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Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
oner was drawing his people into a snare — that is to say, into a conflict with the stronger power. He spent his eloquence in vain. A cry of Slaves and Whisky filled his camp; and when the chief withdrew to Bushey Creek, near Verdigris River, he was followed by a cloud of warriors yelling for free trade in slaves and whisky, and was driven to fall back for safety on the White settlements of Kansas. Article ninety-seven of the treaty of alliance signed by Jack Ross on behalf of the Cherokee nation, and by Albert Pike on behalf of the Confederate States, contains this clause: It is hereby declared and agreed that the Institution of Slavery in the said nation is legal, and has existed from time immemorial; that slaves are taken and esteemed to be personal property; that the title to slaves and other property having its origin in the said Nation shall be determined by the laws and customs thereof; and that the slaves and other personal property of every person domiciled in sai
Verdigris (United States) (search for this): chapter 28
every man and woman in the Indian camps. By offering to secure the Indians free trade in slaves and whisky, Albert Pike secured a great majority of voices for the South. Opothleyolo, a Creek chief, tried to stem the tide, believing that this Slave Commissioner was drawing his people into a snare — that is to say, into a conflict with the stronger power. He spent his eloquence in vain. A cry of Slaves and Whisky filled his camp; and when the chief withdrew to Bushey Creek, near Verdigris River, he was followed by a cloud of warriors yelling for free trade in slaves and whisky, and was driven to fall back for safety on the White settlements of Kansas. Article ninety-seven of the treaty of alliance signed by Jack Ross on behalf of the Cherokee nation, and by Albert Pike on behalf of the Confederate States, contains this clause: It is hereby declared and agreed that the Institution of Slavery in the said nation is legal, and has existed from time immemorial; that slaves
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
were fading fast, the Negroes were increasing fast. These Negroes were a danger and a curse to each of the five Red nations. A sentiment was growing up on every side, which the Redskins were unable to repulse by tomahawk and scalping-knife. Kansas, their immediate neighbour on the north, was Free Soil. The settlements in their rear were rising into Free States. From time to time Free Soilers came into their hunting-grounds, sniffing the air, glancing at the slaves, and threatening the sa and Whisky filled his camp; and when the chief withdrew to Bushey Creek, near Verdigris River, he was followed by a cloud of warriors yelling for free trade in slaves and whisky, and was driven to fall back for safety on the White settlements of Kansas. Article ninety-seven of the treaty of alliance signed by Jack Ross on behalf of the Cherokee nation, and by Albert Pike on behalf of the Confederate States, contains this clause: It is hereby declared and agreed that the Institution of S
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 28
solution of a great and difficult social problem was committed to the sword. Then Jefferson Davis sent an agent to the Indian lodges, with the object of exciting Creek and Choctaw fears, and drawing the Indian chiefs into a league with the Confederate States. Albert Pike, this agent, was in figure and repute adapted for his work. A man of portly frame and rosy face, he wore a veil of silver hair, which hung about his neck in clouds; giving him the jovial look of youth combined with the aspade in slaves and whisky, and was driven to fall back for safety on the White settlements of Kansas. Article ninety-seven of the treaty of alliance signed by Jack Ross on behalf of the Cherokee nation, and by Albert Pike on behalf of the Confederate States, contains this clause: It is hereby declared and agreed that the Institution of Slavery in the said nation is legal, and has existed from time immemorial; that slaves are taken and esteemed to be personal property; that the title to sl
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
eorgia or Carolina, where the society was divided into free men and bondmen. He and his brethren of the tribe were free, and only the less martial and more dusky race were bond. Acquainted with the Pale men's ways, he paid them the moral tribute of walking in their steps, but, with the instinct of a savage, he only bought his slaves when he could not carry them off by stealth. When a Creek or Seminole chief was driven by the White planters from his hunting-grounds in .282 Georgia and Tennessee, he took the Negroes in his camp along with him, compelling them to share the misery of his long march, and brave the perils of his new and distant home. Such ills as fell on the Red savage fell with sevenfold fiury on his slave. A Negro was no better in an Indian's eyes than a mule. In rain and wind he had to lie outside the tent. When game ran short he had to feed on garbage and to starve. All base and menial offices were thrust on him. A squaw is seldom kind to any creature weake
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
he aim of every Creek and Seminole chief. Negroes, like squaws, were evidence of his wealth and rank; more grateful in his eyes than squaws, as being a property which he held in common with the Whites. In ,early days he had lived in Georgia or Carolina, where the society was divided into free men and bondmen. He and his brethren of the tribe were free, and only the less martial and more dusky race were bond. Acquainted with the Pale men's ways, he paid them the moral tribute of walking in thch is the fecundity of men in servitude, that the Negroes grew in numbers under all their wrongs; and that so rapidly that in twenty or twenty-five years they promised to out-count their savage owners. No attempts were made to breed them, as in Carolina and Virginia, for the markets. Young and pretty Negresses were swept into the wigwam; old and ugly women, whether Black or Red, were handed over to these dusky swains. Yet while the hunters brought plenty of food into the camps, the Negro race
eld binding within the scope of their operation. Even from the pen of Albert Pike such passages come as a surprise. Slavery in the Indian nation legal! Why, the Indians had no code, and slavery had never been sanctioned by a public Act. Slavery existing among Red men from time immemorial! Why, slavery was absolutely unknown to any Indian tribe in the days of Ross's grandfather. No such falsehoods were inserted by Confederate agents in the Acts which from their nature must be read in Europe. Davis was extremely cautious in his words. He spoke of slavery as a fact-but only as a fact. Stephens, a bolder man, advancing from the sphere of facts into that of principles, asserted that Negro slavery was based on a great physical, philosophical, and moral truth ; but Stephens never ventured to proclaim that Negro slavery had existed from time immemorial on the American continent. In fact, this fervid orator, convinced that the rule proposed by him had no historical basis, actually
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
on under which they had lived was gone; gone like the old Indian League of the Six Nations, never to be renewed on earth. The flag was rent to shreds, the flagstaff snapt in two. The gentry of the South could never again join hands with the hucksters of the North. He bade them. choose their side. Slavery, he said, was the cornerstone of the new Confederacy; and pointing to a group of Negro slaves, he asked them whether they would not cast in their lot with the planters of Georgia and Louisiana, rather than with the traders of Boston and New York. You may have had some cause in former times to rail against the planters, he remarked, but in this new war your interests and your destinies are inseparably connected with those of the South. The war is one of Northern cupidity and fanaticism against African slavery, commercial freedom, and political liberty. To gain his ends, Pike had recourse to other means. Cavour had the merit of seeing that his countrymen wanted two good thi
Cherokee (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
nes, and wait until the night came down? At dusk they stole into the field, and passing through the sleeping soldiers, scalped the dying and the dead, and carried off their trophies to the camp. These were the only blows the Indians ever struck for the possession of their Negro slaves. Next day the scalpless men pvere found by burying-parties, and a cry rose up from both American camps against employment of such savages. Curtis sent a message to Van Dorn, and to avoid retaliation, the Confederate General was obliged to, order his Ied contingent to go home. Pike lost his lace and feathers, and his Creek and Cherokee warriors had to stand aside, solaced by whisky, till the White men who were quarrelling among themselves over Black rights and wrongs, had settled under the walls of Richmond whether a Redskin living on the Arkansas should, or should not, continue to hold his Black brother in a state of servitude. When Richmond fell the slaves in fifty Indian camps were free.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
idence of his wealth and rank; more grateful in his eyes than squaws, as being a property which he held in common with the Whites. In ,early days he had lived in Georgia or Carolina, where the society was divided into free men and bondmen. He and his brethren of the tribe were free, and only the less martial and more dusky race wought his slaves when he could not carry them off by stealth. When a Creek or Seminole chief was driven by the White planters from his hunting-grounds in .282 Georgia and Tennessee, he took the Negroes in his camp along with him, compelling them to share the misery of his long march, and brave the perils of his new and distant was the cornerstone of the new Confederacy; and pointing to a group of Negro slaves, he asked them whether they would not cast in their lot with the planters of Georgia and Louisiana, rather than with the traders of Boston and New York. You may have had some cause in former times to rail against the planters, he remarked, but i
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