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Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
peech-a rifle of far straighter sight and longer range. It is seldom that men of views so opposite meet together, either in the events themselves, or in their subsequent views of those events, as met at Harper's Ferry, when Captain John Brown and Senator Mason -the abolitionist and the extraditionist — the slave liberator in virtue of the higher law, and the slave-holding author of the fugitive slave law — gazed at each other face to face; or when the Baltimore American and the hermit of Concord united to do honor to the venerable invader of Virginia! The reader will notice, also, how the two earnest men respected each other; how Mason, the fanatic, unlike his compromising compeer, was courteous to the old man, fearless and almost reverential in his questionings. The conversation. Senator Mason. Can you tell us, at least, who furnished money for your expedition? Capt. Brown. I furnished most of it myself. I cannot implicate others. It is by my own folly that I have been
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
s. Who, then, were his constituents? Read his words, understandingly, and you will find out. In his case there is no idle eloquence. Truth is the inspirer and earnestness the polisher of his sentences. He could afford the loss of his Sharpe's rifles while he retained the faculty of speech-a rifle of far straighter sight and longer range. It is seldom that men of views so opposite meet together, either in the events themselves, or in their subsequent views of those events, as met at Harper's Ferry, when Captain John Brown and Senator Mason -the abolitionist and the extraditionist — the slave liberator in virtue of the higher law, and the slave-holding author of the fugitive slave law — gazed at each other face to face; or when the Baltimore American and the hermit of Concord united to do honor to the venerable invader of Virginia! The reader will notice, also, how the two earnest men respected each other; how Mason, the fanatic, unlike his compromising compeer, was courteous to t
Trumbull (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
and wounded, in my hands. Bystander. Did you not promise a negro in Gettysburg twenty dollars a month? Capt. B. I did not. Bystander. He says you did. Mr. V. Were you ever in Dayton, Ohio? Capt. B. Yes, I must have been. Mr. V. This summer? Capt. B. No; a year or two since. Senator 1. Does this talking annoy you at all? Capt. B. Not in the least. Mr. V. Have you lived long in Ohio? Capt. B. I went there in 1805. I lived in Summit County, which was then Trumbull County. My native place is York State. Mr. V. Do you recollect a man in Ohio named Brown, a noted counterfeiter? Capt. B. I do. I knew him from a boy. His father was Henry Brown, of Irish or Scotch descent. The family was very low. Mr. V. Have you ever been in Portage County? Capt. B. I was there in June last. Mr. V. When in Cleveland, did you attend the Fugitive Slave Law Convention there? Capt. B. No. I was there about the time of the sitting of the court to try the Ober
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
hen in Cleveland, did you attend the Fugitive Slave Law Convention there? Capt. B. No. I was there about the time of the sitting of the court to try the Oberlin rescuers. I spoke there, publicly, on that subject. I spoke on the fugitive slave law, and my own rescue. Of course, so far as I had any influence at all, I was disposed to justify the Oberlin people for rescuing the slave, because I have myself forcibly taken slaves from bondage. I was concerned in taking eleven slaves from Missouri to Canada, last winter. I think that I spoke in Cleveland before the Convention. I do not know that I had any conversation with any of the Oberlin rescuers. I was sick part of the time I was in Ohio. I had the ague. I was part of the 41me in Ashtabula county. Mr. V. Did you see any thing of Joshua R. Giddings there? Capt. B. I did meet him. Mr. V. Did you converse with him? Capt. B. I did. I would not tell you, of course, any thing that would implicate Mr. Giddings; but I
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 2.43
own rescue. Of course, so far as I had any influence at all, I was disposed to justify the Oberlin people for rescuing the slave, because I have myself forcibly taken slaves from bondage. I was concerned in taking eleven slaves from Missouri to Canada, last winter. I think that I spoke in Cleveland before the Convention. I do not know that I had any conversation with any of the Oberlin rescuers. I was sick part of the time I was in Ohio. I had the ague. I was part of the 41me in Ashtabullies, and the community at large. Mr. V. Did you not shoot a negro on the bridge, or did not some of your party? Capt. B. I knew nothing of the shooting of the negro, (Heywood.) Mr. V. What time did you commence your organization over in Canada? Capt. B. It occurred about two years ago. If I remember right, it was, I think, in 1858. Mr. V. Who was the secretary? Capt. B. That I would not tell if I recollected; but I do not remember. I think the officers were elected in May, 18
Summit County (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
you, if you had been a prisoner and wounded, in my hands. Bystander. Did you not promise a negro in Gettysburg twenty dollars a month? Capt. B. I did not. Bystander. He says you did. Mr. V. Were you ever in Dayton, Ohio? Capt. B. Yes, I must have been. Mr. V. This summer? Capt. B. No; a year or two since. Senator 1. Does this talking annoy you at all? Capt. B. Not in the least. Mr. V. Have you lived long in Ohio? Capt. B. I went there in 1805. I lived in Summit County, which was then Trumbull County. My native place is York State. Mr. V. Do you recollect a man in Ohio named Brown, a noted counterfeiter? Capt. B. I do. I knew him from a boy. His father was Henry Brown, of Irish or Scotch descent. The family was very low. Mr. V. Have you ever been in Portage County? Capt. B. I was there in June last. Mr. V. When in Cleveland, did you attend the Fugitive Slave Law Convention there? Capt. B. No. I was there about the time of the sitti
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
Mr. V. Who was the secretary? Capt. B. That I would not tell if I recollected; but I do not remember. I think the officers were elected in May, 1858. I may answer incorrectly, but not intentionally. My head is a little confused by wounds, and my memory of dates and such like is somewhat confused. Dr. Biggs. Were you in the party at Dr. Kennedy's house? Capt. B. I was the head of that party. I occupied the house to mature my plans. I would state here that I have not been in Baltimore to purchase percussion caps. Dr. B. What was the number of men at Kennedy's? Capt. B. I decline to answer that. Dr. B. Who lanced that woman's neck on the hill? Capt. B. I did. I have sometimes practised in surgery, when I thought it a matter of humanity or of necessity — when there was no one else to do it; but I have not studied surgery. Dr. B. (To the persons around.) It was done very well and scientifically. These men have been very clever to the neighbors, I have been told
Steubenville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
h you, at any time, and all times. I hold that the golden rule--Do unto others as you would that others should do unto you --applies to all who would help others to gain their liberty. Lieutenant Stuart. But you don't believe in the Bible? Capt. B. Certainly I do. Mr. V. Where did your men come from? Did some of them come from Ohio? Capt. B. Some of them. Mr. V. From the Western Reserve, of course! None came from Southern Ohio? Capt. B. O, yes. I believe one came from Steubenville, down not far from Wheeling. Mr. V. Have you been in Ohio this summer? Capt. B. Yes, sir. Mr. V. How lately? Capt. B. I passed through to Pittsburg on my way, in June. Mr. V. Were you at any county or state fair there? Capt. B. I was not there since June. Senator M. Did you consider this a military organization in this paper? (Showing a copy of John Brown's constitution and ordinance.) I have not yet read it. Capt. B. I did in some measure. I wish you would give
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
mes. I hold that the golden rule--Do unto others as you would that others should do unto you --applies to all who would help others to gain their liberty. Lieutenant Stuart. But you don't believe in the Bible? Capt. B. Certainly I do. Mr. V. Where did your men come from? Did some of them come from Ohio? Capt. B. Some of them. Mr. V. From the Western Reserve, of course! None came from Southern Ohio? Capt. B. O, yes. I believe one came from Steubenville, down not far from Wheeling. Mr. V. Have you been in Ohio this summer? Capt. B. Yes, sir. Mr. V. How lately? Capt. B. I passed through to Pittsburg on my way, in June. Mr. V. Were you at any county or state fair there? Capt. B. I was not there since June. Senator M. Did you consider this a military organization in this paper? (Showing a copy of John Brown's constitution and ordinance.) I have not yet read it. Capt. B. I did in some measure. I wish you would give that paper your close attenti
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.43
orth, is a mere trope with those who persist in using it; and I have no doubt that many of them, in silence, have already retracted their words. Read his admirable answers to Mason and others. Now they are dwarfed and defeated by the contrast! On the one side, half-brutish, half-timid questioning; on the other, Truth, clear as lightning, crashing into their obscene temples. They are made to stand as Pilate or Gesler and the Inquisition. Probably all the speeches of all the men whom Massachusetts has sent to Congress for the last few years do not match, for manly directness and force, and for simple truth, the few casual remarks of John Brown on the floor of the Harper's Ferry engine house -that man whom you are about to send to the other world; though not to represent you there. He is too fair a specimen of a man to represent the like of us. Who, then, were his constituents? Read his words, understandingly, and you will find out. In his case there is no idle eloquence. Truth
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