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Los Angeles (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
t that could do me injury. Yet men may be betrayed who never give their trust, even to the women they profess to love. His wounds being dressed, the brigand has been brought to San Jose, where he is nearer to the white settlements, than at Los Angeles. At San Jose, he is overshadowed by the power of San Francisco. San Jose, one of the Free Towns, has, like Los Angeles, a lower class of mongrel breed and vicious life; one of the great sinks from which such chiefs as Soto and Vasquez draLos Angeles, a lower class of mongrel breed and vicious life; one of the great sinks from which such chiefs as Soto and Vasquez draw their bands. But these bad elements in the town, though rough and noisy, quail before the steady courage of the upper class --White men of British race, who having grown rich as advocates and physicians, bankers and merchants, have built their country houses on Coyote Creek; converting a camp of troops and squaws, with their unruly progeny, into a paradise of villas, colleges, and schools. These new comers are enrolled as vigilants, and are masters of the town. While waiting trial, Vasqu
San Jose (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ey profess to love. His wounds being dressed, the brigand has been brought to San Jose, where he is nearer to the white settlements, than at Los Angeles. At San JosSan Jose, he is overshadowed by the power of San Francisco. San Jose, one of the Free Towns, has, like Los Angeles, a lower class of mongrel breed and vicious life; one San Jose, one of the Free Towns, has, like Los Angeles, a lower class of mongrel breed and vicious life; one of the great sinks from which such chiefs as Soto and Vasquez draw their bands. But these bad elements in the town, though rough and noisy, quail before the steady clove which thousands share with him. They make his cause their own. No jury in San Jose will dare to find Tiburcio Vasquez guilty of a capital crime. An English see; and whether the jury find him guilty or not guilty, Vasquez will be hung at San Jose. This settler speaks the truth. The British race is master in these valley the lower classes saw that the case was desperate; and on Friday, March 19, Capitan Vasquez, the most famous brigand in California, dangled from a tree in San Jose.
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
with a sneer: I never trusted women in my life. Not with the secret of your hiding-places in the hills? No, Senor; I never put myself in any woman's power, by telling her a secret that could do me injury. Yet men may be betrayed who never give their trust, even to the women they profess to love. His wounds being dressed, the brigand has been brought to San Jose, where he is nearer to the white settlements, than at Los Angeles. At San Jose, he is overshadowed by the power of San Francisco. San Jose, one of the Free Towns, has, like Los Angeles, a lower class of mongrel breed and vicious life; one of the great sinks from which such chiefs as Soto and Vasquez draw their bands. But these bad elements in the town, though rough and noisy, quail before the steady courage of the upper class --White men of British race, who having grown rich as advocates and physicians, bankers and merchants, have built their country houses on Coyote Creek; converting a camp of troops and sq
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ons they determined and in their verdict declared you unworthy to live. Of that verdict there can be but one opinion — that of unqualified approval. Upon this verdict the law declares the judgment, and speaking through the Court, awards the doom — a penalty commensurate with the crime of which you stand convicted, and therein merited by the threefold murder that stains your hands. The judgment is-death. That you be taken hence and securely kept by the sheriff of Santa Clara county until Friday, the 19th day of March, 1875. That upon that day, between the hours of nine o'clock in the morning and four in the afternoon, you be by him hanged by the neck until you are dead. And may God have mercy on your soul. He was taken out and hung accordingly. An attempt at rescue was expected; but the White citizens were ready; the lower classes saw that the case was desperate; and on Friday, March 19, Capitan Vasquez, the most famous brigand in California, dangled from a tree in San Jo
Santa Clara County (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
in their deliberations they determined and in their verdict declared you unworthy to live. Of that verdict there can be but one opinion — that of unqualified approval. Upon this verdict the law declares the judgment, and speaking through the Court, awards the doom — a penalty commensurate with the crime of which you stand convicted, and therein merited by the threefold murder that stains your hands. The judgment is-death. That you be taken hence and securely kept by the sheriff of Santa Clara county until Friday, the 19th day of March, 1875. That upon that day, between the hours of nine o'clock in the morning and four in the afternoon, you be by him hanged by the neck until you are dead. And may God have mercy on your soul. He was taken out and hung accordingly. An attempt at rescue was expected; but the White citizens were ready; the lower classes saw that the case was desperate; and on Friday, March 19, Capitan Vasquez, the most famous brigand in California, dangled from
e bold wooer and the false wife, not with the deceived and outraged husband. Leiva admitted he was jealous, and that his jealousy drove him to betray his chief; but he denied that any of the facts which he had stated under oath were false. Judge Belden told the jury that a man's oath is not to be rejected on the ground that his wife has violated her marriage vow. This rule of law, so simple to an English ear, is inconceivable to a Mexican. If a wife is false, the Mexican thinks her husbandll do any deed, swear any lie. The fact that he is wronged in his honour makes him a criminal, not to be credited on his oath. An English jury, having no difficulty in accepting Leiva's evidence, found a verdict of guilty against the brigand. Belden deferred his sentence till an appeal for a new trial was heard and dismissed. Then he addressed the bandit, in words which burn with all the passion of the White Conquest, when the White conquerors have been provoked by deeds of blood: Tibur
Adon Leiva (search for this): chapter 11
e him, that he never killed a man in his life — not even Davidson. Leiva, he says, shot all the three men who were butchered at Tres Pinos. osalia's love, in fair rivalry against her husband, he asserts that Leiva, like a jealous cur, betrayed him to the sheriffs out of envy at thVasquez being rather Indian than Spanish in character. Vasquez and Leiva were pictured to the jury as rivals in love with the same woman; Vasquez having advantages of person, Leiva advantages of position. Any reference to Leiva's rights as Rosalia's husband was thought superfluouLeiva's rights as Rosalia's husband was thought superfluous. Rosalia was represented as fair game for any lover to run down and capture. Vasquez ran her down; on which his rival, stung by jealousy,er and the false wife, not with the deceived and outraged husband. Leiva admitted he was jealous, and that his jealousy drove him to betray ed on his oath. An English jury, having no difficulty in accepting Leiva's evidence, found a verdict of guilty against the brigand. Belde
Capitan Soto (search for this): chapter 11
telling her a secret that could do me injury. Yet men may be betrayed who never give their trust, even to the women they profess to love. His wounds being dressed, the brigand has been brought to San Jose, where he is nearer to the white settlements, than at Los Angeles. At San Jose, he is overshadowed by the power of San Francisco. San Jose, one of the Free Towns, has, like Los Angeles, a lower class of mongrel breed and vicious life; one of the great sinks from which such chiefs as Soto and Vasquez draw their bands. But these bad elements in the town, though rough and noisy, quail before the steady courage of the upper class --White men of British race, who having grown rich as advocates and physicians, bankers and merchants, have built their country houses on Coyote Creek; converting a camp of troops and squaws, with their unruly progeny, into a paradise of villas, colleges, and schools. These new comers are enrolled as vigilants, and are masters of the town. While wai
ds being dressed, the brigand has been brought to San Jose, where he is nearer to the white settlements, than at Los Angeles. At San Jose, he is overshadowed by the power of San Francisco. San Jose, one of the Free Towns, has, like Los Angeles, a lower class of mongrel breed and vicious life; one of the great sinks from which such chiefs as Soto and Vasquez draw their bands. But these bad elements in the town, though rough and noisy, quail before the steady courage of the upper class --White men of British race, who having grown rich as advocates and physicians, bankers and merchants, have built their country houses on Coyote Creek; converting a camp of troops and squaws, with their unruly progeny, into a paradise of villas, colleges, and schools. These new comers are enrolled as vigilants, and are masters of the town. While waiting trial, Vasquez is behaving like a true half-breed, lying in the faces of his friends, boasting of his noble deeds, and acting basely towards the
ee him in his cell, he takes a tone of gallantry, yet with an air and distance flattering to their sex. I am distressed, a lady says, to see so brave a man as you in such a place. Sefiora, smirks the brigand, if I were as brave as you believe me, I should never have been here at all. Well, sighs his visitor, touching his bandaged fingers, I am grieved to think they caught you in the ranch. He looks into her eyes, and lifting up his wounded hands, exclaims, Que las bendiciones de Dias sean siempre contigo! --(may the blessings of God be showered on you for ever more). His cell is full of gifts-food, clothes, and money; sent by his admiring countrymen and more admiring countrywomen. A purse is being raised for his defence, and every one expects a stormy trial, a timid jury, and a doubtful sentence. No one dares convict him, sas a Mexican, who is sitting next to me at table. Not if he is guilty of three murders? Not if he is guilty of a hundred murders-as t
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