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Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for John E. Cook or search for John E. Cook in all documents.

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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 7: the blow struck. (search)
turnal meetings — were watched, overpowered, and deprived of every chance to join their heroic liberators. Having sent off the women who lived at their cabins --Cook's wife and others — the neighbors began to talk about the singularity of the proceeding; and it became necessary, on that account also, to precipitate an attack on, and the plan of operations discussed. On Sunday evening, a council was again convened, and the programme of the Captain unanimously approved. In closing, wrote Cook, John Brown said: And now, gentlemen, let me press this one thing on your minds. You all know how dear life is to you, and how dear your lives are to your fas granted to him, at three o'clock, to pass over with his train, refused to do so till he could see for himself that all was safe. After taking the town, says Cook, I was placed under Captain Stevens, who received orders to proceed to the house of Colonel Lewis Washington, and to take him prisoner, and to bring his slaves, ho
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: sword in hand. (search)
Captain Brown and his sons Oliver and Watson, Stevens and two others, were stationed inside of the Armory grounds; Kagi, with Leeman, Stewart Taylor, Anderson, (black,) and Copeland, (colored,) held the lower part of the town and the rifle works; Cook, Owen Brown, Tidd, Merriam, and Barclay Coppoc were stationed at the cabins of the Kennedy Farm and the school house; while the remainder were posted as guards at the bridges and at the corners of the streets and the public buildings. Early inerators in the engine house were Captain Brown, Jerry Anderson, Edwin Coppoc, and Shields Green, the negro. Eight Virginia hostages, and a small number of armed negroes, were with them. Where were the others, and what had they been doing? John E. Cook, in his Confession, thus stated their position: When we returned from the capture of Washington, I staid a short time in the engine house to get warm, as I was chilled through. After I got warm, Captain Brown ordered me to go with C. P.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 10: spoils of war. (search)
f war. Some time after the capture of the Liberators, a negro, held in bondage by Colonel Washington, reported that Captain Cook was in the mountains, only three miles off. Scouting parties went out in search of him, but all of them returned unsucascertained, reports to the contrary notwithstanding, that many negroes in the neighborhood, who had been tampered with by Cook and others of Brown's gang, had at least cognizance of the plans of the marauders, if they did not sympathize with them. ill rise again — with the slaves. Capture of the arms. The Independent Grays of Baltimore, who went out in search of Cook,-- for the Virginians did not dare to venture beyond the parade ground,--returned in two ours with the arms and ammunitionge on the deserted school house] had scarcely subsided, when another alarm was given, that the notorious insurgent leader, Cook, had a few minutes before been seen upon the mountains on the Maryland shore. A scouting party, consisting of several mem
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, chapter 2.44 (search)
e statements, with regard to the negroes, are in all probability false. The Virginians, who had not dared to fight them armed, mustered courage to insult them when manacled. On the same evening there was another panic at Harper's Ferry: it was Cook, this time, who was murdering all the people at Sandy Hook! The marines hastened out to protect the citizens, but found neither Cook nor a broil there. When they returned to Harper's Ferry, the Virginia militia, who had been afraid to follow, noCook nor a broil there. When they returned to Harper's Ferry, the Virginia militia, who had been afraid to follow, now valiantly offered to go out to defend their fellow-citizens. But the limits of this volume will not permit me to recount how often and pusillanimously the Virginians acted. From the arrest of the Liberators till the death of their Chief, the shivering chivalry of the once gallant State of Virginia suffered from a chronic but ludicrously painful fright. Governor Wise and Mr. Hunter accompanied the prisoners to Charlestown, where they were lodged in jail, and placed under the charge of Ca
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: Judicial alacrity. (search)
Brown. But why? Because they had not time to know his design, and to act, ere their heroic liberators were either killed or imprisoned. But one negro, I know,--a slave of Washington,--whom Governor Wise pretended had probably been killed by Captain Cook in endeavoring to return home, was shot in the river as he was fighting for freedom. I know this fact from one of John Brown's men who saw him. I have positive knowledge, also, of sixteen slaves who succeeded in escaping from Harper's Ferry. not having the fear of God before their eyes, but moved and seduced by the false and malignant counsels of others, and the instigations of the devil, did each severally, maliciously, and feloniously conspire with each other, and with a certain John E. Cook, John Kagi, Charles Tidd, and others to the Jurors unknown, to induce certain slaves, to wit, Jim, Sam, Mason, and Catesby . ... the slaves and property of Lewis W. Washington, and Henry, Levi, Ben, Jerry, Phil, George, and Bill, the slaves an
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: State evidence closed. (search)
Chapter 4: State evidence closed. Here was great exultation in Charlestown on Friday, October 28. John E. Cook was brought in as a prisoner, by men who, in a Free State, betrayed and seized him, for the price of his blood, previously offered by Governor Wise. But until this record of the outrage called the trial of John Brown be completed, I will not divert the attention of the reader to the fears and hopes, the crimes and prayers which were agitating the world outside of the Court House and the Jail of Charlestown. On Friday morning, Mr. Hoyt, a young Boston lawyer, arrived as a volunteer counsel for John Brown; and, although declining to act until he obtained a knowledge of the case, was qualified as a member of the bar. The testimony for the prosecution was resumed. Colonel Washington, recalled, stated that he heard Captain Brown frequently complain of the bad faith of the people by firing on his men when under a flag of truce; but he heard him make no threat, nor utte
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: forty days in chains. (search)
window, and listens all day to the Captain's words, seldom offering a syllable except when called upon. Sometimes he gets a little excited, and springs forward to make clear some point about which I the Captaina is in doubt; but his five bullets, in head and breast, weigh him down, and he is soon exhausted. As for the other men,--Copeland, Green, and Coppic,they are always sending messages to the Captain, assuring him that it was not they who confessed, and he mustn't growl at them, but at Cook. I cannot forget hearing Brown express himself on the subject of the threatening anonymous letters that have been received by (Gov. Wise relating to his case. Well, gentlemen, he said, I tell you what I think of them. They come from no friends of mine. I have nothing to do with such friends. Why, gentlemen, of all the things in the world that I despise, anonymous letters are the worst. If I had a little job to do, I would sooner take one half the men I brought down here to help me than
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 11: the victory over death. (search)
he had no more use for money, and bade them adieu. He then visited Cook and Coppoc, who were chained together, and remarked to Cook: You haCook: You have made false statements. Cook asked: What do you mean? Brown answered: Why, by stating that I sent you to Harper's Ferry. Cook reCook asked: What do you mean? Brown answered: Why, by stating that I sent you to Harper's Ferry. Cook replied: Did you not tell me in Pittsburg to come to Harper's Ferry and see if Forbes had made any disclosures? Brown: No, sir; you knew I pCook replied: Did you not tell me in Pittsburg to come to Harper's Ferry and see if Forbes had made any disclosures? Brown: No, sir; you knew I protested against your coming. Cook replied: Captain Brown, we remember differently, at the same time dropping his head. Brown then turCook replied: Captain Brown, we remember differently, at the same time dropping his head. Brown then turned to Coppic and said: Coppoc, you also made false statements, but I am glad to hear you have contradicted them. Stand up like a man. He all in which his body had been confined. From the windows of his cell Cook had an unobstructed view of the whole proceedings. He watched his o be stored up against the 16th instant, when it will be used to hang Cook and Coppic together. A separate gallows will be built for the two n
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