hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Kansas (Kansas, United States) 450 0 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 243 1 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 146 0 Browse Search
J. H. Kagi 138 2 Browse Search
Ilva (Italy) 104 0 Browse Search
Aaron C. Stevens 103 1 Browse Search
Clay Pate 96 0 Browse Search
Lawrence, Kansas (Kansas, United States) 92 2 Browse Search
John E. Cook 86 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. Search the whole document.

Found 425 total hits in 105 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
individuals. I will endeavor to make a judicious and faithful application of all such means as I may be supplied with. Contributions may be sent, in drafts, to W. H. D. Calender, Cashier State Bank, Hartford, Conn. It is my intention to visit as many places as I can during my stay in the States, provided I am informed of the disposition of the inhabitants to aid me in my efforts, as well as to receive my visit. Information may be communicated to me, (care of Massasoit House,) at Springfield, Mass. Will editors of newspapers, friendly to the cause, kindly second the measure, and also give this some half dozen insertions? Will either gentlemen or ladies, or both, volunteer to take up the business? It is with no little sacrifice of personal feeling I appear in this manner before the public. John Brown. In February, when in Collinsville, Connecticut, he ordered the manufacture of his pikes. I remember that, when in Boston, he spoke with great contempt of Sharpe's rifles as
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
s were left unfinished at this time; but, in the following year, in the month of June, John Brown was again in Collinsville, and completed the contract, and in August, under the name of J. Smith and Sons, ordered them to be forwarded to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, upon which they were transported across the country to Harper's Ferry. In March and April, Captain Brown made an agreement with a drill-master, named Hugh Forbes, all Englishman, and a Revolutionary exile, to instruct a number of ydred revolvers of the Massachusetts Arms patent, all of which we transported across the State of Iowa to Springdale, and from there to Liberty, at which place they were shipped for Ashtabula County, Ohio, where they remained till brought to Chambersburg, Pa., and were from there transported to a house in Washington County, Md., which Captain Brown had rented for six months, and which was situated about five miles from Harper's Ferry. It was the intention of Captain Brown to sell his teams in S
St. Joseph, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
, and Kagi. Left Topeka for Nebraska City, and camped at night on the prairie north-east of Topeka. Here, for the first, I learned that we were to leave Kansas to attend a military school during the winter. It was the intention of the party to go to Ashtabula County, Ohio Next morning I was sent back to Lawrence to get a draft of eighty dollars cashed, and to get Parsons, Realf, and Hinton to go back with me. I got the draft cashed. Captain Brown had given me orders to take boat to St. Joseph, Mo., and stage from there to Tabor, Iowa, where he would remain for a few days. I had to wait for Realf for three or four days; Hinten, could not leave at that time. I started with Realf and Parsons on a stage for Leavenworth. The boats had stopped running on account of the ice. Staid one day in Leavenworth, and then left for Westen, where we took stage for St. Joseph, and from thence to Tabor. I found C. P. Tidd and Leeman at Tabor. Our party now consisted of Captain John Brown, Owen
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
to drill a select number of the young men of Kansas, who had proved themselves faithful to principle. He well knew, from his power over men, that, should the Kansas difficulties cease, the youths thus drilled would follow him to Harper's Ferry, which, for many years, he had selected as the grand point of attack on slavery. John Brown in Boston. I met John Brown in Boston in January, 1857; and many of the facts of this volume he told me at that period. To a gentleman of note in Massachusetts, who made his acquaintance at that time, I am indebted for the reminiscences that follow: He brought me a letter of introduction in January, 1857. His business was to raise money for the purpose of further protecting the Free State men of Kansas; and for this purpose he desired to equip one hundred mounted men. His son Owen accompanied him. He immediately impressed me as a person of no common order, and every day that I saw him strengthened this impression. . . . His brown coat of
St. Joseph (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
rsons, Realf, and Hinton to go back with me. I got the draft cashed. Captain Brown had given me orders to take boat to St. Joseph, Mo., and stage from there to Tabor, Iowa, where he would remain for a few days. I had to wait for Realf for three or four days; Hinten, could not leave at that time. I started with Realf and Parsons on a stage for Leavenworth. The boats had stopped running on account of the ice. Staid one day in Leavenworth, and then left for Westen, where we took stage for St. Joseph, and from thence to Tabor. I found C. P. Tidd and Leeman at Tabor. Our party now consisted of Captain John Brown, Owen Brown, A. D. Stephens, Charles Moffitt, C. P. Tidd, Richard Robertson, Col. Richard Realf, L. F. Parsons, William Leeman, and myself. We stopped some days at Tabor, making preparations to start. Here ce found that Captain Brown's ultimate destination was the State of Virginia. Some warm words passed between him and myself in regard to the plan, which I had supposed was
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
rice heard him repeat this sentiment, which I particularly noticed at the time. He staid but a short time in Boston; but returned in February, and soon after appeared before a committee of the Massachusetts Legislature. .... In March he visited Concord, and spoke at a public meeting in the Town Hall, where, I am told, he exhibited the chain worn by his son John in Kansas, and, with a gesture and voice never to be forgotten by those who heard him, denounced the administration and the South for their work in Kansas. He spent several days in Concord, and made the acquaintance of many of its citizens; among others, of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry D. Thoreau, who have testified so clearly to his nobility of character. Near the end of March, 1857, being on my way to Washington, I met Capt. Brown in New York City, and spent a night with him at the Metropolitan Hotel. Capt. Brown objected to the show and extravagance of such an establishment, and said he preferred a plain tavern, wher
Westfield Reservoir (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
n and arms to Lane, but adds that they proved a failure. On the 1st of October the journalist visits Nebraska City with Mr. Jones and Carpenter. October 3d proves a lucky date to the writer, who records the receipt then of seventy-two dollars from friend Sanborn. The succeeding day (Sunday) our journalist improves his leisure by perusing speech of Judge Curtis, delivered before the students of Union College, New Jersey, and of Dartmouth College, and at the Normal School Convention, Westfield, Mass., and at Brown University, R. I. ; the entry of the same date continues, Read of the awful disaster to the Central America, formerly the George Law; read answer of the Connecticut men to Buchanan, and had to shed a few tears over it. On Nov. 4, the journalist rose at ten minutes before four o'clock, elate with the remembrance that he is thirty-three years old this day. John Brown reached Tabor on the 7th of August, and Colonel Forbes, two days after him. They were obliged to remai
Tabor (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
military science. Forbes engaged to be at Tabor, in Iowa, in June, to meet John Brown and his men tAug. 9 records the arrival of Col. Forbes, (at Tabor,) who from the frequent mention made of that wree years old this day. John Brown reached Tabor on the 7th of August, and Colonel Forbes, two ven by one of his sons. He left two others at Tabor. Here Cook's Confession (which, although fato St. Joseph, Mo., and stage from there to Tabor, Iowa, where he would remain for a few days. I h took stage for St. Joseph, and from thence to Tabor. I found C. P. Tidd and Leeman at Tabor. OurTabor. Our party now consisted of Captain John Brown, Owen Brown, A. D. Stephens, Charles Moffitt, C. P. Tiddm Leeman, and myself. We stopped some days at Tabor, making preparations to start. Here ce found re so anxious that we should go with them. At Tabor we procured teams for the transportation of abpe's rifles, which had been taken on as far as Tabor, one year before, at which place they had been[1 more...]
Cleveland (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
tice to Mr. Brown, state that, when not under excitement or mental derangement, he has ever manifested to me a kind, benevolent, and humane disposition, as a man of strict integrity, moral and religious worth. Affidavit of S. N. Goodale, of Cleveland, Ohio. Another person, who also met John Brown in the cars at this time, subsequently said that he regarded him as a monomaniac; and his chief reason was, that the old man spoke of the Eastern people generally as criminally lukewarm on the sub of Jason Jones, Notary public. The first entry, of Aug. 25, states that the writer started at a certain date in June for Tabor, from Akron to Hudson; got goods at Henrichs, &c. ; harness ; bought red mail stage at Jerries ; next day went to Cleveland; shipped chest by express; staid at Bennett's Temperance House; next day went to church through the day and evening. July 4, the entry is, Father left for Iowa City, where he was joined by Jason, on h the 5th, who records a meeting with Dr.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
rs old this day. John Brown reached Tabor on the 7th of August, and Colonel Forbes, two days after him. They were obliged to remain there, inactive, till the 2d of November, in consequence of being out of funds. During this interval of suspense, writes Col. Forbes, Captain Brown advocated the adoption of his plan, and I supported mine of stampedes. The conclusion arrived at was, that he renounced his Harper's Ferry project, and I consented to cooperate in stampedes in Virginia and Maryland instead of the part of the country I indicated as the most suitable. I perceived, however, that his mind constantly wandered back to Harper's Ferry, and it was not till it had been definitely settled that neither of us should do any thing unless under the direction or with the consent of a committee, that I felt easy in my mind respecting his curious notions of Harper's Ferry. He was very pious, and had been deeply impressed for many years with the Bible Story of Gideon, believing that h
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...