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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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December 5th (search for this): chapter 84
condition of the forces was not such as to warrant the commencement of offensive operations immediately, the first duty to be provided for was the safety of Nashville against assault. For this purpose a line of strong intrenchments, strengthened with an abatis, slashes of timber, and pointed stakes planted firmly in the ground, was constructed along the entire front of the corps. The entire development of this work was something over two miles. It was completed by the morning of the fifth of December. But while the safety of Nashville was being provided for, preparations were also being made for offensive operations. The troops were rapidly re-equipped in every particular, the trains repaired and loaded with supplies, etc. As early as the seventh of December, the commanding General of the forces had begun to communicate to the corps commanders his plan of attack, and had intimated that the morning of the tenth would witness the inauguration of offensive operations. But the morni
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 84
received to take post at this place. On the thirty-first, the corps marched to Elk River, a distance of fifteen miles. The river being too swollen to ford, two days were spent in bridging it. Colonel Suman, Ninth Indiana, and Major Watson, Seventy-fifth Illinois, using the pioneers of the corps as laborers and mechanics, built a substantial trestle-bridge three hundred and nine feet long, over which the corps, with its artillery and wagons, safely passed. Elk River was crossed on the third of January, and on the fifth the corps encamped in the vicinity of this place. Thus was closed, for the Fourth corps, one of the most remarkable campaigns of the war. The enemy, superior in numbers, had been driven by assault, in utter rout and demoralization, from strongly-intrenched positions, pursued more than a hundred miles, and forced to recross the Tennessee River. By actual capture on the field of battle, and by abandonment in his flight, the enemy lost three fourths of his artillery;
December 14th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 84
ops will be formed in time to commence operations at six o'clock A. M., or as soon thereafter as practicable. To carry out these brief but sententious and pointed instructions of the commanding General, I directed, so soon as I had returned to my headquarters, the division commanders to assemble there at seven P. M., and, after explaining to them fully the intended movements, delivered to them the following written orders: headquarters Fourth Army corps, near Nashville, Tenn., December 14, 1864. Orders of the day for the Fourth Army Corps, for to-morrow, December 15, 1864. II. Reveille will be sounded at four A. M.; the troops will get their breakfast, break up their camp, pack up everything, and be prepared to move at six A. M. II. Brigadier-General Elliott, commanding Second division, will move out by his right, taking the small road that passes by the right of his present position, form in echelon with General A. J. Smith's left, slightly refusing his own left, and,
December 7th (search for this): chapter 84
slashes of timber, and pointed stakes planted firmly in the ground, was constructed along the entire front of the corps. The entire development of this work was something over two miles. It was completed by the morning of the fifth of December. But while the safety of Nashville was being provided for, preparations were also being made for offensive operations. The troops were rapidly re-equipped in every particular, the trains repaired and loaded with supplies, etc. As early as the seventh of December, the commanding General of the forces had begun to communicate to the corps commanders his plan of attack, and had intimated that the morning of the tenth would witness the inauguration of offensive operations. But the morning of the ninth dawned upon us, bringing. a heavy sleet-storm, which soon covered the whole face of the earth with a perfect mer de glace, and rendered all movement of troops, so long as it remained, impossible. The weather and condition of the ground were not s
December 14th (search for this): chapter 84
un to communicate to the corps commanders his plan of attack, and had intimated that the morning of the tenth would witness the inauguration of offensive operations. But the morning of the ninth dawned upon us, bringing. a heavy sleet-storm, which soon covered the whole face of the earth with a perfect mer de glace, and rendered all movement of troops, so long as it remained, impossible. The weather and condition of the ground were not sufficiently ameliorated before midday of the fourteenth of December to permit the commencement of operations with any hope of success. The commanding General summoned a meeting of corps commanders at his headquarters at three P. M., on the fourteenth, and delivered to them written orders, from which the following are extracts: As soon as the weather will admit of offensive operations, the troops will move against the enemy's position in the following order: * * * * * * III. Brigadier-General T. J. Wood, commanding the Fourth corps, after
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