hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 219 1 Browse Search
Charles Zagonyi 118 2 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 107 1 Browse Search
Sheridan 105 7 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 98 0 Browse Search
John F. Porter 72 6 Browse Search
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) 67 1 Browse Search
Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) 66 0 Browse Search
Robinson 62 0 Browse Search
Harry Newcomer 60 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. Search the whole document.

Found 288 total hits in 54 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
hom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman. She is a good looking woman, and an accomplished actress, but she will talk secesh. If you can only keep her
er return journey to that city. On her arrival there, she was waited upon by the most distinguished generals of the army, and by others less prominent-all of whom, however, were united in treating her with a delicate and even affectionate courtesy, which left her no comfort to be desired but the boon of absolute health. As a deserved and appropriate acknowledgment of the great services which this brave girl had rendered the Union cause, she was, through the efforts of Generals Granger and Garfield, honored with the commission and rank of a major of cavalry, with full and special permission to wear the equipment and insignia of her new rank. The ladies of Nashville, hearing of her promotion, and deeply sensible of the honor thus conferred upon one of their own sex, prepared a costly riding-habit, trimmed in military style, with dainty shoulder-straps, and presented the dress to the gallant major with all the customary honors. Amusing instance of rebel desertion. After the rece
xecuting their errand, and it was arranged that she should report at headquarters at ten o'clock the next morning. There she was welcomed in the private office in the kindest manner, and earnestly thanked by Colonel Moore, and his superior, General Boyle, for the capital manner in which she had carried out the pseudo-treasonable plan. She was now enlightened as to the design of the United States officers, who informed her that she must enter the secret service of the government. They also advised her to moderate her secesh proclivities in public, as if she had received a severe reprimand from General Boyle; but, in private, to abuse the government, and say all the harm she could about it; by which means she would inspire confidence among the disaffected, and would be of incalculable use to the national cause. Promising a ready and strict compliance with these requests, she returned to her lodgings, where she found a note awaiting her from the management of the theatre, dischargi
nsferred to Anderson's Mill, where she was disarmed and examined by the officer in charge. Finding that she had no pass, she was held as a prisoner of war, until her case could be reported to and acted upon by General Bragg. Moreover, she was not allowed to return to the house at Big Harpeth where she had left a satchel containing her rebel uniform and several articles of pressing use and value. Fortunately she had come across her horse on the road to Anderson's Mill, at the house of one De Moss, and claiming him at once, had taken possession of him, and as night closed in, she found herself again on the road, still a prisoner. About noon the next day, her guide stopped with her for refreshment at the house of a well-known physician, and while there, a large body of Confederate cavalry passed, under command of the famous General Morgan. His attention being called to Miss Cushman, he detailed her guard to another special duty, and took her under his own care and watch, and she en
P. A. Blackman (search for this): chapter 1.13
detection-and, in due time, answered the summons of the breakfast bell, as rosy and fresh-faced, and as innocent in look and manner, as if the night had been spent comfortably in her bed. After several stirring adventures at Tullahoma, where she made a short stay, she returned to Columbia, where she remained awhile, engaged in picking up all the in. formation which it was possible to secure. Here, too, she met her friends (and lovers too, if truth were spoken), Major Boone, and Captain P. A. Blackman, rebel quartermaster, the latter of whom urged her to adopt man's apparel and join the Confederate army, with the promise of a position as his aide-de-camp, and the rank of lieutenant. This flattering proposition was accepted-the enamored captain forthwith ordered a complete rebel officer's uniform, and it was agreed that so soon as she should return from her proposed trip to Nashville, she should accompany him as aide. Meanwhile, she was not slow to accept every invitation from him
s to be had for love or money. Every rebel sympathizer in town had heard of it, and all were there. The time approached for the play to begin. The musicians in the orchestra tuned their big fiddles in their usual mysterious manner. Ushers began to call out the numbers of seats, and to slam the doors in their wonted style. The call-boy flew here and there, and at last, in obedience to the prompter's bell, the curtain began to rise, discovering Mr. Pluto at breakfast, within the shades of Hades. There was, however, a veritable Pluto to burst upon them, that they wot not of. This was coming. In the meantime, the jokes and mirth of the Seven sisters were more than ordinarily relished. It may have been that those in the secret were so delighted at the prospect of seeing the Federal authorities thus wantonly insulted, that they greeted every thing with rapture, and that this became contagious among the good Union people of the house, who .f course, were ignorant of the joke. At le
nager of the Richmond theatre, which of course tallied exactly with her scheme. Her next move was to get acquainted with the young engineer officer, which was soon effected by a letter of safeguard given her by one of her Shelbyville friends, Major Boone; and soon, with her pretty woman's ways, she had won his entire confidence so completely, that he even offered to give her letters of introduction to General Bragg. Calling upon him at his office, she was warmly welcomed, and finally excusing Tullahoma, where she made a short stay, she returned to Columbia, where she remained awhile, engaged in picking up all the in. formation which it was possible to secure. Here, too, she met her friends (and lovers too, if truth were spoken), Major Boone, and Captain P. A. Blackman, rebel quartermaster, the latter of whom urged her to adopt man's apparel and join the Confederate army, with the promise of a position as his aide-de-camp, and the rank of lieutenant. This flattering proposition w
place, and gave him a ten dollar greenback if he would, at a proper time of night, run up the road a piece, and then back again, shouting as loud as he could, the Yankees are coming! The old negro entered heartily into the plan, and carried it out successfully At the darkest hour of the stormy night, the whole negro quarters poured into the house where the guards and their prisoner were sleeping, and the Yanks! the Yanks am a-coming! resounded from a dozen thoroughly frightened throats. Sauve qui peut, was the word, the rebels fled incontinently, and our heroine, flinging herself upon her horse, sped away on the road to Franklin. She had provided herself, somehow, with a pistol belonging to a wounded rebel soldier in a house where she had stopped; and pushing her way fearlessly along she reached and passed, with peculiar adroitness, five rebel pickets, but was finally foiled and obliged to turn back before the unswervable honesty of the last picket on the road, who would not al
was, at that time, playing at Mozart Hall, or Wood's theatre, in Louisville, Ky., then the headquarters of the rebel sympathizers of the southwest; and, although under Union rule, these gentry had become so emboldened, from long continued success, as to almost set the Federal authorities at defiance. At the house where Miss Cushman boarded, she was unavoidably thrown into the company of many of these disloyal persons; and among her acquaintances she numbered two paroled rebel officers, Colonel Spear, and Captain J. H. Blincoe, whom, apart from all political considerations, she had admitted to a certain degree of friendship. She was at that time acting the part of Plutella, in the Seven sisters, and every one who has seen this widely popular play, will remember that Plutella has to assume, during the course of the piece, many characters-at one time a dashing Zouave officer, at another, a fine gentleman of fashion, and in this last character is supposed to drink wine with a friend.
itary style, with dainty shoulder-straps, and presented the dress to the gallant major with all the customary honors. Amusing instance of rebel desertion. After the recent advance of our army upon Bragg at Tullahoma, and his retreat, the Pioneer Brigade pushed on to Elk river to repair a bridge. While one of its men, a private, was bathing in the river, five of Bragg's soldiers, guns in hand, came to the bank and took aim at the swimmer, one of them shouting: Come in here, you — Yank, out of the wet! The Federal was quite sure that he was done for, and at once obeyed the order. After dressing himself, he was thus accosted: You surrender, our prisoner, do you? Yes; of course I do. That's kind. Now we'll surrender to you! And the five stacked arms before him, their spokesman adding- We've done with 'em, and have said to old Bragg, good-by! Secesh is played out. Now you surround us and take us into your camp. This was done accordingly, and is but one
1 2 3 4 5 6