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Ilva (Italy) (search for this): chapter 2.28
have a poor little ewe that has fallen into the ditch, and I think the Sabbath is as good a day as any to help her out. I will come. Travels in the Eastern States. The winter and spring of 1857 John Brown spent in travelling. He visited North Elba once. He spoke at different cities, and employed all his energies in collecting money. I believe that a large sum was voted for his use by the National Kansas Committee; but I know that- it is said through the dishonesty of an agent — he recee subject ! That it is true that John Brown was not fully satisfied with the results of his trip to the east, may be seen by the following characteristic note, which was found in his own handwriting among the papers left at the homestead of North Elba. It is entitled: Old Brown's Farewell To the Plymouth Rocks, Bunker Hill Monuments, Charter Oaks, and Uncle Thom's Cabbins. He has left for Kansas. Has been trying since he came out of the Territory to secure an outfit, or in other word
Central America (search for this): chapter 2.28
. Jones and Carpenter. October 3d proves a lucky date to the writer, who records the receipt then of seventy-two dollars from friend Sanborn. The succeeding day (Sunday) our journalist improves his leisure by perusing speech of Judge Curtis, delivered before the students of Union College, New Jersey, and of Dartmouth College, and at the Normal School Convention, Westfield, Mass., and at Brown University, R. I. ; the entry of the same date continues, Read of the awful disaster to the Central America, formerly the George Law; read answer of the Connecticut men to Buchanan, and had to shed a few tears over it. On Nov. 4, the journalist rose at ten minutes before four o'clock, elate with the remembrance that he is thirty-three years old this day. John Brown reached Tabor on the 7th of August, and Colonel Forbes, two days after him. They were obliged to remain there, inactive, till the 2d of November, in consequence of being out of funds. During this interval of suspense, w
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
throughout the United States, in the firm belief that his call will not go unheeded. I ask all honest lovers of liberty and human rights, both male and female, to hold up my hands by contributions of pecuniary aid, either as counties, cities, towns, villages, societies, churches, or individuals. I will endeavor to make a judicious and faithful application of all such means as I may be supplied with. Contributions may be sent, in drafts, to W. H. D. Calender, Cashier State Bank, Hartford, Conn. It is my intention to visit as many places as I can during my stay in the States, provided I am informed of the disposition of the inhabitants to aid me in my efforts, as well as to receive my visit. Information may be communicated to me, (care of Massasoit House,) at Springfield, Mass. Will editors of newspapers, friendly to the cause, kindly second the measure, and also give this some half dozen insertions? Will either gentlemen or ladies, or both, volunteer to take up the business?
Henry D. Thoreau (search for this): chapter 2.28
ever to be forgotten by those who heard him, denounced the administration and the South for their work in Kansas. He spent several days in Concord, and made the acquaintance of many of its citizens; among others, of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry D. Thoreau, who have testified so clearly to his nobility of character. Near the end of March, 1857, being on my way to Washington, I met Capt. Brown in New York City, and spent a night with him at the Metropolitan Hotel. Capt. Brown objected to ther, also, said to a friend of mine, who spoke of Captain Montgomery as a man of more harmonious and cultivated intellect than John Brown, Do you know what you say, sir? John Brown is one of the most extraordinary men of this age and nation. Henry D. Thoreau styled him a true transcendentalist. Mr. Stearns, an active and generous friend of Kansas, tells two incidents of John Brown's visit to Boston at this time, which are exceedingly characteristic of the old Puritan. Shortly after his int
Gerrit Smith (search for this): chapter 2.28
ccupation of the writer, varied with the cleaning of rifles and revolvers, and fired twelve shots, drilled, cleaned guns and loaded, received letters from J. and G. Smith. September 23, the record acknowledges the receipt of letters from Redpath and G. Smith; on the 30th the writer finishes reading G. Smith's speech, and statesG. Smith; on the 30th the writer finishes reading G. Smith's speech, and states that efforts were made to raise a fund to send cannon and arms to Lane, but adds that they proved a failure. On the 1st of October the journalist visits Nebraska City with Mr. Jones and Carpenter. October 3d proves a lucky date to the writer, who records the receipt then of seventy-two dollars from friend Sanborn. The succeeG. Smith's speech, and states that efforts were made to raise a fund to send cannon and arms to Lane, but adds that they proved a failure. On the 1st of October the journalist visits Nebraska City with Mr. Jones and Carpenter. October 3d proves a lucky date to the writer, who records the receipt then of seventy-two dollars from friend Sanborn. The succeeding day (Sunday) our journalist improves his leisure by perusing speech of Judge Curtis, delivered before the students of Union College, New Jersey, and of Dartmouth College, and at the Normal School Convention, Westfield, Mass., and at Brown University, R. I. ; the entry of the same date continues, Read of the awful disaster to
Richard Robertson (search for this): chapter 2.28
remain for a few days. I had to wait for Realf for three or four days; Hinten, could not leave at that time. I started with Realf and Parsons on a stage for Leavenworth. The boats had stopped running on account of the ice. Staid one day in Leavenworth, and then left for Westen, where we took stage for St. Joseph, and from thence to Tabor. I found C. P. Tidd and Leeman at Tabor. Our party now consisted of Captain John Brown, Owen Brown, A. D. Stephens, Charles Moffitt, C. P. Tidd, Richard Robertson, Col. Richard Realf, L. F. Parsons, William Leeman, and myself. We stopped some days at Tabor, making preparations to start. Here ce found that Captain Brown's ultimate destination was the State of Virginia. Some warm words passed between him and myself in regard to the plan, which I had supposed was to be confined entirely to Kansas and Missouri. Realf and Parsons were of the same opinion with me. After a good deal of wrangling we consented to go on, as we had not the means to retu
sacrifice of personal feeling I appear in this manner before the public. John Brown. In February, when in Collinsville, Connecticut, he ordered the manufacture of his pikes. I remember that, when in Boston, he spoke with great contempt of Sharpe's rifles as a weapon for inexperienced men, and said that with a pike, or bow and arrows, he could arm recruits more formidably than with patent guns. How he ordered the pikes is thus stated by the maker of them: In the latter part of Februainion with me. After a good deal of wrangling we consented to go on, as we had not the means to return, and the rest of the party were so anxious that we should go with them. At Tabor we procured teams for the transportation of about two hundred Sharpe's rifles, which had been taken on as far as Tabor, one year before, at which place they had been left, awaiting the order of Captain Brown. There were, also, other stores, consisting of blankets, clothing, boots, ammunition, and about two hundre
Eliza Horton (search for this): chapter 2.28
irst entry, of Aug. 25, states that the writer started at a certain date in June for Tabor, from Akron to Hudson; got goods at Henrichs, &c. ; harness ; bought red mail stage at Jerries ; next day went to Cleveland; shipped chest by express; staid at Bennett's Temperance House; next day went to church through the day and evening. July 4, the entry is, Father left for Iowa City, where he was joined by Jason, on h the 5th, who records a meeting with Dr. Bowen, Mrs. Bowen, and Jessie and Eliza Horton. The entries until the 10th record the purchases of wood for spears, staples, chains for mules, and canvas for wagon cover. A horse and buggy was swapped for two horses on the 13th; on the 14th tents and tent poles were carefully packed in the wagons, and additional blankets purchased. July 15, the entry is, The party crossed Iowa River, (Fort des Moines River at Red Rock, from which the autobiography is dated,) stopped at noon on the stream beyond Six Mile House. The entry of A
James Smith (search for this): chapter 2.28
ever be wanted or put to use in any way, if made; but, to my surprise, he drew up a contract for one thousand, to be completed within three months, he agreeing to pay me five hundred dollars in thirty days, and the balance within thirty days thereafter. Having failed to raise the necessary money, the pikes were left unfinished at this time; but, in the following year, in the month of June, John Brown was again in Collinsville, and completed the contract, and in August, under the name of J. Smith and Sons, ordered them to be forwarded to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, upon which they were transported across the country to Harper's Ferry. In March and April, Captain Brown made an agreement with a drill-master, named Hugh Forbes, all Englishman, and a Revolutionary exile, to instruct a number of young Kansas men in military science. Forbes engaged to be at Tabor, in Iowa, in June, to meet John Brown and his men there. In May, John Brown set out for Kansas, but was delayed in the
Hugh Forbes (search for this): chapter 2.28
rown made an agreement with a drill-master, named Hugh Forbes, all Englishman, and a Revolutionary exile, to in a number of young Kansas men in military science. Forbes engaged to be at Tabor, in Iowa, in June, to meet Jse. The entry of Aug. 9 records the arrival of Col. Forbes, (at Tabor,) who from the frequent mention made o among the effects of Old Brown, we suppose to be Hugh Forbes, author of a Manual of the Patriotic Volunteer, tn Brown reached Tabor on the 7th of August, and Colonel Forbes, two days after him. They were obliged to remaids. During this interval of suspense, writes Col. Forbes, Captain Brown advocated the adoption of his planstrike down Slavery. On the 2d of November, Colonel Forbes took steamer at Nebraska City for the East, andborhood of Springdale, and that our instructor, Col. H. Forbes, should be sent on. We stopped in Pedee, Iowa, where we pursued a course of military studies. Col. H. Forbes and Captain Brown had some words, and he (Col.
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