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Deerfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
on, had rendered him, the old man said, as his eye flashed and his voice grew sterner, a maniac — yes, a maniac. He paused a few seconds, wiped a tear from his eye, and continued his narration: At Black Jack, the invading Missourians wounded three free state men, one of them my son-in-law; and, a few days afterwards, one of my sons was so wounded that he will be a cripple for life. In August, I was present and saw the mangled and disfigured body of the murdered Hoyt, of Deerfield, Massachusetts, brought into our camp. I knew him well. I saw the ruins of many free state men's houses in different parts of the Territory, together with grain in the stack, burning, and wasted in other ways, to the amount, at least, of fifty thousand dollars. I saw several other free state men, besides those I have named, during the summer, who were badly wounded by the invaders of the Territory. I know that for much of the time during the summer, the travel over portions of the Ter
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
ain invaded by organized marauders from the Southern States. A Joint Committee was appointed by the General Court to consider the petitions in favor of a State appropriation. It held its sittings publicly. Eminent champions of freedom in Massachusetts, and men who had distinguished themselves during the conflict in Kansas, were invited to address the Committee. Among the Kansas men was Captain John Brown, who, on the 18th of February, appeared at the capitol to make a statement of his vieo much to fear any things human. the chairman — What is your opinion as to the probability of a renewal of hostilities in Kansas--of another invasion; and what do you think would be the effect, on the free state men, of an appropriation by Massachusetts? Captain Brown--Whenever we heard, out in Kansas, that the North was doing any thing for us, we were encouraged and strengthened to struggle on. As to the probability of another invasion, I do not know. We ought to be prepared for the wor
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
f and family than he otherwise would do. He then read the following statement in a clear, ringing tone: Speech to the Legislature. I saw, while in Missouri, in the fall of 1855, large numbers of men going to Kansas to vote, and also returning after they had so done: as they said. Later in the year, I, with four be whipped, coaxed, nor driven into a fight, and that one pro-slavery man could whip a dozen abolitionists. They said that Kansas must be a Slave State to save Missouri from abolition; that both must stand or fall together. They did not hesitate to threaten that they would burn, kill, scalp, and drive out the entire free state w, than they did last year at this time. You ought to remember that, from the date of the Shannon treaty till May last, there was perfect quiet in Kansas; no fear of a renewal of hostilities; no violence offered to our citizens in Missouri. I frequently went there myself; was known there; yet treated with the greatest kindness.
Prairie City (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
ed about the head, and with his throat partly cut, after he had been dragged, sick, from the house of Ottawa Jones, and thrown over the bank of the Ottawa Creek for dead. About the first of September, I, and five sick and wounded sons, and a son-in-law, were obliged to lie on the ground, without shelter, for a considerable time, and at times almost in a state of starvation, and dependent on the charity of the Christian Indian I have before named, and his wife. I saw Dr. Graham, of Prairie City, who was a prisoner with the ruffians on the 2d of June, and was present when they wounded him, in an attempt to kill him, s he was trying to save himself from being murdered by them during the fight at Black Jack. I know that numerous other persons, whose names I cannot now remember, suffered like hardships and exposures to those I have mentioned. I know well that on or about the 14th of September, 1856, a large force of Missourians and other ruffians, said by Governor Geary to be
Lecompton (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
them, they, on the same day, made their appearance in full view of, and within about a mile of Lawrence; and I know of no reason why they did not attack that place, except that about one hundred free state men volunteered to go out, and did go out on the open plain before the town, and give them the offer of a fight; which, after getting scattering shots from our men, they declined, and retreated back towards Franklin. I saw that whole thing. The government troops, at this time, were at Lecompton, a distance of twelve miles only from Lawrence, with Governor Geary; and yet, notwithstanding runners had been dispatched to advise him, in good time, of the approach and setting out of the enemy, (who had to march some forty miles to reach Lawrence,) he did not, on that memorable occasion, get a single soldier on the ground until after the enemy had retreated to Franklin, and been gone for more than five hours. This is the way he saved Lawrence. (Laughter.) And it is just the kind of pr
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
e of how much the National Government had expended in endeavoring to fasten Slavery on Kansas; and asked why these politicians had never cried out, Save the people's money! when it was expended to trample under the foot of the peculiar crime of the south, the rights, lives, and property of the Northern squatters. They were silent then. (Applause.) the chairman--Captain Brown, I wish to ask you regarding Buford's men. Colonel Buford was the leader of several companies of Georgia and Alabama bandits, who came to Kansas, in the spring of 1856, with the avowed intention of expelling or exterminating the emigrants from the North. Did you ever mingle with them? And if so, what did you see or hear? Captain Brown replied, that he saw a great deal of them at first; that they spoke without hesitation before him, because he employed himself as a surveyor; and, as nearly all the surveyors were pro-slavery men, they probably thought he was sound on the goose. Western phrase: equiv
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
f the North, and the rights of her citizens in Kansas, if the Territory should be again invaded by oistinguished themselves during the conflict in Kansas, were invited to address the Committee. Amonghe fall of 1855, large numbers of men going to Kansas to vote, and also returning after they had so sas River. I have not yet told all I saw in Kansas. I once saw three mangled bodies, two of whthe first. These things the old man saw in Kansas. He concluded his remarks by denouncing thed expended in endeavoring to fasten Slavery on Kansas; and asked why these politicians had never crild whip a dozen abolitionists. They said that Kansas must be a Slave State to save Missouri from ab in conclusion, about the emigrants needed for Kansas. We want, he said, good men, industrious mes? Captain Brown--Whenever we heard, out in Kansas, that the North was doing any thing for us, weeaty till May last, there was perfect quiet in Kansas; no fear of a renewal of hostilities; no viole[2 more...]
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
nsas, if the Territory should be again invaded by organized marauders from the Southern States. A Joint Committee was appointed by the General Court to consider the petitions in favor of a State appropriation. It held its sittings publicly. Eminent champions of freedom in Massachusetts, and men who had distinguished themselves during the conflict in Kansas, were invited to address the Committee. Among the Kansas men was Captain John Brown, who, on the 18th of February, appeared at the capitol to make a statement of his views. The writer was present at this sitting, and reported the old man's speech. Captain Brown, as he stepped forward, was received with applause. He said he intended to speak exclusively of matters of which he was personally cognizant; and, therefore, the committee must excuse him if he should refer more particularly to himself and family than he otherwise would do. He then read the following statement in a clear, ringing tone: Speech to the L
Ottawa, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
twenty bullet and buck shot holes in him, after the two murdered men had lain on the ground, to be worked at by flies, for some eighteen hours. One of these young men was my own son. The stern old man faltered. He struggled long to suppress all exhibition of his feelings; and soon, but with a subdued, and in a faltering tone, continued: I saw Mr. Parker, whom I well know, all bruised about the head, and with his throat partly cut, after he had been dragged, sick, from the house of Ottawa Jones, and thrown over the bank of the Ottawa Creek for dead. About the first of September, I, and five sick and wounded sons, and a son-in-law, were obliged to lie on the ground, without shelter, for a considerable time, and at times almost in a state of starvation, and dependent on the charity of the Christian Indian I have before named, and his wife. I saw Dr. Graham, of Prairie City, who was a prisoner with the ruffians on the 2d of June, and was present when they wounded him, in
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.27
iled estimate of how much the National Government had expended in endeavoring to fasten Slavery on Kansas; and asked why these politicians had never cried out, Save the people's money! when it was expended to trample under the foot of the peculiar crime of the south, the rights, lives, and property of the Northern squatters. They were silent then. (Applause.) the chairman--Captain Brown, I wish to ask you regarding Buford's men. Colonel Buford was the leader of several companies of Georgia and Alabama bandits, who came to Kansas, in the spring of 1856, with the avowed intention of expelling or exterminating the emigrants from the North. Did you ever mingle with them? And if so, what did you see or hear? Captain Brown replied, that he saw a great deal of them at first; that they spoke without hesitation before him, because he employed himself as a surveyor; and, as nearly all the surveyors were pro-slavery men, they probably thought he was sound on the goose. Western p
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