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Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.47
nversation between Captain Brown and Governor Wise, when the Liberator was confined in the guard house at Harper's Ferry, in which he said that the prisoner stated, in reply to a question, that he thought he had been betrayed to the Secretary of War, but had practised a ruse to prevent suspicion; yet refused to inform them whom he believed to be the traitor, or how he had acted to avert the consequences of the betrayal. John Brown thus alluded to Colonel Forbes and his own third visit to Kansas. During the examination of this witness, a despatch arrived from Cleveland, announcing that Northern counsel would arrive in Charlestown that evening; whereupon the Virginia counsel for John Brown, in his name, asked that the cross-examination might be postponed till the following morning. It was already late in the evening, but the prosecuting attorney resisted the request, because: If the cases were not pushed on, the whole balance of the term --would not be sufficient to try the
Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.47
and quadruply guilty of treason. Mr. Hunter proceeded again to the question of jurisdiction over the Armory grounds, and examined the authority, cited on the other side, of Attorney General Cushing. The latter was an able man; but he came from a region of country where opinions are very different from ours in relation to the power of the Federal Government as affecting State rights. Our Courts are decidedly adverse to Mr. Cushing's views. In all time past, the jurisdiction of this County of Jefferson in criminal offences committed at Harper's Ferry, has been uninterrupted and unchallenged, whether they were committed on the Government property or not. He cited an instance, twenty-nine years ago, where an atrocious murder was committed between the very shops in front of which these men fought their battles, and the criminal was tried here, convicted, and executed under our laws. There was a broad difference between the cession of jurisdiction by Virginia to the Federal Government
Cleveland (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.47
nfined in the guard house at Harper's Ferry, in which he said that the prisoner stated, in reply to a question, that he thought he had been betrayed to the Secretary of War, but had practised a ruse to prevent suspicion; yet refused to inform them whom he believed to be the traitor, or how he had acted to avert the consequences of the betrayal. John Brown thus alluded to Colonel Forbes and his own third visit to Kansas. During the examination of this witness, a despatch arrived from Cleveland, announcing that Northern counsel would arrive in Charlestown that evening; whereupon the Virginia counsel for John Brown, in his name, asked that the cross-examination might be postponed till the following morning. It was already late in the evening, but the prosecuting attorney resisted the request, because: If the cases were not pushed on, the whole balance of the term --would not be sufficient to try these men. He thought there was no reason for delay, especially as it was uncer
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.47
witnesses for each and every act. 2. To establish the charge of a conspiracy with slaves, The jury must be satisfied that such conspiracy was done within the State of Virginia, and within the jurisdiction of this Court. If it was done in Maryland, this Court could not punish the act. If it was done within the limits of the Armory at Harper's Ferry, it was not done within the limits of this State, the Government of the United States holding exclusive jurisdiction within the said grounds. unishable by Federal Courts. 3. Over murder, (he argued,) if committed within the limits of the Armory, the Court had no jurisdiction ; and, in the case of Mr. Beckham, if he was killed on the railroad bridge, it was committed within the State of Maryland, which claims jurisdiction up to the Armory grounds. Mr. Botts followed him, and supported these views. The only noteworthy thing he said was, that-- It is due to the prisoner to state that he believed himself to be actuated by the
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.47
o convict of the offences charged: 1. To establish the charge of treason it must be proven that the prisoner attempted to establish a separate and distinct government with the limits of Virginia, and the purpose also of any treasonable acts; and this, not by any confessions of his own, elsewhere made, but by two different witnesses for each and every act. 2. To establish the charge of a conspiracy with slaves, The jury must be satisfied that such conspiracy was done within the State of Virginia, and within the jurisdiction of this Court. If it was done in Maryland, this Court could not punish the act. If it was done within the limits of the Armory at Harper's Ferry, it was not done within the limits of this State, the Government of the United States holding exclusive jurisdiction within the said grounds. Attorney General Cushing had. decided this point with regard to the Armory grounds at Harper's Furry, which opinion was read to the jury, showing that persons residing with
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3.47
e know that he was witnessing the beginning of the end of the rule of the wicked Power that he represents? Did he think that the wounded old man on the pallet was undermining, with his every groan and breath, the foundations of Human Slavery in America? As John Brown embodied the Northern religious anti-slavery idea, so Senator Mason, who now gazed at him, incarnated the Southern idolatrous principle of infidelity to man. Yet, seemingly, how reversed did their positions appear! The Slave Lib within the jurisdiction of this Court. If it was done in Maryland, this Court could not punish the act. If it was done within the limits of the Armory at Harper's Ferry, it was not done within the limits of this State, the Government of the United States holding exclusive jurisdiction within the said grounds. Attorney General Cushing had. decided this point with regard to the Armory grounds at Harper's Furry, which opinion was read to the jury, showing that persons residing within the limits
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.47
. If it was done in Maryland, this Court could not punish the act. If it was done within the limits of the Armory at Harper's Ferry, it was not done within the limits of this State, the Government of the United States holding exclusive jurisdiction r. Cushing's views. In all time past, the jurisdiction of this County of Jefferson in criminal offences committed at Harper's Ferry, has been uninterrupted and unchallenged, whether they were committed on the Government property or not. He cited an eral Government should become a landholder within its limits. The law of Virginia, by virtue of which the grounds at Harper's Ferry were purchased by the Federal Government, ceded no jurisdiction. Brown was also guilty, on his own notorious confessated the conversation between Captain Brown and Governor Wise, when the Liberator was confined in the guard house at Harper's Ferry, in which he said that the prisoner stated, in reply to a question, that he thought he had been betrayed to the Secre
ther side — for he was too feeble to walk alone,--and laid down on his cot within the bar. See the engraving. The author of the Fugitive Slave Law was present. Did he know that he was witnessing the beginning of the end of the rule of the wicked Power that he represents? Did he think that the wounded old man on the pallet was undermining, with his every groan and breath, the foundations of Human Slavery in America? As John Brown embodied the Northern religious anti-slavery idea, so Senator Mason, who now gazed at him, incarnated the Southern idolatrous principle of infidelity to man. Yet, seemingly, how reversed did their positions appear! The Slave Liberator with no earthly prospect but a speedy death on the gallows; and the Slave Extraditionist buoyed up with the hope of soon filling the Presidential Chair! A plea of insanity. The plea of insanity-first advanced by political monomaniacs in the Northern States, who could not understand a heroic action when they saw one,
p in a safe position; that he never spoke rudely or insultingly to them; that he allowed them to go out, to quiet their families, by assuring them of their personal safety; that he heard him direct his men, on several occasions, never to fire on an unarmed citizen; that he assured the captives that they should be treated well, and none of their property destroyed; and that he overheard a conversation between Stevens and another person, on Southern Institutions, in the course of which that Liberator asked, if he was in favor of slavery? and, on receiving the reply, that, although a non-slaveholder, yet, as a citizen of the South, he would sustain the cause, immediately answered, Then you are the first man I would hang; you deserve it more than a man who is a slaveholder and sustains his interests. He could not swear whether the marines fired after they broke into the engine house; the noise, he said, was great, and several shouted from the inside that some one had surrendered among
Gerritt Smith (search for this): chapter 3.47
meant. He replied, We don't want to injure you or detain your train. You could have gone at three o'clock: all we want is to free the negroes. I then asked if my train could now start, and went to the guard at the gate, who said, There is Captain Smith; he can tell you what you want to know. I went to the engine house, and the guard called Captain Smith. The prisoner at the bar came out, and I asked him if he was captain of these men. He replied he was. I asked him if I could cross the brCaptain Smith. The prisoner at the bar came out, and I asked him if he was captain of these men. He replied he was. I asked him if I could cross the bridge, and he peremptorily responded, No, sir. I then asked him what he meant by stopping my train. He replied, Are you the conductor on that train? I told him I was, and he said, Why, I sent you word at three o'clock that you could pass. I told him that, after being stopped by armed men on the bridge, I would not pass with my train. He replied, My head for it, you will not be hurt; and said he was very sorry. It was not his intention that any blood should be spilled; it was bad manag
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