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Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
olic priest. The Abolition leaders were, nevertheless, drawn largely from the clerical ranks; but they were Unitarians, Methodists, Congregationalists, Baptists, etc., and were generally driven from their own pulpits in consequence of their opinions about Slavery. The Ecclesiastical Apologists for Slavery founded their case upon the New Testament. A literature of exegesis was in existence of which the View of Slavery by John Henry Hopkins, D. D., Ll.D., Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of Vermont, is a late example. At this time Zachary Taylor, a slaveholder and a devout Episcopalian, was president of the United States. The situation was a difficult one for the Evangelical, anti-sectarian mind to deal with. What was the use of quoting the New Testament to slaveholders, who were already fortified out of that very volume? The effect of the situation on Garrison's temperament may be seen in the meeting at the Tabernacle. There is a demonic element in what he says: his utterance
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
o the Baptists, nor the Methodists; for they, too, are against the slave, and all the sects are combined to prevent that jubilee which it is the will of God should come. . . Be not startled when I say that a belief in Jesus is no evidence of goodness (hisses); no, friends. Voice — Yes it is. Mr. Garrison--Our friend says yes; my position is no. It is worthless as a test, for the reason I have already assigned in reference to the other tests. His praises are sung in Louisiana, Alabama, and the other Southern States just as well as in Massachusetts. Captain Rynders--Are you aware that the slaves in the South have their prayermeetings in honor of Christ? Mr. Garrison--Not a slaveholding or a slave-breeding Jesus. (Sensation.) The slaves believe in a Jesus that strikes off chains. In this country, Jesus has become obsolete. A profession in him is no longer a test. Who objects to his course in Judaea? The old Pharisees are extinct, and may safely be denounced.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
t the slave, and all the sects are combined to prevent that jubilee which it is the will of God should come. . . Be not startled when I say that a belief in Jesus is no evidence of goodness (hisses); no, friends. Voice — Yes it is. Mr. Garrison--Our friend says yes; my position is no. It is worthless as a test, for the reason I have already assigned in reference to the other tests. His praises are sung in Louisiana, Alabama, and the other Southern States just as well as in Massachusetts. Captain Rynders--Are you aware that the slaves in the South have their prayermeetings in honor of Christ? Mr. Garrison--Not a slaveholding or a slave-breeding Jesus. (Sensation.) The slaves believe in a Jesus that strikes off chains. In this country, Jesus has become obsolete. A profession in him is no longer a test. Who objects to his course in Judaea? The old Pharisees are extinct, and may safely be denounced. Jesus is the most respectable person in the United States. (
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
At this time Zachary Taylor, a slaveholder and a devout Episcopalian, was president of the United States. The situation was a difficult one for the Evangelical, anti-sectarian mind to deal withisees are extinct, and may safely be denounced. Jesus is the most respectable person in the United States. (Great sensation, and murmurs of disapprobation.) Jesus sits in the President's chair of the United States. (A thrill of horror here seemed to run through the assembly.) Zachary Taylor sits there, which is the same thing, for he believes in Jesus. He believes in war, and the Jesus that Captain Rynders (clenching his fist)--I will not allow you to assail the President of the United States. You shan't do it (shaking his fist at Mr. Garrison). Many voices — Turn him out, turn Captain Rynders--If a million of you were there, I would not allow the President of the United States to be insulted. As long as you confined yourself to your subject, I did not interfere; but
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
proved dull and tiresome, and was made sport of by his own set, whom Mr. Garrison had to call to order. There were now loud cries for Frederick Douglass, who came forward to where Rynders stood in the conspicuous position he had taken when he thought the meeting was his, and who remained in it, too mortified even to creep away, when he found it was somebody else's. Now you can speak, said he to Douglass; but mind what I say: if you speak disrespectfully (of the South, or Washington, or Patrick Henry) I'll knock you off the stage. Nothing daunted, the ex-fugitive from greater terrors began: The gentleman who has just spoken has undertaken to prove that the blacks are not human beings. He has examined our whole conformation, from top to toe. I cannot follow him in his argument. I will assist him in it, however. I offer myself for your examination. Am I a man? The audience responded with a thunderous affirmative, which Captain Rynders sought to break by exclaiming: You
Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
l disrespect for the Constitution, actual disruption and annihilation of the Union, and a cessation of all order, legal or divine, which does not square with his narrow views of what constitutes human liberty. Never, in the time of the French Revolution and blasphemous atheism, was there more malevolence and unblushing wickedness avowed than by this same Garrison. Indeed, he surpasses Robespierre and his associates, for he has no design of building up. His only object is to destroy. . . .In Boston, a few months ago, a convention was held, the object of which was the overthrow of Sunday worship. Thus it appears that nothing divine or secular is respected by these fanatics. . . When free discussion does not promote the public good, it has no more right to exist than a bad government that is dangerous and oppressive to the common weal. It should be overthrown. On the question of usefulness to the public of the packed, organized meetings of these Abolitionists, socialists, Sabbath-br
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
fice as Weigher in the Custom-house of the metropolis. He found time, while thus employed, to engineer the Astor Place riot on behalf of the actor Forrest against his English rival Macready, on May Io, 1849, and the year 1850 opened with his trial for this atrocity and his successful defense by John Van Buren. On February 16 he and his Club broke up an anti-Wilmot-Proviso meeting in New York — a seeming inconsistency, but it was charged against Rynders that he had offered to give the State of New York to Clay in the election of 1844 for $30,000, and had met with reluctant refusal. In March he was arrested for a brutal assault on a gentleman in a hotel, but the victim and the witnesses found it prudent not to appear against a ruffian who did not hesitate to threaten the district-attorney in open court. Meanwhile, the new Whig Administration quite justifiably discharged Rynders from the Custom-house, leaving him free to pose as a savior of the Union against traitorsa savior of soci
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
hem, nor to the Baptists, nor the Methodists; for they, too, are against the slave, and all the sects are combined to prevent that jubilee which it is the will of God should come. . . Be not startled when I say that a belief in Jesus is no evidence of goodness (hisses); no, friends. Voice — Yes it is. Mr. Garrison--Our friend says yes; my position is no. It is worthless as a test, for the reason I have already assigned in reference to the other tests. His praises are sung in Louisiana, Alabama, and the other Southern States just as well as in Massachusetts. Captain Rynders--Are you aware that the slaves in the South have their prayermeetings in honor of Christ? Mr. Garrison--Not a slaveholding or a slave-breeding Jesus. (Sensation.) The slaves believe in a Jesus that strikes off chains. In this country, Jesus has become obsolete. A profession in him is no longer a test. Who objects to his course in Judaea? The old Pharisees are extinct, and may safely be de
Hudson River (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
York we may anticipate that there are those who will enter the arena of discussion, and send out the true opinion of the public. . . The meeting of May 7, at the Tabernacle, was a vast assembly which contained many respectable people, intermingled with whom was an organized element of impending mob. The leader of the mob was a wellknow ruffian called Isaiah Rynders, a native American, of mixed German and Irish lineage, now some forty-six years of age. He began life as a boatman on the Hudson River, and, passing easily into the sporting class, went to seek his fortunes as a professional gambler in the paradise of the Southwest. In this region he became familiar with all forms of violence, including the institution of slavery. After many personal hazards and vicissitudes, he returned to New York city, where he proved to be admirably qualified for local political leadership in connection with Tammany Hall. A sportinghouse which he opened became a Democratic rendezvous and the head
Samuel R. Ward (search for this): chapter 9
into your tea. We would do more if allowed. Yes, said a voice in the crowd, you would cut our throats for us. No, was the quick response, but we would cut your hair for you. Douglass concluded his triumphant remarks by calling upon the Rev. Samuel R. Ward, editor of the Impartial Citizen, to succeed him. All eyes, says Dr. Furness, were instantly turned to the back of the platform, or stage rather, so dramatic was the scene; and there, amidst a group, stood a large man, so black that, as Wendell Phillips said, when he shut his eyes you could not see him. As he approached, Rynders exclaimed: Well, this is the original nigger. I've heard of the magnanimity of Captain Rynders, said Ward, but the half has not been told me! And then he went on with a noble voice and his speech was such a strain of eloquence as I never heard excelled before or since. The mob had to applaud him, too, and it is the highest praise to record that his unpremeditated utterance maintained the level of Do
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