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far from Wheeling. Mr. V. Have you been in Ohio this summer? Capt. B. Yes, sir. Mr. V. How lately? Capt. B. I passed through to Pittsburg on my way, in June. Mr. V. Were you at any county or state fair there? Capt. B. I was not there since June. Senator M. Did you consider this a military organization in this a boy. His father was Henry Brown, of Irish or Scotch descent. The family was very low. Mr. V. Have you ever been in Portage County? Capt. B. I was there in June last. Mr. V. When in Cleveland, did you attend the Fugitive Slave Law Convention there? Capt. B. No. I was there about the time of the sitting of the court e Free States. Mr. V. But are you not personally acquainted in Southern Ohio? Capt. B. Not very much. Mr. V. (To Stevens.) Were you at the convention last June? Stevens. I was. Mr. V. (To Capt. Brown.) You made a speech there? Capt. B. I did, sir. Bystander. Did you ever live in ~Washington city? Capt. B. I
made such a remark to you, if you had been a prisoner and wounded, in my hands. Bystander. Did you not promise a negro in Gettysburg twenty dollars a month? Capt. B. I did not. Bystander. He says you did. Mr. V. Were you ever in Dayton, Ohio? Capt. B. Yes, I must have been. Mr. V. This summer? Capt. B. No; a year or two since. Senator 1. Does this talking annoy you at all? Capt. B. Not in the least. Mr. V. Have you lived long in Ohio? Capt. B. I went there in 1805. I lived in Summit County, which was then Trumbull County. My native place is York State. Mr. V. Do you recollect a man in Ohio named Brown, a noted counterfeiter? Capt. B. I do. I knew him from a boy. His father was Henry Brown, of Irish or Scotch descent. The family was very low. Mr. V. Have you ever been in Portage County? Capt. B. I was there in June last. Mr. V. When in Cleveland, did you attend the Fugitive Slave Law Convention there? Capt. B. No. I was there about
y night, and up to the time I was attacked by the government troops. It was all occasioned by my desire to spare the feelings of my prisoners and their families, and the community at large. Mr. V. Did you not shoot a negro on the bridge, or did not some of your party? Capt. B. I knew nothing of the shooting of the negro, (Heywood.) Mr. V. What time did you commence your organization over in Canada? Capt. B. It occurred about two years ago. If I remember right, it was, I think, in 1858. Mr. V. Who was the secretary? Capt. B. That I would not tell if I recollected; but I do not remember. I think the officers were elected in May, 1858. I may answer incorrectly, but not intentionally. My head is a little confused by wounds, and my memory of dates and such like is somewhat confused. Dr. Biggs. Were you in the party at Dr. Kennedy's house? Capt. B. I was the head of that party. I occupied the house to mature my plans. I would state here that I have not been in B
May, 1858 AD (search for this): chapter 2.43
milies, and the community at large. Mr. V. Did you not shoot a negro on the bridge, or did not some of your party? Capt. B. I knew nothing of the shooting of the negro, (Heywood.) Mr. V. What time did you commence your organization over in Canada? Capt. B. It occurred about two years ago. If I remember right, it was, I think, in 1858. Mr. V. Who was the secretary? Capt. B. That I would not tell if I recollected; but I do not remember. I think the officers were elected in May, 1858. I may answer incorrectly, but not intentionally. My head is a little confused by wounds, and my memory of dates and such like is somewhat confused. Dr. Biggs. Were you in the party at Dr. Kennedy's house? Capt. B. I was the head of that party. I occupied the house to mature my plans. I would state here that I have not been in Baltimore to purchase percussion caps. Dr. B. What was the number of men at Kennedy's? Capt. B. I decline to answer that. Dr. B. Who lanced that woman
the negro, (Heywood.) Mr. V. What time did you commence your organization over in Canada? Capt. B. It occurred about two years ago. If I remember right, it was, I think, in 1858. Mr. V. Who was the secretary? Capt. B. That I would not tell if I recollected; but I do not remember. I think the officers were elected in May, 1858. I may answer incorrectly, but not intentionally. My head is a little confused by wounds, and my memory of dates and such like is somewhat confused. Dr. Biggs. Were you in the party at Dr. Kennedy's house? Capt. B. I was the head of that party. I occupied the house to mature my plans. I would state here that I have not been in Baltimore to purchase percussion caps. Dr. B. What was the number of men at Kennedy's? Capt. B. I decline to answer that. Dr. B. Who lanced that woman's neck on the hill? Capt. B. I did. I have sometimes practised in surgery, when I thought it a matter of humanity or of necessity — when there was no one else t
Henry Brown (search for this): chapter 2.43
ever in Dayton, Ohio? Capt. B. Yes, I must have been. Mr. V. This summer? Capt. B. No; a year or two since. Senator 1. Does this talking annoy you at all? Capt. B. Not in the least. Mr. V. Have you lived long in Ohio? Capt. B. I went there in 1805. I lived in Summit County, which was then Trumbull County. My native place is York State. Mr. V. Do you recollect a man in Ohio named Brown, a noted counterfeiter? Capt. B. I do. I knew him from a boy. His father was Henry Brown, of Irish or Scotch descent. The family was very low. Mr. V. Have you ever been in Portage County? Capt. B. I was there in June last. Mr. V. When in Cleveland, did you attend the Fugitive Slave Law Convention there? Capt. B. No. I was there about the time of the sitting of the court to try the Oberlin rescuers. I spoke there, publicly, on that subject. I spoke on the fugitive slave law, and my own rescue. Of course, so far as I had any influence at all, I was disposed to
inquisitors. As soon as it was known that John Brown was not dead, and that three of his followerio. The result of these visits was one of John Brown's greatest victories. From the three publisublication, some, who subsequently eulogized John Brown, with fervor and surpassing eloquence, as wwith the gallows staring him full in the face, Brown lay on the floor, and, in reply to every questwho furnished money for your expedition? Capt. Brown. I furnished most of it myself. I cannot ilast June? Stevens. I was. Mr. V. (To Capt. Brown.) You made a speech there? Capt. B. I dioot any body; but when they were fired upon by Brown's men, and one of them had been killed, and an were obliged to return the compliment. Captain Brown insisted, with some warmth, that the marinrm any one not in arms against us. Q. Well, Brown, suppose you had every nigger in the United Strate either the man or the conspiracy. Cap. John Brown is as brave and resolute a man as ever heade[11 more...]
Joshua R. Giddings (search for this): chapter 2.43
rlin rescuers. I was sick part of the time I was in Ohio. I had the ague. I was part of the 41me in Ashtabula county. Mr. V. Did you see any thing of Joshua R. Giddings there? Capt. B. I did meet him. Mr. V. Did you converse with him? Capt. B. I did. I would not tell you, of course, any thing that would implicate MMr. Giddings; but I certainly — net with him, and had a conversation with him. Mr. V. About that rescue case? Capt. B. Yes, I did. I heard him express his opinion upon it very freely and frankly. Mr. V. Justifying it? Capt. B. Yes, sir. I do not compromise him, certainly, in saying that. A Bystander. Did you go out t of the Emigrant Aid Society? Capt. B. No, sir; I went out under the auspices of John Brown, and nobody else. Mr. V. Will you answer this? Did you talk to Giddings about your expedition here? Capt. B. No, sir! I won't answer that, because a denial of it I would not make; and to make an affidavit of it, I should be a gre
strength when you suppose I could have been taken if I had not allowed it. I was too tardy, after commencing the open attack, in delaying my movements through Monday night, and up to the time I was attacked by the government troops. It was all occasioned by my desire to spare the feelings of my prisoners and their families, and the community at large. Mr. V. Did you not shoot a negro on the bridge, or did not some of your party? Capt. B. I knew nothing of the shooting of the negro, (Heywood.) Mr. V. What time did you commence your organization over in Canada? Capt. B. It occurred about two years ago. If I remember right, it was, I think, in 1858. Mr. V. Who was the secretary? Capt. B. That I would not tell if I recollected; but I do not remember. I think the officers were elected in May, 1858. I may answer incorrectly, but not intentionally. My head is a little confused by wounds, and my memory of dates and such like is somewhat confused. Dr. Biggs. Were you
ns. (To the inquirer, interrupting Brown.) You are right, sir; in one case--(a groan from the wounded man)--in one case, I know the negro wanted to go back.--(To Brown.) Captain, the gentleman is right. Bystander. (To Stevens.) Where did you come from? Stevens. I lived in Ashtabula County, Ohio. Mr. B. How recently did you leave Ashtabula County? Stevens. Some months ago. I never resided there any length of time. I have often been through there. Mr. V. How far did you live from Jefferson? Capt. B. (To Stevens.) Be very cautious, Stevens, about an answer to that; it might commit some friend. I would not answer it at all. Stevens, who had been groaning considerably, as if the exertion necessary to conversation seriously affected him, seemed content to abide by the captain's advice. He turned partially over, with a groan of pain, and was silent. Mr. V. (To Capt. Brown.) Who are your advisers in this movement? Capt. B. I cannot answer that. I have numerous sympa
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