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Ivy station (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
ly repulsed by Colonel Thompson, who captured some of his men and finally arrived at his destination with all his own prisoners and some of Rosser's men besides. General Devin resumed his march at six A. M., leaving General Gibbs' brigade to destroy the iron bridge over the south fork of the Shenandoah, and to burn and destroy the captured wagons and their contents. General Custer moved on toward Charlottesville, destroying much government property and subsistence at Greenwood depot and Ivy station, also the railroad and the large bridge over Meacham's river, arriving at Charlottesville at four P. M., the mayor and several of the most prominent citizens meeting him in the suburbs of the city and delivering up the keys of the public buildings. The roads from Waynesboroa to Charlottesville had, from the incessant rains and spring thaws, become so terribly cut up, and the mud was of such a depth, that it was impossible for our train to reach Charlottesville under two days. I therefo
Butler, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
cross the South Anna. He sent his scouting parties up to within eleven miles of Richmond, where they burned a hospital train. The object of this move was to divert the attention of the enemy from the North and South Anna bridges and bridges over Little river, which Merritt was ordered to destroy with Devin's division; Custer's main column meanwhile being held at the Negro-foot crossing of the South Anna. General Merritt was ordered to follow the railroad to Hanover Junction, cross the Little river, and go into camp on the north bank of South Anna. In the attack upon the railroad bridge over the South Anna, the Fifth United States cavalry charged up to the bridge, dismounted, dashed across it, and drove away the company of artillery who tried to defend it, and turned their own guns--four twenty-pounder Parrotts — upon them. I here received a despatch from the Lieutenant-General that supplies were at the White House for me, and one brigade of infantry; and also captured the followi
Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
do so if I pushed boldly on toward Richmond, as he would be forced to come out and meet me near Ashland; then I could with-draw, cross South and North Anna and march to White House on north side of t General Custer was ordered to move by the Negro-foot crossing of the South Anna, and thence to Ashland, and General Devin was ordered to proceed to the same point. This developed the situation. The prisoners captured in front of Ashland reported Longstreet, with Pickett's and Johnson's divisions and Fitz Lee's cavalry, on the Ashland road, in the direction of Richmond, and four miles from AshAshland road, in the direction of Richmond, and four miles from Ashland. My course was now clear and the feint successful. General Devin was quickly ordered to the north side of the South Anna and General Custer was ordered to follow, sending Colonel Pennington's Ashland. My course was now clear and the feint successful. General Devin was quickly ordered to the north side of the South Anna and General Custer was ordered to follow, sending Colonel Pennington's brigade to amuse the enemy, cover his front, and gradually fall back. The whole command was, meanwhile, ordered to cross the North Anna and go into camp at Carmel church, and at daylight take up the
Rivanna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
chburg for the same purpose, to prevent troops massing on me from either Richmond or Lynchburg. A thorough and systematic destruction of the railroads was then commenced, including the large iron bridges over the north and south forks of the Rivanna river, and the work was continued until the evening of the fifth instant, when General Gibbs reported with our trains; forage and subsistence was found in great abundance in the vicinity of Charlottesville. Commodore Hollins of the confederate naves from Lynchburg, and then moved across the country and united with General Merritt's column at Newmarket. General Merritt started on the morning of the sixth, first sending the First Michigan cavalry, Colonel Maxwell commanding, down the Rivanna river to Palmyra and toward Columbia, with directions to rejoin him at Scottsville. General Merritt thoroughly accomplished his orders, destroying all large flour-mills, woollen factories, and manufacturing establishments, tearing up and demolishi
Beaver Dam (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
my command and prevent me from crossing the river. The railroad from Richmond to Gordonsville was still intact, and to go south of the Pamunkey river, and between it and Richmond, I regarded as too hazardous, and I was fearful that the enemy might use it to get on my flank and rear. General Custer was therefore directed to strike the railroad at Frederick's Hall and General Merritt at Louisa Court-house. General Custer was ordered to thoroughly destroy the track toward Richmond as far as Beaver Dam, while General Merritt did the same thing from Louisa. Court-house to Frederick's Hall. While at this latter place Major Young's scouts from Richmond notified me of preparations being made to prevent me from getting to the James river, and that Pickett's division of infantry was coming back from Lynchburg via the Southside railroad, as was also the cavalry, but that no advance from Richmond had yet taken place. I at once determined that there was no way to stop me unless General Longstre
Goochland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
ordonsville. I now had all the advantage, and by hurrying quickly down the canal and destroying it as near Richmond as Goochland or beyond, and then moving up to the railroad and destroying it as close up to the city as possible in the same manner return to Richmond. This conception was at once decided upon and Colonel Fitzhugh's brigade was ordered to proceed to Goochland and beyond, immediately, destroying every lock upon the canal and cutting the banks wherever practicable. The next mor we were rejoined by Colonel Fitzhugh's brigade. Colonel Fitzhugh had destroyed the canal about eight miles east of Goochland, thereby reducing it to a very small length. At Columbia we took one day's rest, and I here sent a communication to thfrom Lieutenant-General Early to General Lee, stating that he had been informed that Sheridan's forces were approaching Goochland, and that be intended to move up with two hundred cavalry which he had, and attack them in the flank at daylight. Gene
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
Doc. 110. Major-General Sheridan's report. Headquarters military division of the South-West, New Orleans, Louisiana, July 16, 1865. General — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of my command in the campaign from Winchester, in the Shenandoah valley, to the armies in front of Petersburg, beginning February twenty-seventh, and ending March twenty-eighth. The command consisted of the First and Third divisions of cavalry, of the Army of the Shenandoah, under the immediate command of Brevet Major-General Wesley Merritt, Brevet Major-General George A. Custer commanding the Third division, and Brigadier-General T. C. Devin, the first. The following was the effective force: Effective Force First and Third Cavalry Divisions, Army of the Shenandoah, February Twenty-eighth, 1865--Major-General Wesley Merritt, Chief of Cavalry.   commissioned officers. enlisted men. First cavalry division, Brigadier-General T. C. Devin, commanding 260 4,787 One
Edinburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
The command was in fine condition, but the weather was very bad, as the spring thaw, with heavy rains, had already come on. The valley and surrounding mountains were covered with snow which was fast disappearing, putting all the streams nearly past fording. On our first day's march we crossed Cedar creek, Tumbling river, and Tom's brook, and went into camp at Woodstock, having marched thirty miles. At six o'clock in the morning of the twenty-eighth instant the march was resumed through Edinburg and across the north fork of the Shenandoah river, and through Newmarket, going into camp at Lacey's spring, nine miles north of Harrisonburg; the crossing of the north fork of the Shenandoah was by a pontoon bridge. Small bands of guerrillas hovered on our flanks during the day, but no effort was made to drive them off, and no damage was done by them; distance marched, twenty-nine miles. The march was resumed at six o'clock on the morning of the twenty-ninth, through Harrisonburg and Mou
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
Columbia we took one day's rest, and I here sent a communication to the Lieutenant-General commanding the armies, notifying him of our success, position, and condition, and requesting supplies to be sent to White House. My anxiety now was to be able to cross the Pamunkey. I felt confident that the enemy would march out a heavy force and try to destroy my command and prevent me from crossing the river. The railroad from Richmond to Gordonsville was still intact, and to go south of the Pamunkey river, and between it and Richmond, I regarded as too hazardous, and I was fearful that the enemy might use it to get on my flank and rear. General Custer was therefore directed to strike the railroad at Frederick's Hall and General Merritt at Louisa Court-house. General Custer was ordered to thoroughly destroy the track toward Richmond as far as Beaver Dam, while General Merritt did the same thing from Louisa. Court-house to Frederick's Hall. While at this latter place Major Young's scouts
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 200
ral railroad, the James river canal, capture Lynchburg, if practicable, and then join Major-Generalmind whether I should pursue my course on to Lynchburg, leaving General Early in my rear, or go outailroad, and also about fifteen miles toward Lynchburg for the same purpose, to prevent troops massing on me from either Richmond or Lynchburg. A thorough and systematic destruction of the railroadr as Amherst Court-house, sixteen miles from Lynchburg, and then moved across the country and uniteicksburg railroads, connecting Richmond with Lynchburg and Gordonsville. I now had all the advanta as possible in the same manner I did toward Lynchburg, I felt convinced I was striking a hard blowides leaving the troops now concentrating at Lynchburg without anything to oppose them, and forcing's division of infantry was coming back from Lynchburg via the Southside railroad, as was also the on the Central railroad between Richmond and Lynchburg, except the one over the Chickahominy and th[4 more...]
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