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called to Miss Cushman, he detailed her guard to another special duty, and took her under his own care and watch, and she enjoyed his gallant attentions until they reached Hillsboro, where she was handed over to another scout to be taken to General Forrest's headquarters. During the long ride which ensued she concocted another nice little scheme for escape. Knowing that General Rosecrans was much dreaded by the rebels in that part of the country, who hardly knew where they might next expecs in the saddle, and proceeding on her journey, under the care of her scouts, who evinced more than usual watchfulness over her. She was first taken to General Morgan, who received her with his wonted courteousness, and he accompanied her to General Forrest's headquarters. That celebrated chief, after a trying examination, sent her, under guard, to General Bragg. On arriving at Shelbyville, she was shown at once to the general's headquarters, which were in the heart of the camp. On entering
ss Cushman, I have to tell you plainly, that there are very serious charges against you, and I must give you into the custody of our provost-marshal-general, Colonel McKinstry, who is, however, a very just and humane man, and who will treat you kindly. Your subsequent fate will depend entirely upon the result of our investigation. Colonel McKinstry is, then, precisely the man I desire to see.; for through him will the proofs of my guiltlessness of these charges appear, rejoined Miss Cushman, boldly, and if they are proved false, how then, general? You will be acquitted with honor, replied he. How, though, if I am found guilty? You know the penalty inflicted upon convicted spies. If found guilty, you will be hanged, replied the general, dryly. Leaving Bragg, she was taken before Colonel McKinstry and there subjected to another strict examination, in which she was interrogated concerning the manner in which she became possessed of the Confederate uniform found among her
was gradually recovering from his faintness, the brave fellow, true to instructions, designated the farmer's boy, as the one who had shot him, because he was a Yankee. It now became evident to the rebs that each party had mistaken the other for Yanks ; but for further precaution, Pauline was ordered to accompany them, and the wounded soldier was placed on a horse, and the party took up their march to Wartrace. This was a programme not at all agreeable to her, and as they rode along through tce of four of the rebel scouts from whom she had escaped the night before, and who had tracked her all the way from Hillsboro. Although she pretended to be glad to see them and explained her separation from them as the result of her fears of the Yanks, they were neither gulled nor mollified, but gruffly ordered her to accompany them back, without even taking the breakfast which her kind hostess pressed upon them. And soon she was in the saddle, and proceeding on her journey, under the care of
eriously ill; and the discomforts of her situation-sick and helpless, surrounded by foes and strangers-can hardly be described by tongue or pen. Long, weary days she lay thus, at the very verge of death — the court-martial which had been appointed to investigate her case had not yet been able to agree upon a verdict, and imagination added its horrors to the dread reality of her situation. Ten days thus passed, with the dread of death in its most ignominious form, hanging, like the sword of Damocles, ever above her head. Finally, Captain Pedden brought to her the unwelcome news which he tenderly broke to her, that she had been found guilty and that she was condemned to be hanged as a spy. The situation of our heroine, mental and physical, was now deplorable in the extreme. Condemned to death upon the gallows, surrounded by foes, with her fate unknown, even to her friends, hers was indeed a position to shake the hearts of the strongest and firmest. Yet there was a small ray of hop
Gordon Granger (search for this): chapter 1.13
ious strength which excitement had lent her gave way to weakness, and she sank to the floor, overcome by joy and happiness. Ere the close of that happy day, Generals Granger and Mitchell called upon her and expressed the liveliest interest in her situation; the brave soldiers heard of the noble woman whom they had thus opportunel she left Shelbyville en route to Murfreesboro. There a day and a night's rest enabled her to take the cars to Nashville; and under the care of an officer of General Granger's staff, who had himself done her the honor of attending her thus far, she began her return journey to that city. On her arrival there, she was waited upon balth. As a deserved and appropriate acknowledgment of the great services which this brave girl had rendered the Union cause, she was, through the efforts of Generals Granger and Garfield, honored with the commission and rank of a major of cavalry, with full and special permission to wear the equipment and insignia of her new rank
uation-sick and helpless, surrounded by foes and strangers-can hardly be described by tongue or pen. Long, weary days she lay thus, at the very verge of death — the court-martial which had been appointed to investigate her case had not yet been able to agree upon a verdict, and imagination added its horrors to the dread reality of her situation. Ten days thus passed, with the dread of death in its most ignominious form, hanging, like the sword of Damocles, ever above her head. Finally, Captain Pedden brought to her the unwelcome news which he tenderly broke to her, that she had been found guilty and that she was condemned to be hanged as a spy. The situation of our heroine, mental and physical, was now deplorable in the extreme. Condemned to death upon the gallows, surrounded by foes, with her fate unknown, even to her friends, hers was indeed a position to shake the hearts of the strongest and firmest. Yet there was a small ray of hope that illumined the darkness of this dismal
til she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman.
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.13
It may have been that those in the secret were so delighted at the prospect of seeing the Federal authorities thus wantonly insulted, that they greeted every thing with rapture, and that this became contagious among the good Union people of the house, who .f course, were ignorant of the joke. At length the critical moment arrived, and advancing in her theatrical costume to the foot lights, our heroine, goblet in hand, gave, in a clear, ringing voice, the following toast: Here's to Jeff. Davis and the Southern Confederacy. May the South always maintain her honor and her rights! Miss Cushman had prepared herself for a fearful outbreak of popular opinion, but for a moment even the hearts of the audience seemed to stop beating. Then, however, it burst forth, and such a scene followed as beggars description. The good Union portion of the audience had set, at first, spell-bound and horrified by the fearful treason thus outspoken, while the secesh were frozen with the audacity
the sympathizer until she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to sec
J. H. Blincoe (search for this): chapter 1.13
ying at Mozart Hall, or Wood's theatre, in Louisville, Ky., then the headquarters of the rebel sympathizers of the southwest; and, although under Union rule, these gentry had become so emboldened, from long continued success, as to almost set the Federal authorities at defiance. At the house where Miss Cushman boarded, she was unavoidably thrown into the company of many of these disloyal persons; and among her acquaintances she numbered two paroled rebel officers, Colonel Spear, and Captain J. H. Blincoe, whom, apart from all political considerations, she had admitted to a certain degree of friendship. She was at that time acting the part of Plutella, in the Seven sisters, and every one who has seen this widely popular play, will remember that Plutella has to assume, during the course of the piece, many characters-at one time a dashing Zouave officer, at another, a fine gentleman of fashion, and in this last character is supposed to drink wine with a friend. One afternoon, while r
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