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Browsing named entities in a specific section of L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. Search the whole document.

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Spring Hill (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
f the Confederate uniform found among her effects when captured. To this she answered frankly, although, to her annoyance, it caused the instant issue of an order for the arrest of the gallant captain who had procured it for her. But, finally, the colonel produced from his desk the plans, maps, and documents which she had abstracted from the rebel engineer's table at Columbus, together with the sketches and memoranda that she had made, of various fortifications at Tullahoma, Shelbyville, Spring Hill, etc. Staggered almost to faintness by the sight of these tell-tale documents which she had placed in the soles of her gaiters, and which had been purloined from her satchel, left in the hurried flight from Hillsboro, she yet assumed a light demeanor and admitted that she made the sketches. She stoutly asserted, however, with a laugh, that they were mere fancy sketches, gotten up with the idea of stuffing the Yankees when she should find herself among them, so that she should be permitte
son in the coffee of a number of sick and wounded Union soldiers, who had been quartered upon her. She managed to play the sympathizer until she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engag
Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
was to visit the rebel armies at Columbia, Shelbyville, Wartrace, Tullahoma, and Manchester. She ree days, the re-opening of the railroad to Shelbyville, which had been destroyed by the Union trooacquaintance while there. Soon she went to Shelbyville, from whence she found, much to her annoyanstration of her original object in visiting Shelbyville. It chanced that she learned that at the sngs, plans, etc., of fortifications; and at Shelbyville and Tullahoma she made careful and accuratede, of various fortifications at Tullahoma, Shelbyville, Spring Hill, etc. Staggered almost to fainet afford relief to her. She well knew that Shelbyville, where she then was, was the objective poin, began to show evident signs of evacuating Shelbyville. Finally it was decided by a council of watside the town: then followed the battle of Shelbyville, and ere long the streets of that town echo of her new friends could suggest, she left Shelbyville en route to Murfreesboro. There a day and [3 more...]
Grand Rapids (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
born in the city of New Orleans, on the 10th day of June, 1833, her father being a Spaniard, a native of Madrid, and a prosperous merchant of the Crescent city, and her mother a French woman of excellent social position and attainments. In course of time, her father met with losses which followed one another in rapid succession, and unable to stay the tide of adversity, after a brave but unavailing struggle, he abandoned his enterprises in New Orleans, and removed with his family to Grand Rapids, Michigan. This town was at that time little more than a frontier settlement, and opening an establishment for the purposes of trade with the neighboring Indians, he soon found himself in active and successful business. Pauline, meanwhile, the only girl in a family of six brothers, had arrived at the age of ten years, and was growing in beauty and intelligence. The circumstances which surrounded her domestic life, however, somewhat clouded the joy of the young girl's earlier years. Her fat
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
y out of sight, than with cheeks burning and eyes flashing, the actress proceeded to the office of Colonel Moore, the United States Provost-Marshal, with whom she had a slight acquaintance, and to whom she related the whole affair. He quietly and ktal manner in which she had carried out the pseudo-treasonable plan. She was now enlightened as to the design of the United States officers, who informed her that she must enter the secret service of the government. They also advised her to moderaShe managed to play the sympathizer until she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman wasary as not to excite suspicion, would yet serve to refresh the memory on certain points. The Oath of Fidelity to the United States was then solemnly administered to Miss Cushman; the gallant colonel presented to her a handsome six-shooter, and on a
Pond Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
Miss Cushman, he detailed her guard to another special duty, and took her under his own care and watch, and she enjoyed his gallant attentions until they reached Hillsboro, where she was handed over to another scout to be taken to General Forrest's headquarters. During the long ride which ensued she concocted another nice littleers the next morning by the unwelcome appearance of four of the rebel scouts from whom she had escaped the night before, and who had tracked her all the way from Hillsboro. Although she pretended to be glad to see them and explained her separation from them as the result of her fears of the Yanks, they were neither gulled nor mollght of these tell-tale documents which she had placed in the soles of her gaiters, and which had been purloined from her satchel, left in the hurried flight from Hillsboro, she yet assumed a light demeanor and admitted that she made the sketches. She stoutly asserted, however, with a laugh, that they were mere fancy sketches, gott
Manchester, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
forded a very clever ostensible reason for her travelling from headquarters to headquarters, and from place to place through the South. She was then instructed to make no confidants; not to talk too much; to make the same answers to all parties, and never to deviate from the story, when once framed. The search for her brother was to be the free and confessed object of her travels, and under this pretence she was to visit the rebel armies at Columbia, Shelbyville, Wartrace, Tullahoma, and Manchester. She was to make no direct inquiries of officers or others concerning the strength of the Confederate forces, movements, supplies, etc., but, in accepting the offers to ride and other attention which her personal attractions would probably secure her from officers, she was to keep her eyes open, and note every thing of importance which she might see. In the hospitals, she was to make such observations as she could, concerning the medical and hospital supplies, the number of sick and woun
of the greatest importance, and one upon which the whole fate of the Union cause seemed to depend. First, she was to be sent out of the lines, in company with many other rebel women who were being sent South, in obedience to a late order of General Mitchell. To this very natural reason, she added another, i. e., that she had a brother, A. A. Cushman, who was a colonel somewhere in the rebel army, and a professed anxiety to find him afforded a very clever ostensible reason for her travelling frg once more waved over the town, and that she was safe, the fictitious strength which excitement had lent her gave way to weakness, and she sank to the floor, overcome by joy and happiness. Ere the close of that happy day, Generals Granger and Mitchell called upon her and expressed the liveliest interest in her situation; the brave soldiers heard of the noble woman whom they had thus opportunely saved from a terrible death, and, on every hand, she received the most tender and convincing tokens
William Truesdail (search for this): chapter 1.13
eatre was a short one; for, on her return from rehearsal one day, she found a summons from Colonel Truesdail, the chief of the army police of Nashville. On entering his office, she was received by h! At these words she involuntarily shrank back, but yet she answered in a firm tone: Colonel Truesdail, hundreds, aye, thousands of our noble soldiers, each one of greater service to our countrning. He informed her that her trunks which she had left at Nashville, had been seized by Colonel Truesdail, whereupon she made a great show of pretended indignation, declaring that she would go to sent, answered Pauline, proudly. By whom, may I ask, Miss Cushman? By the Federal Colonel, Truesdail. And why were you sent? inquired Bragg, with a sly look of incredulity. Because I gave, and went to Nashville, where I got a fresh engagement, only to be sent away in turn; for Colonel Truesdail, the chief of the Federal army police, getting wind of my Southern sentiments, and hearing
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 1.13
ed of her, was to secretly visit the rebel General Bragg's headquarters, an enterprise at that time whence she found, much to her annoyance, that Bragg had removed his headquarters-and where she couase could be reported to and acted upon by General Bragg. Moreover, she was not allowed to return ing examination, sent her, under guard, to General Bragg. On arriving at Shelbyville, she was show and whiskers, and bronzed face. This was General Bragg. His manner was stern, but gentlemanly, aTruesdail. And why were you sent? inquired Bragg, with a sly look of incredulity. Because I Why wouldn't you take the oath? persisted Bragg, apparently untouched by her youth and beauty hanged, replied the general, dryly. Leaving Bragg, she was taken before Colonel McKinstry and th, a private, was bathing in the river, five of Bragg's soldiers, guns in hand, came to the bank and- We've done with 'em, and have said to old Bragg, good-by! Secesh is played out. Now you surro[2 more...]
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