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Browsing named entities in a specific section of L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. Search the whole document.

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A. A. Cushman (search for this): chapter 1.13
ed another, i. e., that she had a brother, A. A. Cushman, who was a colonel somewhere in the rebel human habitation, the carriage stopped, and Miss Cushman found awaiting her a fine bay horse, fully he story of the cruel treatment received by Miss Cushman from the Federal authorities of Nashville, write the promised letters of introduction, Miss Cushman found herself alone in the room with the mu, and let himself fall off his horse, while Miss Cushman gave the animal a sharp blow which sent hime new officer. It may here be noticed that Miss Cushman now departed from the strict instructions weral Morgan. His attention being called to Miss Cushman, he detailed her guard to another special dan: Of what country are you a native, Miss Cushman? he asked, waving her to a chair with his ed Pauline, proudly. By whom, may I ask, Miss Cushman? By the Federal Colonel, Truesdail. And her, resumed in a more kindly tone: Miss Cushman, this statement of yours may be all correct[3 more...]
Thomas Placide (search for this): chapter 1.13
ife to be found there. Exaggerated by distance, and by her own bright imagination, which pictured all things couleur de rose, these glowing descriptions awakened in Pauline's breast the most intense desire to see and participate in their realities. And, ere long, we find her in New York, waiting for an opportunity to take her first step in the real life of which, on the far off prairies, she had so often dreamed. The opportunity was nearer than she thought, for soon she fell in with Mr. Thomas Placide, manager of the New Orleans Varieties, who, struck by her handsome face and figure, at once proposed that she should enter into an engagement with him, and appear at his theatre. She accepted the proposition, and, in due time, made her debut upon the boards of the Varieties, inspiring in the hearts of the impressible people of New Orleans an admiration which partook of the nature of a furor. Gifted with rare natural gifts of mind and body, she soon became widely known as one of the f
g her life in solemn and terrible earnestness for her country's good. She was, at that time, playing at Mozart Hall, or Wood's theatre, in Louisville, Ky., then the headquarters of the rebel sympathizers of the southwest; and, although under Union a most virulent secessionist. Before she had left the theatre, the guards arrived to arrest her; but-out of respect to Mr. Wood, the proprietor of the theatre — they were deterred from actually executing their errand, and it was arranged that she new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman. She is a good looking woman, and an accomplished act can only keep her out of the provost-marshal's hands, you will make a good thing, for she will be popular at once, said Mr. Wood. So the proposition was made to Pauline, and, after advising with the military authorities, under whose guidance she wa
gly, the sympathies of the woman of the house having been fully enlisted by the story of the cruel treatment received by Miss Cushman from the Federal authorities of Nashville, she was allowed to spend the night there. In the morning, her host, Milam by name, who carried on a considerable business in smuggling goods and supplies out of Nashville for the benefit of his rebel friends across the river, purchased her horse and equipments, giving her confederate funds therefore and hired her a bugith but a small moiety of her baggage, some distance from her destination, and the night rapidly approaching. Indeed it was quite dark when she reached Milam's house, where she had spent the night and sold her horse before going to Columbia. Mrs. Milam, who had before been so cordial, was now evidently suspicious, and our heroine's comfort was not increased by her interview with the husband on the following morning. He informed her that her trunks which she had left at Nashville, had been se
John Morgan (search for this): chapter 1.13
ped with her for refreshment at the house of a well-known physician, and while there, a large body of Confederate cavalry passed, under command of the famous General Morgan. His attention being called to Miss Cushman, he detailed her guard to another special duty, and took her under his own care and watch, and she enjoyed his ga she was in the saddle, and proceeding on her journey, under the care of her scouts, who evinced more than usual watchfulness over her. She was first taken to General Morgan, who received her with his wonted courteousness, and he accompanied her to General Forrest's headquarters. That celebrated chief, after a trying examination,ugh surprised at her consummate and audacious acting, wag too old a bird to be caught in that way, and remanded her to custody. She was taken to the house of a Mr. Morgan, near Duck river, where she was carefully guarded in a room fitted up as a dungeon, with barred windows and doubly fastened doors. Hers was now a truly distre
ir usual mysterious manner. Ushers began to call out the numbers of seats, and to slam the doors in their wonted style. The call-boy flew here and there, and at last, in obedience to the prompter's bell, the curtain began to rise, discovering Mr. Pluto at breakfast, within the shades of Hades. There was, however, a veritable Pluto to burst upon them, that they wot not of. This was coming. In the meantime, the jokes and mirth of the Seven sisters were more than ordinarily relished. It may hPluto to burst upon them, that they wot not of. This was coming. In the meantime, the jokes and mirth of the Seven sisters were more than ordinarily relished. It may have been that those in the secret were so delighted at the prospect of seeing the Federal authorities thus wantonly insulted, that they greeted every thing with rapture, and that this became contagious among the good Union people of the house, who .f course, were ignorant of the joke. At length the critical moment arrived, and advancing in her theatrical costume to the foot lights, our heroine, goblet in hand, gave, in a clear, ringing voice, the following toast: Here's to Jeff. Davis and
George N. Sanders (search for this): chapter 1.13
tection of her landlady in the act of mixing up poison in the coffee of a number of sick and wounded Union soldiers, who had been quartered upon her. She managed to play the sympathizer until she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theat
Pauline Cushman (search for this): chapter 1.13
Pauline Cushman, the celebrated Union spy and scout of the Army of the Cumberland. Among the w facts which we are about to relate. Miss Pauline Cushman, or Major Cushman, as she is, by right,Cushman, as she is, by right, most generally called, was born in the city of New Orleans, on the 10th day of June, 1833, her fatever, until the spring of March, 1863, that Miss Cushman exchanged the role of the actress for the rways maintain her honor and her rights! Miss Cushman had prepared herself for a fearful outbreak Thrown afresh, as it were, upon the world, Miss Cushman now found herself in a most peculiar and emuisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman. She is a good looking woman, and an accomnear you in battle, and you will see that Pauline Cushman will fight as bravely and faithfully as alessness of these charges appear, rejoined Miss Cushman, boldly, and if they are proved false, how thrill of mingled hope and joy ran through Miss Cushman's veins as her friends announced to her tha[5 more...]
J. R. Allen (search for this): chapter 1.13
gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman. She is a good looking woman, and anfor one minute. Her woman's face prevailed, he let her pass, and she took pains to stay within the car. When the officer of the guard came around to inspect the passes, she had a made up story all ready, at the same time showing her order from Mr. Allen to report herself immediately at his theatre. He hesitated, but her pleasing face and a few womanly tears carried the point, and our heroine was soon on her way to Nashville, at that time the base of operations of the glorious Army of the Sou
Henry W. Moore (search for this): chapter 1.13
asked merely for a little time to think it over. The gentlemen left to prepare matters for the expected surprise; but no sooner were they fairly out of sight, than with cheeks burning and eyes flashing, the actress proceeded to the office of Colonel Moore, the United States Provost-Marshal, with whom she had a slight acquaintance, and to whom she related the whole affair. He quietly and kindly heard her story, and then, thanking her for her confidence, coolly advised her to carry out the proghey were deterred from actually executing their errand, and it was arranged that she should report at headquarters at ten o'clock the next morning. There she was welcomed in the private office in the kindest manner, and earnestly thanked by Colonel Moore, and his superior, General Boyle, for the capital manner in which she had carried out the pseudo-treasonable plan. She was now enlightened as to the design of the United States officers, who informed her that she must enter the secret servic
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