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George N. Sanders (search for this): chapter 1.13
tection of her landlady in the act of mixing up poison in the coffee of a number of sick and wounded Union soldiers, who had been quartered upon her. She managed to play the sympathizer until she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theat
place, and gave him a ten dollar greenback if he would, at a proper time of night, run up the road a piece, and then back again, shouting as loud as he could, the Yankees are coming! The old negro entered heartily into the plan, and carried it out successfully At the darkest hour of the stormy night, the whole negro quarters poured into the house where the guards and their prisoner were sleeping, and the Yanks! the Yanks am a-coming! resounded from a dozen thoroughly frightened throats. Sauve qui peut, was the word, the rebels fled incontinently, and our heroine, flinging herself upon her horse, sped away on the road to Franklin. She had provided herself, somehow, with a pistol belonging to a wounded rebel soldier in a house where she had stopped; and pushing her way fearlessly along she reached and passed, with peculiar adroitness, five rebel pickets, but was finally foiled and obliged to turn back before the unswervable honesty of the last picket on the road, who would not al
was, at that time, playing at Mozart Hall, or Wood's theatre, in Louisville, Ky., then the headquarters of the rebel sympathizers of the southwest; and, although under Union rule, these gentry had become so emboldened, from long continued success, as to almost set the Federal authorities at defiance. At the house where Miss Cushman boarded, she was unavoidably thrown into the company of many of these disloyal persons; and among her acquaintances she numbered two paroled rebel officers, Colonel Spear, and Captain J. H. Blincoe, whom, apart from all political considerations, she had admitted to a certain degree of friendship. She was at that time acting the part of Plutella, in the Seven sisters, and every one who has seen this widely popular play, will remember that Plutella has to assume, during the course of the piece, many characters-at one time a dashing Zouave officer, at another, a fine gentleman of fashion, and in this last character is supposed to drink wine with a friend.
son in the coffee of a number of sick and wounded Union soldiers, who had been quartered upon her. She managed to play the sympathizer until she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engag
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
a light demeanor and admitted that she made the sketches. She stoutly asserted, however, with a laugh, that they were mere fancy sketches, gotten up with the idea of stuffing the Yankees when she should find herself among them, so that she should be permitted to recover her theatrical wardrobe. The colonel, although surprised at her consummate and audacious acting, wag too old a bird to be caught in that way, and remanded her to custody. She was taken to the house of a Mr. Morgan, near Duck river, where she was carefully guarded in a room fitted up as a dungeon, with barred windows and doubly fastened doors. Hers was now a truly distressing and apparently hopeless case. Under the long protracted suspense as to her ultimate fate, added to the great privations and fatigues which she had previously gone through, she fell seriously ill; and the discomforts of her situation-sick and helpless, surrounded by foes and strangers-can hardly be described by tongue or pen. Long, weary days s
Pond Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
Miss Cushman, he detailed her guard to another special duty, and took her under his own care and watch, and she enjoyed his gallant attentions until they reached Hillsboro, where she was handed over to another scout to be taken to General Forrest's headquarters. During the long ride which ensued she concocted another nice littleers the next morning by the unwelcome appearance of four of the rebel scouts from whom she had escaped the night before, and who had tracked her all the way from Hillsboro. Although she pretended to be glad to see them and explained her separation from them as the result of her fears of the Yanks, they were neither gulled nor mollght of these tell-tale documents which she had placed in the soles of her gaiters, and which had been purloined from her satchel, left in the hurried flight from Hillsboro, she yet assumed a light demeanor and admitted that she made the sketches. She stoutly asserted, however, with a laugh, that they were mere fancy sketches, gott
Manchester, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
forded a very clever ostensible reason for her travelling from headquarters to headquarters, and from place to place through the South. She was then instructed to make no confidants; not to talk too much; to make the same answers to all parties, and never to deviate from the story, when once framed. The search for her brother was to be the free and confessed object of her travels, and under this pretence she was to visit the rebel armies at Columbia, Shelbyville, Wartrace, Tullahoma, and Manchester. She was to make no direct inquiries of officers or others concerning the strength of the Confederate forces, movements, supplies, etc., but, in accepting the offers to ride and other attention which her personal attractions would probably secure her from officers, she was to keep her eyes open, and note every thing of importance which she might see. In the hospitals, she was to make such observations as she could, concerning the medical and hospital supplies, the number of sick and woun
Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
was to visit the rebel armies at Columbia, Shelbyville, Wartrace, Tullahoma, and Manchester. She ree days, the re-opening of the railroad to Shelbyville, which had been destroyed by the Union trooacquaintance while there. Soon she went to Shelbyville, from whence she found, much to her annoyanstration of her original object in visiting Shelbyville. It chanced that she learned that at the sngs, plans, etc., of fortifications; and at Shelbyville and Tullahoma she made careful and accuratede, of various fortifications at Tullahoma, Shelbyville, Spring Hill, etc. Staggered almost to fainet afford relief to her. She well knew that Shelbyville, where she then was, was the objective poin, began to show evident signs of evacuating Shelbyville. Finally it was decided by a council of watside the town: then followed the battle of Shelbyville, and ere long the streets of that town echo of her new friends could suggest, she left Shelbyville en route to Murfreesboro. There a day and [3 more...]
Spring Hill (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
f the Confederate uniform found among her effects when captured. To this she answered frankly, although, to her annoyance, it caused the instant issue of an order for the arrest of the gallant captain who had procured it for her. But, finally, the colonel produced from his desk the plans, maps, and documents which she had abstracted from the rebel engineer's table at Columbus, together with the sketches and memoranda that she had made, of various fortifications at Tullahoma, Shelbyville, Spring Hill, etc. Staggered almost to faintness by the sight of these tell-tale documents which she had placed in the soles of her gaiters, and which had been purloined from her satchel, left in the hurried flight from Hillsboro, she yet assumed a light demeanor and admitted that she made the sketches. She stoutly asserted, however, with a laugh, that they were mere fancy sketches, gotten up with the idea of stuffing the Yankees when she should find herself among them, so that she should be permitte
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
and under this pretence she was to visit the rebel armies at Columbia, Shelbyville, Wartrace, Tullahoma, and Manchester. She was to make no direct inquiries of officers or others concerning the stras if the night had been spent comfortably in her bed. After several stirring adventures at Tullahoma, where she made a short stay, she returned to Columbia, where she remained awhile, engaged in litary superiors, not to make drawings, plans, etc., of fortifications; and at Shelbyville and Tullahoma she made careful and accurate drawings, which she concealed between the inner and outer soles mbus, together with the sketches and memoranda that she had made, of various fortifications at Tullahoma, Shelbyville, Spring Hill, etc. Staggered almost to faintness by the sight of these tell-tale Amusing instance of rebel desertion. After the recent advance of our army upon Bragg at Tullahoma, and his retreat, the Pioneer Brigade pushed on to Elk river to repair a bridge. While one of
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