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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
of the State House, seized the Great Seal of Louisiana, and proclaimed his advent to the world. Seou are recognized as the lawful Executive of Louisiana, and that the body assembled at the Mechanicions could be argued in the Supreme Court of Louisiana, and in no other place. For Elmore to hear d not cancel his decision, and the judges of Louisiana cited him for contempt of court. He only jeators found that Kellogg was not Governor of Louisiana; that his signature was worthless; that the broad seal of Louisiana had been improperly used; and that Pinchback had no claim to sit in Congres that Kellogg was not the lawful Governor of Louisiana, and Pinchback not the lawful Senator for LoLouisiana, but directed that a new election should be held, so that the reign of anarchy might be putent Grant admitted that the late election in Louisiana was a gigantic fraud. He yielded to the Sennvenient time for calling on the citizens of Louisiana to exercise their right. All parties bein[2 more...]
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
A Negro, named Pinchback, known familiarly as Pinch, offered his services to Kellogg-at a price. This Pinch, a bustling fellow, had been a steward on board a steamboat, and afterwards an usher in a gambling den; but, like others of his tribe, he found that politics paid him better than washing basins, keeping doors, and dodging the police. As senator for a Negro district he happened to have served some weeks in office as successor to Lieutenant-governor Dunn. His time was up; but in America titles cling to men for life. Once a professor always a professor; once a Lieutenant-governor always a Lieutenant-governor. Though lost to office, Pinch had still a handle to his name. This man seemed worth his salt, and Kellogg came to terms with him. Pinch was to upset Warmoth. If he succeeded, he was to be Acting Governor for a few days, to have a large sum of money, and, if Norton could be set aside, to go as senator to Washington. These terms being settled, Billings led Pinch
deposition. Ten minutes more sufficed to get these articles read and passed. The Federal troops were handy, under Packard's orders, so that things were done as easily as they were said. Pinch assumed the rank of Acting Governor, took possession of the State House, seized the Great Seal of Louisiana, and proclaimed his advent to the world. Seldom in either history or fiction have grotesqueness and absurdity been carried to such lengths. We sigh over the doings of Bocking, the tailor of Leyden, as a pitiful illustration of human folly. We laugh at the impudence of Sancho, as a pleasant creation of satiric art. But Minster and Barrataria must look to their bays. If Bocking has no rival, and Sancho no superior, Pinchback and Antoine in high places have an air of burlesque not easily surpassed. Warmoth refused to recognise Pinchback, and Pinchback was puzzled how to act even though he had Packard and a guard of honour in his ante-room. A duellist, who shoots his man as coolly a
Chapter 2: reign of anarchy. On Monday morning, Packard, having the Republican writs in his hand, the Federal soldiers at his back, arrived at the Mechanics' Institute, in which edifice the Assembly was to meet. Caesar C. Antoine, holding Durell's order, stood at the door, pointing out who should enter and who should not enter. None but his friends were passed. Once in the legislative hall, these lost no time in prate, for Durell's order would expire on Wednesday, and many things had toDurell's order would expire on Wednesday, and many things had to be done before the Conservative members took their seats. The first thing was to depose Governor Warmoth and obtain possession of his official lists. But how was the lawful governor to be displaced? A Negro, named Pinchback, known familiarly as Pinch, offered his services to Kellogg-at a price. This Pinch, a bustling fellow, had been a steward on board a steamboat, and afterwards an usher in a gambling den; but, like others of his tribe, he found that politics paid him better than wash
ow was the lawful governor to be displaced? A Negro, named Pinchback, known familiarly as Pinch, offered his services to Kellogg-at a price. This Pinch, a bustling fellow, had been a steward on board a steamboat, and afterwards an usher in a gambling den; but, like others of his tribe, he found that politics paid him better than washing basins, keeping doors, and dodging the police. As senator for a Negro district he happened to have served some weeks in office as successor to Lieutenant-governor Dunn. His time was up; but in America titles cling to men for life. Once a professor always a professor; once a Lieutenant-governor always a Lieutenant-governor. Though lost to office, Pinch had still a handle to his name. This man seemed worth his salt, and Kellogg came to terms with him. Pinch was to upset Warmoth. If he succeeded, he was to be Acting Governor for a few days, to have a large sum of money, and, if Norton could be set aside, to go as senator to Washington. Thes
vernor Warmoth was deposed. Refusing to recognize this decree, Warmoth appealed to the judges of Louisiana, who decided that Elmore's proceedings were irregular, and his decree of no effect. Elmore would not cancel his decision, and the judges of Louisiana cited him for contempt of court. He only jeered. Like Pinch, he had a Federal army at his back. Through all these usurpations General Emory stood by the nominees of President Grant. For four or five weeks Pinch ruled the State, as Jacques rules his duchy in the Honeymoon. Jesters squibbed him as King Pinch, His Nigger Majesty, Lord Paper Collar, and Marquis of Pomade. They sent him false despatches, and printed comic ukases in his name. At length, his reign was over, and he handed the State House and the Great Seal to Kellogg; taking as his price the title of Governor, the Senatorship in Washington, and all the openings and emoluments of that chair. Pinchback's entry in the Senate, where he claimed a seat among the Sh
Pinchback (search for this): chapter 2
governor to be displaced? A Negro, named Pinchback, known familiarly as Pinch, offered his servocking has no rival, and Sancho no superior, Pinchback and Antoine in high places have an air of bu Warmoth refused to recognise Pinchback, and Pinchback was puzzled how to act even though he had Pasident in some way indicate recognition, Governor Pinchback and Legislature would settle everything.ate-colourably indicate — recognition of Governor Pinchback, then-all will be well. George H. Wilt from Washington to New Orleans :-- Acting Governor Pinchback, New Orleans. Department of Jushe Cabinet, Governor Warmoth was deposed and Pinchback was intailed in office by the Federal officehe openings and emoluments of that chair. Pinchback's entry in the Senate, where he claimed a seLouisiana had been improperly used; and that Pinchback had no claim to sit in Congress. A debateas not the lawful Governor of Louisiana, and Pinchback not the lawful Senator for Louisiana, but di[2 more...]
Stephen B. Packard (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 2: reign of anarchy. On Monday morning, Packard, having the Republican writs in his hand, the Federal soldiers at his back, arrse articles read and passed. The Federal troops were handy, under Packard's orders, so that things were done as easily as they were said. PPinchback, and Pinchback was puzzled how to act even though he had Packard and a guard of honour in his ante-room. A duellist, who shoots hi cover his illegal acts. Yet Warmoth stood unmoved. Pinch ran to Packard for advice, but Packard was afraid to speak. Every lawyer in New Packard was afraid to speak. Every lawyer in New Orleans told him the warrants he was executing were illegal. No one in authority recognised Pinch; and Packard, brazen as he was, declined tPackard, brazen as he was, declined to stir one step unless supported by a message from the White House. Unable to move without Pinch, as Pinch was unable to move without PackPackard, Kellogg threw himself on his patron, President Grant, and wired this message to Attorney General Williams:-- New Orleans: Dec. 11,
ogg came to terms with him. Pinch was to upset Warmoth. If he succeeded, he was to be Acting Governor for a few days, to have a large sum of money, and, if Norton could be set aside, to go as senator to Washington. These terms being settled, Billings led Pinch into the Senate Chamber, and, by help of Caesar C. Antoine, seated him as Lieutenant-governor in the chair of state. In ten minutes Pinch organized a house. Then he produced a paper, written out by Billings, charging Governor WarmothBillings, charging Governor Warmoth with certain offences, and asking for his deposition. Ten minutes more sufficed to get these articles read and passed. The Federal troops were handy, under Packard's orders, so that things were done as easily as they were said. Pinch assumed the rank of Acting Governor, took possession of the State House, seized the Great Seal of Louisiana, and proclaimed his advent to the world. Seldom in either history or fiction have grotesqueness and absurdity been carried to such lengths. We sigh ove
was a contempt of court; yet Elmore read the articles, and, without hearing the accused, declared that Governor Warmoth was deposed. Refusing to recognize this decree, Warmoth appealed to the judges of Louisiana, who decided that Elmore's proceedings were irregular, and his decree of no effect. Elmore would not cancel his decision, and the judges of Louisiana cited him for contempt of court. He only jeered. Like Pinch, he had a Federal army at his back. Through all these usurpations General Emory stood by the nominees of President Grant. For four or five weeks Pinch ruled the State, as Jacques rules his duchy in the Honeymoon. Jesters squibbed him as King Pinch, His Nigger Majesty, Lord Paper Collar, and Marquis of Pomade. They sent him false despatches, and printed comic ukases in his name. At length, his reign was over, and he handed the State House and the Great Seal to Kellogg; taking as his price the title of Governor, the Senatorship in Washington, and all the openin
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