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Akron (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
e papers at the Kennedy Farm, gives an outline of his movements after starting for the Territory. Journal of one of Brown's sons. The journal, which opens on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 1857, is contained in an ordinary-sized account book, upon the fly-leaf of which is impressed a circular stamp, inscribed Tabor, Fremont County, Iowa, and around the rim the name of Jason Jones, Notary public. The first entry, of Aug. 25, states that the writer started at a certain date in June for Tabor, from Akron to Hudson; got goods at Henrichs, &c. ; harness ; bought red mail stage at Jerries ; next day went to Cleveland; shipped chest by express; staid at Bennett's Temperance House; next day went to church through the day and evening. July 4, the entry is, Father left for Iowa City, where he was joined by Jason, on h the 5th, who records a meeting with Dr. Bowen, Mrs. Bowen, and Jessie and Eliza Horton. The entries until the 10th record the purchases of wood for spears, staples, chains for
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
s in Springdale, and, with the proceeds, to go on with the rest of the company to some place in Ashtabula County, Ohio, where we were to have a good military instructor during the winter; but he was disappointed in the sale. As he could not get cash for the teams, it was decided we should remain in the neighborhood of Springdale, and that our instructor, Col. H. Forbes, should be sent on. We stopped in Pedee, Iowa, over winter, at Mr. Maxson's, where we pursued a course of military studies. Col. H. Forbes and Captain Brown had some words, and he (Col. F.) did not come on; consequently, A. D. Stephens was our drill-master. The people of the neighborhood did not know of our purpose. We remained at Pedee till about the middle of April, when we left for Chatham, Canada, via Chicago and Detroit. In this extract there are two false statements; that some warm words passed between Cook and Brown; and that there was a good deal of wrangling between the Captain, and Parsons, and Realf.
Nebraska City (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
tates that efforts were made to raise a fund to send cannon and arms to Lane, but adds that they proved a failure. On the 1st of October the journalist visits Nebraska City with Mr. Jones and Carpenter. October 3d proves a lucky date to the writer, who records the receipt then of seventy-two dollars from friend Sanborn. The surs with the Bible Story of Gideon, believing that he with a handful of men could strike down Slavery. On the 2d of November, Colonel Forbes took steamer at Nebraska City for the East, and Captain Brown went down to Kansas by the emigrants' road, in a wagon driven by one of his sons. He left two others at Tabor. Here Cook's aptain Brown. Staid a day and a half at Mrs. Sheridan's — then lift for Topeka, at which place we were joined by Stephens, Moffitt, and Kagi. Left Topeka for Nebraska City, and camped at night on the prairie north-east of Topeka. Here, for the first, I learned that we were to leave Kansas to attend a military school during the w
Collinsville (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
ke up the business? It is with no little sacrifice of personal feeling I appear in this manner before the public. John Brown. In February, when in Collinsville, Connecticut, he ordered the manufacture of his pikes. I remember that, when in Boston, he spoke with great contempt of Sharpe's rifles as a weapon for inexperiencedpikes is thus stated by the maker of them: In the latter part of February, or the early part of March, 1857, Old Brown, as he is familiarly called, came to Collinsville to visit his relatives, and by invitation addressed the inhabitants at a public meeting. At the close of it, or on the following day, he exhibited some weaponing failed to raise the necessary money, the pikes were left unfinished at this time; but, in the following year, in the month of June, John Brown was again in Collinsville, and completed the contract, and in August, under the name of J. Smith and Sons, ordered them to be forwarded to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, upon which they we
Iowa River (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
entry is, Father left for Iowa City, where he was joined by Jason, on h the 5th, who records a meeting with Dr. Bowen, Mrs. Bowen, and Jessie and Eliza Horton. The entries until the 10th record the purchases of wood for spears, staples, chains for mules, and canvas for wagon cover. A horse and buggy was swapped for two horses on the 13th; on the 14th tents and tent poles were carefully packed in the wagons, and additional blankets purchased. July 15, the entry is, The party crossed Iowa River, (Fort des Moines River at Red Rock, from which the autobiography is dated,) stopped at noon on the stream beyond Six Mile House. The entry of Aug. 9 records the arrival of Col. Forbes, (at Tabor,) who from the frequent mention made of that work, the deference which the entries betray for the military judgment of the Colonel, and from the fact of the discovery of several copies of his work among the effects of Old Brown, we suppose to be Hugh Forbes, author of a Manual of the Patriotic
Washington county (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
before, at which place they had been left, awaiting the order of Captain Brown. There were, also, other stores, consisting of blankets, clothing, boots, ammunition, and about two hundred revolvers of the Massachusetts Arms patent, all of which we transported across the State of Iowa to Springdale, and from there to Liberty, at which place they were shipped for Ashtabula County, Ohio, where they remained till brought to Chambersburg, Pa., and were from there transported to a house in Washington County, Md., which Captain Brown had rented for six months, and which was situated about five miles from Harper's Ferry. It was the intention of Captain Brown to sell his teams in Springdale, and, with the proceeds, to go on with the rest of the company to some place in Ashtabula County, Ohio, where we were to have a good military instructor during the winter; but he was disappointed in the sale. As he could not get cash for the teams, it was decided we should remain in the neighborhood of Spr
Ashtabula (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
. Here, for the first, I learned that we were to leave Kansas to attend a military school during the winter. It was the intention of the party to go to Ashtabula County, Ohio Next morning I was sent back to Lawrence to get a draft of eighty dollars cashed, and to get Parsons, Realf, and Hinton to go back with me. I got the drafachusetts Arms patent, all of which we transported across the State of Iowa to Springdale, and from there to Liberty, at which place they were shipped for Ashtabula County, Ohio, where they remained till brought to Chambersburg, Pa., and were from there transported to a house in Washington County, Md., which Captain Brown had rentry. It was the intention of Captain Brown to sell his teams in Springdale, and, with the proceeds, to go on with the rest of the company to some place in Ashtabula County, Ohio, where we were to have a good military instructor during the winter; but he was disappointed in the sale. As he could not get cash for the teams, it was
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
the Kansas difficulties cease, the youths thus drilled would follow him to Harper's Ferry, which, for many years, he had selected as the grand point of attack on slasburg, Pennsylvania, upon which they were transported across the country to Harper's Ferry. In March and April, Captain Brown made an agreement with a drill-masteed mine of stampedes. The conclusion arrived at was, that he renounced his Harper's Ferry project, and I consented to cooperate in stampedes in Virginia and Maryland suitable. I perceived, however, that his mind constantly wandered back to Harper's Ferry, and it was not till it had been definitely settled that neither of us shou a committee, that I felt easy in my mind respecting his curious notions of Harper's Ferry. He was very pious, and had been deeply impressed for many years with the own had rented for six months, and which was situated about five miles from Harper's Ferry. It was the intention of Captain Brown to sell his teams in Springdale, an
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
John Brown's scheme. John Brown returned to Kansas in the month of November, 1857. What had hes to drill a select number of the young men of Kansas, who had proved themselves faithful to principhe exhibited the chain worn by his son John in Kansas, and, with a gesture and voice never to be for A meeting of prominent friends of freedom in Kansas, was to be held on the Sabbath, as no other daeapon to place in the hands of the settlers in Kansas, to keep in their cabins to defend themselves lutionary exile, to instruct a number of young Kansas men in military science. Forbes engaged to bes men there. In May, John Brown set out for Kansas, but was delayed in the Central States for sominuet men, who are mixed up with the people of Kansas, and he leaves the States, with a feeling of dy for the East, and Captain Brown went down to Kansas by the emigrants' road, in a wagon driven by ofor the first, I learned that we were to leave Kansas to attend a military school during the winter.[9 more...]
Topeka (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.28
tain Cook. Dear Sir: You will please get every thing ready to join me at Topeka by Monday night next. Come to Mrs. Sheridan's, two miles south of Topeka, andTopeka, and bring your arms, ammunition, clothing, and other articles you may require. Bring Parsons with you if he can get ready in time. Please keep very quiet about the maton could not get ready. I left them at Lawrence, and started in a carriage for Topeka. Stopped at the hotel over night, and left early the next morning for Mrs. She meet Captain Brown. Staid a day and a half at Mrs. Sheridan's — then lift for Topeka, at which place we were joined by Stephens, Moffitt, and Kagi. Left Topeka forTopeka for Nebraska City, and camped at night on the prairie north-east of Topeka. Here, for the first, I learned that we were to leave Kansas to attend a military school duriTopeka. Here, for the first, I learned that we were to leave Kansas to attend a military school during the winter. It was the intention of the party to go to Ashtabula County, Ohio Next morning I was sent back to Lawrence to get a draft of eighty dollars cashed, a
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