ecore. Nothing now remained to be done but to take measures for relieving the squadron from the critical position in which it was placed by reason of the low water iarmy, if not its destruction, and would also for a time give the rebels control of the Mississippi. After the gunboats succeeded in passing over the bar near Grand Ecore, the army moved from there to Alexandria, having on the way several severe skirmishes with the enemy, and a battle at Monett's Bluffs, on Cane River. On the ars difficulty had been anticipated by many officers of the army, who were acquainted with the treacherous character of Red River navigation, before our return to Grand Ecore, and the idea had been suggested of rescuing the squadron by means of a dam. Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bailey, of Wisconsin, who had had much experience on the
Cane (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
nto the hands of the enemy. The capture or destruction of the squadron, with some two millions of dollars, would involve the blockade of the Red River, and great inconvenience to the army, if not its destruction, and would also for a time give the rebels control of the Mississippi. After the gunboats succeeded in passing over the bar near Grand Ecore, the army moved from there to Alexandria, having on the way several severe skirmishes with the enemy, and a battle at Monett's Bluffs, on Cane River. On the arrival of the fleet at the falls near Alexandria, which are about a mile in length, filled with rugged rocks, it was discovered that the water had fallen so low that it would be impossible for the vessels to pass them. This difficulty had been anticipated by many officers of the army, who were acquainted with the treacherous character of Red River navigation, before our return to Grand Ecore, and the idea had been suggested of rescuing the squadron by means of a dam. Lieutenant-
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
leet at the falls near Alexandria, which are about a mile in length, filled with rugged rocks, it was discovered that the water had fallen so low that it would be impossible for the vessels to pass them. This difficulty had been anticipated by many officers of the army, who were acquainted with the treacherous character of Red River navigation, before our return to Grand Ecore, and the idea had been suggested of rescuing the squadron by means of a dam. Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bailey, of Wisconsin, who had had much experience on the rivers of the North-west, and was familiar with the difficulties of swell-water navigation, consulted with Major-General William B. Franklin, commanding the Nineteenth army corps, on whose staff he was at the time, and submitted to him the plan of a tree-dam. No action was, however, taken until the arrival of the forces at Alexandria, when the matter was placed before General Banks, and the proposed plan explained in detail by Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey.
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Doc. 2. the Red river dam. Early in the month of March 1864, a military expedition, comprising both branches of the service, set out on what was known as the Red River campaign. The army which took part in the movement was commanded by Major-General N. P. Banks; the navy by Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter. The disastrous battle of Sabine Cross Roads, fought April eighth, compelled the abandonment of the object of the expedition, which was the capture of Shreveport, and the army and navy fell back to Grand Ecore. Nothing now remained to be done but to take measures for relieving the squadron from the critical position in which it was placed by reason of the low water in the Red River. There was strong ground for apprehending that all the vessels under Admiral Porter's command, comprising some of the most effective iron-clads of the Mississippi fleet, would have to be destroyed to prevent their falling into the hands of the enemy. The capture or destruction of the squadron, with so
Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
t five o'clock on the morning of the ninth, the pressure of the water became so great that it swept away two of the large coal barges that were sunk at the end of the dam near the centre of the river. When the accident was observed, the Admiral rode to the point where the upper vessels were anchored and ordered the Lexington to pass the upper falls, if possible, and immediately attempt to go through the opening in the dam, along which the water was rushing as fiercely as over the rapids at Niagara. The Lexington succeeded in getting over the falls and then steered directly for the opening in the dam, through which the water was dashing so furiously that it seemed as if certain destruction would be her fate. Ten thousand spectators breathlessly awaited the result. She entered the gap with a full head of steam; passed down the roaring, rushing torrent; made several spasmodic rolls ; hung for a moment, with a harsh, grating sound, on the rocks below; was then swept into deep water, a
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
thousand horses, mules, and oxen. Several hundred hardy lumbermen belonging to a regiment from Maine, were employed on the right, or north bank in felling trees, while an equal number were engaged ys of the daring De Soto, were falling to the ground under the blows of the stalwart pioneers of Maine, bearing with them in their fall trees of lesser growth; mules and oxen were dragging the trees,rt a space of time, and without any previous preparation. The Colonel of the Fifteenth regiment Maine volunteers testified before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, in January, 1865, that it was a very common thing among the lumbermen of Maine to build such dams, and that he had one hundred and fifty men in his regiment who could build just such a dam, a statement which we presume must beGeneral Franklin's staff; the Pioneer corps of the Thirteeenth army corps; Twenty-ninth regiment Maine volunteers; Twenty-third and Twenty-ninth Wisconsin volunteers; Seventy-seventh and One Hundred
David D. Porter (search for this): chapter 17
Doc. 2. the Red river dam. Early in the month of March 1864, a military expedition, comprising both branches of the service, set out on what was known as the Red River campaign. The army which took part in the movement was commanded by Major-General N. P. Banks; the navy by Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter. The disastrous battle of Sabine Cross Roads, fought April eighth, compelled the abandonment of the object of the expedition, which was the capture of Shreveport, and the army and navy fell back to Grand Ecore. Nothing now remained to be done but to take measures for relieving the squadron from the critical position in which it was placed by reason of the low water in the Red River. There was strong ground for apprehending that all the vessels under Admiral Porter's command, comprising some of the most effective iron-clads of the Mississippi fleet, would have to be destroyed to prevent their falling into the hands of the enemy. The capture or destruction of the squadron, with som
Charles C. Dwight (search for this): chapter 17
uadron testified their high appreciation of his inestimable services to them and the country, by presenting him with an elegant sword and a purse of three thousand dollars, which was transmitted to him with a highly complimentary letter from Admiral Porter. The officers and regiments who had the honor of assisting Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, and to whom he expresses in his report his deep sense of obligation, are as follows: Colonel James Grant Wilson, of General Banks' staff; Colonel Charles C. Dwight, Inspector-General Nineteenth army corps; Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Kinsey, One Hundred and Sixty-first regiment New York volunteers; Lieutenant-Colonel N. B. Pearsall, Ninety-seventh U. S. C. I.; Major Teutelle, of General Franklin's staff; Captains Harden, Harper, and Morison, of Ninety-seventh regiment U. S. C. I. ; Captain Stein, Sixteenth regiment Ohio volunteers; Lieutenant Williamson, of General Franklin's staff; the Pioneer corps of the Thirteeenth army corps; Twenty-ninth r
Annie Laurie (search for this): chapter 17
the dam; the thousand swarthy figures at work on land and water passing to and fro; the camp-fires of the army which surrounded us on every side; the loud commands of the officers super intending the work; the noisy shouts of the teamstears; the sound of the falling trees, and roaring of the rushing water, formed in its tout ensemble one of the most impressive scenes we ever witnessed. Mingled with these sounds we often heard as we passed on our rounds among the men, the sweet strains of Annie Laurie, or the martial notes of the Battle cry of freedom, while at the other end of the dam, among the dusky members of the Corps d'afrique, the popular refrain of John Brown's body lies a mouldering in the ground, and some of those peculiar and plaintive plantation melodies of the South, would greet us as we pursued our way. It was while on duty one night, when such a scene as we have attempted to describe presented itself to the looker-on, that a silvery-headed contraband, who had just come i
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