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k, on his wedding trip. These facts I find announced to the people of Caddo, and to all the happy hunting-fields between Red River and Limestone Gap: When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for the editor of a public journal to chronicle to an anxious and waiting world the glad tidings of his own nuptials, modesty would dictate that it be done in as few words as the solemnity of the occasion will admit. Adhering to this principle, we will simply say that on the eighteenth instant, at Fort Washita, C. N. Granville McPherson, of the Indian Territory, and Mrs. Lydia Star Hunter, of Oskaloosa, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony Well, strange things will happen sometimes, and why not with us as well any? Strange tilings will happen! Yes, strange things indeed. To gain a right of settlement in the Choctaw country, Granville McPherson should have taken to himself a Choctaw bride, instead of whom he has married irs. Star Hunter, of Oskaloosa, Iowa. Granv
wealth. One day they sell at a dollar each,--the man is worth twenty pounds; another day they sell at five hundred dollars each — the man is worth ten thousand pounds. This record of an actual fact is but a sample of the thousand stories told you at the Union and Pacific Clubs. Two years ago, when prices shot up suddenly, shares in Crown Point advanced in a few weeks from ten shillings a share to ninety-two pounds. A man of my acquaintance in this city held a thousand of these shares. In March they would have brought him five hundred pounds, in October they were sold for ninety-two thousand pounds. In seven months the poor man had become a man of means; enriched by one of those strokes of fortune that a gambler loves even more than he loves minted gold. Such cases are not rare, yet, as a whole, the gainers by these great financial fevers are the citizens who own mines. Five or six magnates of finance in San Francisco are said to have got one-third of those fifty million doll
Chapter 22: Indian seers. Red Cloud is an example, and no more than an example, of a Red Brigham Young. At Green River, in the territory of Utah, we find the details of a recent drama, every scene in which would be a parody on the Mormon pope, if Brigham Young were not himself a parody on these Indian seers. In March last year an Indian prophet came into a camp of wandering Utes near Tierra Amarilla, in New Mexico, bringing a message to this tribe of Utes from their Great Spirit. The man was known to be a Saint; a Red dervish and magician, with a great repute among his people; a wizard who had passed through many circles and was privileged to talk with God. The Utes were hunters, living in their tents under Sabeta and Cornea, two big chiefs, and several smaller chiefs. Their camp was pitched in pleasant places, on a running water, in the midst of grass, shaded by cedar and cotton-wood. Each tent was set apart, the cross-poles peering upwards through the buffalo skins.
March 19th (search for this): chapter 11
ons they determined and in their verdict declared you unworthy to live. Of that verdict there can be but one opinion — that of unqualified approval. Upon this verdict the law declares the judgment, and speaking through the Court, awards the doom — a penalty commensurate with the crime of which you stand convicted, and therein merited by the threefold murder that stains your hands. The judgment is-death. That you be taken hence and securely kept by the sheriff of Santa Clara county until Friday, the 19th day of March, 1875. That upon that day, between the hours of nine o'clock in the morning and four in the afternoon, you be by him hanged by the neck until you are dead. And may God have mercy on your soul. He was taken out and hung accordingly. An attempt at rescue was expected; but the White citizens were ready; the lower classes saw that the case was desperate; and on Friday, March 19, Capitan Vasquez, the most famous brigand in California, dangled from a tree in San Jo
his neighbour's ox as readily as he slings a buffalo calf. White men shoot game in sport, on which bucks and braves go out and kill their enemy's cows. They say it is only sport. When a more deadly raid is meant, they call the Light Horse, the Mourning Band, or some such Indian league, and riding to the settled parts, select a lonely ranch, surround the pales, rush on the doors, scalp every living male, eat up the food, set fire to the farms, and carry off the women to their camps. In May last year a son of Little Robe, a Cheyenne chief, came over the border into Kansas with his band. His herds, he said, had been driven by White thieves, and in revenge, he stole a herd of cattle from the nearest run. Some cavalry, then patrolling on the Kansas line, gave chase, came up with the marauders, mauled the chief, and recovered the stolen stock. Unable to meet the Whites in open field, the Cheyennes, in accordance with their custom and the genius of their league, are using the kni
Spence at Monterey, the lad must go to mass, but only for the sake of order and uniformity. Let him sit through mass and vespers daily, and a boy may keep his father's creed; but every pupil of the college must attend religious worship, and the only exercises of religion at Santa Clara are those of Rome. Compared with Christ Church and Trinity, the college is a prison. The scholastic year consists of one session of ten months, lasting from the first week in August to the first week in June. During this long term a pupil hardly ever quits the place. No scholar is received for less than half a year. Ten days are given at Christmas to rest and absence, but the greatest care is taken lest the boy should stray in the wicked world. A lad whose parents live in Santa Clara has a slight advantage; he may go to see those parents once a month; but only for an hour or so in the afternoon, and on the strict condition of coming back before dusk. No pupil of the Jesuits can be trusted in
a Clara. As in the case of Spence at Monterey, the lad must go to mass, but only for the sake of order and uniformity. Let him sit through mass and vespers daily, and a boy may keep his father's creed; but every pupil of the college must attend religious worship, and the only exercises of religion at Santa Clara are those of Rome. Compared with Christ Church and Trinity, the college is a prison. The scholastic year consists of one session of ten months, lasting from the first week in August to the first week in June. During this long term a pupil hardly ever quits the place. No scholar is received for less than half a year. Ten days are given at Christmas to rest and absence, but the greatest care is taken lest the boy should stray in the wicked world. A lad whose parents live in Santa Clara has a slight advantage; he may go to see those parents once a month; but only for an hour or so in the afternoon, and on the strict condition of coming back before dusk. No pupil of th
e country were received. Hither came every one who wished to make a fortune, or to thrive at court. Reports were sent from other missions to Santa Clara; every rescript and command was issued from Santa Clara. Santa Clara was the court and capital of this Franciscan Commonwealth. The brethren of St. Francis failed to establish a sacred Commonwealth in Upper California, and their work has passed into other and stronger hands. They failed, as the English church failed in Ireland, as the Sept-Insular Republic failed in Greece, from lack of nationality. Even at the best their rule was alien, and supported from without. They had no root in the soil. Yet who can say, with justice. of the Franciscan brethren, that they failed so signally as to deserve no record of their work, no pity in their fall. Some of the brethren may have been imperfect in their lives. Being flesh and blood, they must have caught some virus from the soil. They were not always meek. A bad friar may have l
orth twenty pounds; another day they sell at five hundred dollars each — the man is worth ten thousand pounds. This record of an actual fact is but a sample of the thousand stories told you at the Union and Pacific Clubs. Two years ago, when prices shot up suddenly, shares in Crown Point advanced in a few weeks from ten shillings a share to ninety-two pounds. A man of my acquaintance in this city held a thousand of these shares. In March they would have brought him five hundred pounds, in October they were sold for ninety-two thousand pounds. In seven months the poor man had become a man of means; enriched by one of those strokes of fortune that a gambler loves even more than he loves minted gold. Such cases are not rare, yet, as a whole, the gainers by these great financial fevers are the citizens who own mines. Five or six magnates of finance in San Francisco are said to have got one-third of those fifty million dollars under lock and key. Our fortunes kill us, says a sa
December 12th (search for this): chapter 24
the charge into their sides. The man had evidently retired in the belief that they were killed. Every man in Carterville knew the murderer, but no one cared to raise the hue and cry. They said it was an old feud; a family quarrel, like the strife of Guelph and Ghibelline, of Ute and Snake. Last time, the victim was a Bulliner; this time he is a Sisney. If the two families like to have a feud of blood, what right has any one to interfere? What day is this, the villagers ask? Twelfth day of December! Was not Bulliner shot this very day last year? Has any of the Sisney party suffered for that crime? It is but turn about. So reason all the tribe of Sheriff Frank. A murder was committed in the previous year. Who doubts that some of the Bulliner family had marked this day for Sisney's death? On searching out the facts, I find a story of vendetta in the Prairie lands, which for vindictive passion equals the most brutal quarrels in Ajaccio and the Monte d'oro; almost rivals
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