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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.39
s. You all know how dear life is to you, and how dear your lives are to your friends; and, in remembering that, consider that the lives of others are as dear to them as yours are to you. Do not, therefore, take the life of any one if you can possibly avoid it; but if it is necessary to take life in order to save your own, then make sure work of it. Harper's Ferry. Fearful and Exciting Intelligence! Negro Insurrection at Harper's Ferry! Extensive Negro Conspiracy in Virginia and Maryland! Seizure of the United States Arsenal by the Insurrectionists! Arms taken and sent into the Interior! The Bridge fortified and defended by Cannon! Trains fired into and Stopped! Several Persons killed! Telegraph Wires cut! Contributions levied on the Citizens! Troops despatched against the insurgents from Washington and Baltimore! Such were the headings of the first telegraphic reports of John Brown's brave blow at American Slavery. Before briefly describing the events that t
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.39
tory reasons, he determined to strike the blow that was to strike the Slave System to its foundations, on the night of the 17th. One of the men who fought at Harper's Ferry gave me as the chief reason for tie precipitate movement, that there was a Judas whom they suspected in their midst. That the reasons were just and important, the prudence that John Brown had always hitherto manifested satisfactorily proves. But this decision, however necessary, was unfortunate; for the men from Canada, Kansas, New England, and the neighboring Free States, who had been told to be prepared for the event on the 24th of October, and were ready to do their duty at Harper's Ferry at that time, were unable to join their Captain at this earlier period. Many, who started to join the Liberators, halted half way; for the blow had already been struck, and their Captain made a captive. Had there been no precipitation, the mountains of Virginia, to-day, would have been peopled with free blacks, properly of
Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.39
opped! Several Persons killed! Telegraph Wires cut! Contributions levied on the Citizens! Troops despatched against the insurgents from Washington and Baltimore! Such were the headings of the first telegraphic reports of John Brown's brave blow at American Slavery. Before briefly describing the events that they foreshadow, it is necessary to speak of the place where they occurred. The standard Virginia authority of the day thus writes: Harper's Ferry is situated in Jefferson County, Virginia, at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, on a point just opposite the gap through which the united streams pass the Blue Ridge on their way toward the ocean. The Ridge here is about twelve hundred feet in height, showing bare, precipitous cliffs on either side on the river, and exhibiting some of the most beautiful and imposing natural scenery to be found in the country. The town was originally built on two streets stretching along a narrow shelf between the base
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 2.39
s, he determined to strike the blow that was to strike the Slave System to its foundations, on the night of the 17th. One of the men who fought at Harper's Ferry gave me as the chief reason for tie precipitate movement, that there was a Judas whom they suspected in their midst. That the reasons were just and important, the prudence that John Brown had always hitherto manifested satisfactorily proves. But this decision, however necessary, was unfortunate; for the men from Canada, Kansas, New England, and the neighboring Free States, who had been told to be prepared for the event on the 24th of October, and were ready to do their duty at Harper's Ferry at that time, were unable to join their Captain at this earlier period. Many, who started to join the Liberators, halted half way; for the blow had already been struck, and their Captain made a captive. Had there been no precipitation, the mountains of Virginia, to-day, would have been peopled with free blacks, properly officered an
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.39
nal intention of Captain Brown to seize the Arsenal at Harper's Ferry on the night of the 24th of October, and to take the aon the night of the 17th. One of the men who fought at Harper's Ferry gave me as the chief reason for tie precipitate movemehe 24th of October, and were ready to do their duty at Harper's Ferry at that time, were unable to join their Captain at thiary, on that account also, to precipitate an attack on Harper's Ferry. On Saturday, a meeting of the Liberators was held,rder to save your own, then make sure work of it. Harper's Ferry. Fearful and Exciting Intelligence! Negro Insurrection at Harper's Ferry! Extensive Negro Conspiracy in Virginia and Maryland! Seizure of the United States Arsenal by theandard Virginia authority of the day thus writes: Harper's Ferry is situated in Jefferson County, Virginia, at the confituated on a small island in the Shenandoah River. Harper's Ferry, by the admission of military men, was admirably chose
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.39
with a number of the wealthier citizens of the vicinity, as hostages, until they should redeem themselves by liberating an equal number of their slaves. When at Baltimore, for satisfactory reasons, he determined to strike the blow that was to strike the Slave System to its foundations, on the night of the 17th. One of the men who o and Stopped! Several Persons killed! Telegraph Wires cut! Contributions levied on the Citizens! Troops despatched against the insurgents from Washington and Baltimore! Such were the headings of the first telegraphic reports of John Brown's brave blow at American Slavery. Before briefly describing the events that they fer a population of five thousand; is distant from Richmond one hundred and seventy-three miles; from Washington City fifty-seven miles by turnpike road; and from Baltimore eighty miles by rail. Here the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad crosses the Potomac by a magnificent covered bridge, nine hundred feet long, and passes along Potomac
Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): chapter 2.39
utions levied on the Citizens! Troops despatched against the insurgents from Washington and Baltimore! Such were the headings of the first telegraphic reports of John Brown's brave blow at American Slavery. Before briefly describing the events that they foreshadow, it is necessary to speak of the place where they occurred. The standard Virginia authority of the day thus writes: Harper's Ferry is situated in Jefferson County, Virginia, at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, on a point just opposite the gap through which the united streams pass the Blue Ridge on their way toward the ocean. The Ridge here is about twelve hundred feet in height, showing bare, precipitous cliffs on either side on the river, and exhibiting some of the most beautiful and imposing natural scenery to be found in the country. The town was originally built on two streets stretching along a narrow shelf between the base of the bluff and the rivers, meeting at the point at nearly
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 2.39
rrow shelf between the base of the bluff and the rivers, meeting at the point at nearly a right angle, and named respectively Potomac and Shenandoah Streets. To accommodate its increasing population, the town has straggled up the steep bluff, arid, in detached villages and scattered residences, occupies the level ground above — about four hundred feet above the streams. It has altogether a population of five thousand; is distant from Richmond one hundred and seventy-three miles; from Washington City fifty-seven miles by turnpike road; and from Baltimore eighty miles by rail. Here the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad crosses the Potomac by a magnificent covered bridge, nine hundred feet long, and passes along Potomac Street westward, its track lying forty feet above the river. The Winchester and Harper's Ferry Railroad, lying along Shenandoah Street, connects with the Baltimore and Ohio at the bridge. Potomac Street is entirely occupied by the workshops and offices of the National Arm
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 2.39
satisfactory reasons, he determined to strike the blow that was to strike the Slave System to its foundations, on the night of the 17th. One of the men who fought at Harper's Ferry gave me as the chief reason for tie precipitate movement, that there was a Judas whom they suspected in their midst. That the reasons were just and important, the prudence that John Brown had always hitherto manifested satisfactorily proves. But this decision, however necessary, was unfortunate; for the men from Canada, Kansas, New England, and the neighboring Free States, who had been told to be prepared for the event on the 24th of October, and were ready to do their duty at Harper's Ferry at that time, were unable to join their Captain at this earlier period. Many, who started to join the Liberators, halted half way; for the blow had already been struck, and their Captain made a captive. Had there been no precipitation, the mountains of Virginia, to-day, would have been peopled with free blacks, pro
O. Jennings Wise (search for this): chapter 2.39
ook, I was placed under Captain Stevens, who received orders to proceed to the house of Colonel Lewis Washington, and to take him prisoner, and to bring his slaves, horses, and arms; and, as we came back, to take Mr. Alstadtt and his slaves, and to bring them all to Captain Brown at the Armory. This party of six arrived at the house of Colonel Washington shortly after midnight, took him prisoner, seized his arms, horses, and carriage, and liberated his ,slaves. It is remarkable, said Governor Wise, speaking of this event, that the only thing of material value which they took, besides his slaves, was the sword of Frederick the Great, which was sent to General Washington. This was taken by Stevens to Brown, and the latter commanded his men with that sword in this fight against the peace and safety of Washington's native State! In returning to the Armory, Mr. Alstadtt and his son were taken prisoners, and the slaves on their estate were freed. On entering the Armory, said Was
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