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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Benin (Benin) (search for this): chapter 35
Texas, Louisiana is a country in which the scalawags and carpet-baggers may chance to find a majority of voters on their side. Since every Negro is a citizen and every citizen has a vote, what is to prevent this mass of coloured people from choosing a Black lawgiver and framing a Black code? United they might carry any chief and aly bill. They might have a Fanti sheriff, a Mandingo judge. Acting as one man, like a mass of Celtic voters, they might legalise in America the customs of Yam, Dahomey, and Adai. The African brain is limited in range. Oranges, massa! Hab oranges? cries a stalwart Negro in the street. How much a dozen, eh? Four for a quarter, massa, four for a quarter! Yes, the fellow asks no less than threepence each; though oranges are so plentiful at Brashear, that if he fails to sell them in the cars, he will hardly take the trouble to carry them home. A quarter for four, Sam! Why, when you have sent them all the way to London you will only ask
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ween Indianola, in Texas, and Brashear, in Louisiana, skirts two of the rich Gulf States, and connects the port of Galveston with the river at New Orleans. She carries few natives, either Mexican or American. Her passengers, like her crew, are mostly Scotch and English; for the ports and towns in Texas are nearly all built by British capital and settled by British families. It is the old, old story of our race. Who planted Virginia and Massachusetts? Who peopled Georgia, Pennsylvania, Maryland? The seventeenth century only saw at James Town and Plymouth Rock what the nineteenth century beholds in the Gulf of Mexico. The English race is moving on the West. London and Liverpool are pouring out our wealth and population on these coasts-our surplus capital, our adventurous sons. This power of drawing on the parent country for supports is the chief mainstay of White America. Apart from passing politics, the Conservatives hold that time is always fighting on their side. White
Indianola (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
he adjoining country from our sight. The waves are long and smooth. A flock of snow-birds flutter in our wake, and swoop with easy undulation on their prey. A semi-tropical languor lies on every face. As day comes on the mist clears off, and through the vanishing haze we catch along the shores a fringe of cypress and cotton-wood, with roots in swamp and pool, and branches hung with vegetable filth — the noisome and funereal weed called Spanish moss. Our vessel, plying between Indianola, in Texas, and Brashear, in Louisiana, skirts two of the rich Gulf States, and connects the port of Galveston with the river at New Orleans. She carries few natives, either Mexican or American. Her passengers, like her crew, are mostly Scotch and English; for the ports and towns in Texas are nearly all built by British capital and settled by British families. It is the old, old story of our race. Who planted Virginia and Massachusetts? Who peopled Georgia, Pennsylvania, Maryland? The sev
North America (search for this): chapter 35
enth century beholds in the Gulf of Mexico. The English race is moving on the West. London and Liverpool are pouring out our wealth and population on these coasts-our surplus capital, our adventurous sons. This power of drawing on the parent country for supports is the chief mainstay of White America. Apart from passing politics, the Conservatives hold that time is always fighting on their side. White men increase in freedom. In a hundred years the White family has increased in North America from less than three millions to more than thirty millions. Who knows whether the Black family will increase in freedom? Every fact appears to point another way. The Whites are recruited from Europe, the Blacks are not recruited from Africa. One force expands, the other wanes. Yet what a power of mischief this low and waning branch of the human family possesses; a power which wounds and weakens every section of America; setting brother against brother, North against South, the disci
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
Our vessel, plying between Indianola, in Texas, and Brashear, in Louisiana, skirts two of the rich Gulf States, and connects the port of Galveston with the river at New Orleans. She carries few natives, either Mexican or American. Her passengers, like her crew, are mostly Scotch and English; for the ports and towns in Texas are nearly all built by British capital and settled by British families. It is the old, old story of our race. Who planted Virginia and Massachusetts? Who peopled Georgia, Pennsylvania, Maryland? The seventeenth century only saw at James Town and Plymouth Rock what the nineteenth century beholds in the Gulf of Mexico. The English race is moving on the West. London and Liverpool are pouring out our wealth and population on these coasts-our surplus capital, our adventurous sons. This power of drawing on the parent country for supports is the chief mainstay of White America. Apart from passing politics, the Conservatives hold that time is always fighti
Plymouth Rock (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
of the rich Gulf States, and connects the port of Galveston with the river at New Orleans. She carries few natives, either Mexican or American. Her passengers, like her crew, are mostly Scotch and English; for the ports and towns in Texas are nearly all built by British capital and settled by British families. It is the old, old story of our race. Who planted Virginia and Massachusetts? Who peopled Georgia, Pennsylvania, Maryland? The seventeenth century only saw at James Town and Plymouth Rock what the nineteenth century beholds in the Gulf of Mexico. The English race is moving on the West. London and Liverpool are pouring out our wealth and population on these coasts-our surplus capital, our adventurous sons. This power of drawing on the parent country for supports is the chief mainstay of White America. Apart from passing politics, the Conservatives hold that time is always fighting on their side. White men increase in freedom. In a hundred years the White family h
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
weed called Spanish moss. Our vessel, plying between Indianola, in Texas, and Brashear, in Louisiana, skirts two of the rich Gulf States, and connects the port of Galveston with the river at New grows in every marsh and pool, round every lake and bay. You find it in Eastern Texas and Southern Louisiana, in Western Florida, and among the inland waters of Alabama. This parasite is ugly, fce Mandingo fathers. Glancing through the lanes of Brashear, you perceive that, unlike Texas, Louisiana is a country in which the scalawags and carpet-baggers may chance to find a majority of voterse same as though he were to gather a thousand, but his brain has no conception of scale. In Louisiana, the Negroes count a clear, though not a large, majority of votes, and claim to have a clear mal troops. Their nominee, William P. Kellogg, is recognised by President Grant as Governor of Louisiana. Yet see the train in which we are going towards New Orleans! By law, a Negro is the White's
James Town (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
iana, skirts two of the rich Gulf States, and connects the port of Galveston with the river at New Orleans. She carries few natives, either Mexican or American. Her passengers, like her crew, are mostly Scotch and English; for the ports and towns in Texas are nearly all built by British capital and settled by British families. It is the old, old story of our race. Who planted Virginia and Massachusetts? Who peopled Georgia, Pennsylvania, Maryland? The seventeenth century only saw at James Town and Plymouth Rock what the nineteenth century beholds in the Gulf of Mexico. The English race is moving on the West. London and Liverpool are pouring out our wealth and population on these coasts-our surplus capital, our adventurous sons. This power of drawing on the parent country for supports is the chief mainstay of White America. Apart from passing politics, the Conservatives hold that time is always fighting on their side. White men increase in freedom. In a hundred years th
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
cobwebs, of dull mouse-colour, from every branch. Observe this weed, a resident in Brashear says to me, when showing us the lions of his hamlet. You see it in a place-get off as quickly as your horse will trot. We call it fever-moss. It is a sign that chills and fevers hang about. The weed seems widely spread; we see it everywhere along the Gulf. Along this Gulf disease and death are widely spread. It grows in every marsh and pool, round every lake and bay. You find it in Eastern Texas and Southern Louisiana, in Western Florida, and among the inland waters of Alabama. This parasite is ugly, fcetid, and of little use. Negroes rake it down and bury it in the earth. In ten or twelve days the stench dies out, and then they dig it up and dry it in the sun. When crisp and hard, they stuff it into mattresses and pillows in place of straw. Negroes are said to like sleeping on this dried fever-moss. Brashear is a colony of Negroes, and a stronghold of the Black League.
Brashear City (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ur vessel, plying between Indianola, in Texas, and Brashear, in Louisiana, skirts two of the rich Gulf States,ver, on the eastern bank of which lies the port of Brashear: a place created out of chaos, by the necessity whleans in little more than twenty-four hours. Is Brashear land or water? Slush and mud, gutter and pool, basin and drain, all meet in Brashear; a dismal swamp and fever-den, enclosed on every side with jungle, in whicom every branch. Observe this weed, a resident in Brashear says to me, when showing us the lions of his hamlsaid to like sleeping on this dried fever-moss. Brashear is a colony of Negroes, and a stronghold of the Blhe boats and trains, no White inhabitants dwell in Brashear. Every doorway shows a Negro, every gutter a duskMandingo fathers. Glancing through the lanes of Brashear, you perceive that, unlike Texas, Louisiana is a chreepence each; though oranges are so plentiful at Brashear, that if he fails to sell them in the cars, he wil
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