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Browsing named entities in a specific section of L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. Search the whole document.

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bel desertion. After the recent advance of our army upon Bragg at Tullahoma, and his retreat, the Pioneer Brigade pushed on to Elk river to repair a bridge. While one of its men, a private, was bathing in the river, five of Bragg's soldiers, guns in hand, came to the bank and took aim at the swimmer, one of them shouting: Come in here, you — Yank, out of the wet! The Federal was quite sure that he was done for, and at once obeyed the order. After dressing himself, he was thus accosted: You surrender, our prisoner, do you? Yes; of course I do. That's kind. Now we'll surrender to you! And the five stacked arms before him, their spokesman adding- We've done with 'em, and have said to old Bragg, good-by! Secesh is played out. Now you surround us and take us into your camp. This was done accordingly, and is but one of hundreds of instances of wholesale desertion coming to the knowledge of our officers during two months-July and August — in Lower Tenness
June 10th, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 1.13
Cushman, the celebrated Union spy and scout of the Army of the Cumberland. Among the wild and dashing exploits which have signalized the recent war-rivalling in heroic and dramatic interest the most famous achievements of the earlier days of chivalry-few are more striking or picturesque than the simple narrative of facts which we are about to relate. Miss Pauline Cushman, or Major Cushman, as she is, by right, most generally called, was born in the city of New Orleans, on the 10th day of June, 1833, her father being a Spaniard, a native of Madrid, and a prosperous merchant of the Crescent city, and her mother a French woman of excellent social position and attainments. In course of time, her father met with losses which followed one another in rapid succession, and unable to stay the tide of adversity, after a brave but unavailing struggle, he abandoned his enterprises in New Orleans, and removed with his family to Grand Rapids, Michigan. This town was at that time little mor
March, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.13
e face and figure, at once proposed that she should enter into an engagement with him, and appear at his theatre. She accepted the proposition, and, in due time, made her debut upon the boards of the Varieties, inspiring in the hearts of the impressible people of New Orleans an admiration which partook of the nature of a furor. Gifted with rare natural gifts of mind and body, she soon became widely known as one of the first of American actresses. It was not, however, until the spring of March, 1863, that Miss Cushman exchanged the role of the actress for the real acting of a noble and patriot woman, risking her life in solemn and terrible earnestness for her country's good. She was, at that time, playing at Mozart Hall, or Wood's theatre, in Louisville, Ky., then the headquarters of the rebel sympathizers of the southwest; and, although under Union rule, these gentry had become so emboldened, from long continued success, as to almost set the Federal authorities at defiance. At t
J. R. Allen (search for this): chapter 1.13
gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman. She is a good looking woman, and anfor one minute. Her woman's face prevailed, he let her pass, and she took pains to stay within the car. When the officer of the guard came around to inspect the passes, she had a made up story all ready, at the same time showing her order from Mr. Allen to report herself immediately at his theatre. He hesitated, but her pleasing face and a few womanly tears carried the point, and our heroine was soon on her way to Nashville, at that time the base of operations of the glorious Army of the Sou
P. A. Blackman (search for this): chapter 1.13
detection-and, in due time, answered the summons of the breakfast bell, as rosy and fresh-faced, and as innocent in look and manner, as if the night had been spent comfortably in her bed. After several stirring adventures at Tullahoma, where she made a short stay, she returned to Columbia, where she remained awhile, engaged in picking up all the in. formation which it was possible to secure. Here, too, she met her friends (and lovers too, if truth were spoken), Major Boone, and Captain P. A. Blackman, rebel quartermaster, the latter of whom urged her to adopt man's apparel and join the Confederate army, with the promise of a position as his aide-de-camp, and the rank of lieutenant. This flattering proposition was accepted-the enamored captain forthwith ordered a complete rebel officer's uniform, and it was agreed that so soon as she should return from her proposed trip to Nashville, she should accompany him as aide. Meanwhile, she was not slow to accept every invitation from him
J. H. Blincoe (search for this): chapter 1.13
ying at Mozart Hall, or Wood's theatre, in Louisville, Ky., then the headquarters of the rebel sympathizers of the southwest; and, although under Union rule, these gentry had become so emboldened, from long continued success, as to almost set the Federal authorities at defiance. At the house where Miss Cushman boarded, she was unavoidably thrown into the company of many of these disloyal persons; and among her acquaintances she numbered two paroled rebel officers, Colonel Spear, and Captain J. H. Blincoe, whom, apart from all political considerations, she had admitted to a certain degree of friendship. She was at that time acting the part of Plutella, in the Seven sisters, and every one who has seen this widely popular play, will remember that Plutella has to assume, during the course of the piece, many characters-at one time a dashing Zouave officer, at another, a fine gentleman of fashion, and in this last character is supposed to drink wine with a friend. One afternoon, while r
nager of the Richmond theatre, which of course tallied exactly with her scheme. Her next move was to get acquainted with the young engineer officer, which was soon effected by a letter of safeguard given her by one of her Shelbyville friends, Major Boone; and soon, with her pretty woman's ways, she had won his entire confidence so completely, that he even offered to give her letters of introduction to General Bragg. Calling upon him at his office, she was warmly welcomed, and finally excusing Tullahoma, where she made a short stay, she returned to Columbia, where she remained awhile, engaged in picking up all the in. formation which it was possible to secure. Here, too, she met her friends (and lovers too, if truth were spoken), Major Boone, and Captain P. A. Blackman, rebel quartermaster, the latter of whom urged her to adopt man's apparel and join the Confederate army, with the promise of a position as his aide-de-camp, and the rank of lieutenant. This flattering proposition w
xecuting their errand, and it was arranged that she should report at headquarters at ten o'clock the next morning. There she was welcomed in the private office in the kindest manner, and earnestly thanked by Colonel Moore, and his superior, General Boyle, for the capital manner in which she had carried out the pseudo-treasonable plan. She was now enlightened as to the design of the United States officers, who informed her that she must enter the secret service of the government. They also advised her to moderate her secesh proclivities in public, as if she had received a severe reprimand from General Boyle; but, in private, to abuse the government, and say all the harm she could about it; by which means she would inspire confidence among the disaffected, and would be of incalculable use to the national cause. Promising a ready and strict compliance with these requests, she returned to her lodgings, where she found a note awaiting her from the management of the theatre, dischargi
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 1.13
ed of her, was to secretly visit the rebel General Bragg's headquarters, an enterprise at that time whence she found, much to her annoyance, that Bragg had removed his headquarters-and where she couase could be reported to and acted upon by General Bragg. Moreover, she was not allowed to return ing examination, sent her, under guard, to General Bragg. On arriving at Shelbyville, she was show and whiskers, and bronzed face. This was General Bragg. His manner was stern, but gentlemanly, aTruesdail. And why were you sent? inquired Bragg, with a sly look of incredulity. Because I Why wouldn't you take the oath? persisted Bragg, apparently untouched by her youth and beauty hanged, replied the general, dryly. Leaving Bragg, she was taken before Colonel McKinstry and th, a private, was bathing in the river, five of Bragg's soldiers, guns in hand, came to the bank and- We've done with 'em, and have said to old Bragg, good-by! Secesh is played out. Now you surro[2 more...]
til she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman.
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