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Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
beyond our lines furnish a number also; but except in the case of the general missionaries, sent out by the parent board, we can give no guess even as to their numbers. The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to each Georgia Brigade, and at the session of 1863 the work was begun by sending seven ministers: R. B. Lester to Jackson's Brigade, Army of Tennessee; A. M. Thigpen to Colquitt's Brigade, near Charleston; J. W. Turner to the troops in and around Savannah, and on the coast below there; G. W. Yarbrough to Wofford's Brigade, General Longstreet's army; T. H. Stewart to Thomas's Brigade, and P. O. Harper to Gordon's Brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. Railroad, until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military service, and will receive his appointment to a brigade when his term expires. But, to return from this digression, I give the
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ifices to aid the needy. Reader, think of these noble men as you gather around your wellspread board, imitate their example towards the needy in your midst and reduce your rations that you may help to increase their scant fare. Happening in Lynchburg the other day I visited the Soldiers' Library, established by the efficient post chaplain (Brother J. L. Johnson), and was very much pleased with its arrangement and management. It is supplied with about eight hundred volumes of religious and Burrows is again laboring in our camp, Rev. A. Broaddus, Sr., arrived on yesterday, and I learn that Rev. Dr. Jeter (who has recently spent several weeks of very successful labor in the artillery), and Rev. H. W. Dodge (pastor of our Church in Lynchburg, and one of the brightest ornaments of the Virginia Baptist pulpit), will be on in a few days to remain some time with us. Can't you send us some of your best Georgia Baptist preachers? Brethren may think that I always harp on one string,
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
r's offering for your brave defenders. occasional. Camp near Orange Court House, January 4, 1864. camp Twenty-Sixth Virginia, General Wise's Brigade, near Charleston, S. C., January 6. It gives me great pleasure to inform you and the friends of our regiment, through the Herald, that the Lord continues to pour out His Spirit u Christ give manifest tokens of deep religious impressions. There is a Bible-class in every company of Doles's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. Charleston, South Carolina. It gives me great pleasure to report, that our meeting continues with unabated interest. About seventy-five have been hopefully converted. Last niongstreet's army), near Dandridge, Tennessee, in the camp church at Galveston, Texas, and in the Twenty-third Georgia Regiment, Colquitt's Brigade, near Charleston, South Carolina. Of the 111 professors of religion in the Fifty-fifth North Carolina Regiment, Davis's Brigade, 3 are Lutherans, 4 Presbyterians, 8 unconnected with
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
our proportion. The only thing that would palliate the conscription of ministers would be that it would fill up all the vacant chaplaincies. I learn, from a private source, that Rev. L. W. Allen, of Virginia (widely known and loved), who was captured while serving as captain of a cavalry company, is engaged at Fort Johnson in carrying on a very interesting revival, in which a number of our officers have professed conversion and been baptized in the lake. How wonderful are the ways of Providence! army of Northern Virginia, March 1, 1864. Perhaps I can give a better idea of our work in the army by a few quotations from my diary. Saturday, February 20. Preached to a large and very attentive congregation in Davis's Mississippi Brigade, and after preaching received five for baptism. They are having a most precious revival in this brigade, and Rev. Mr. Witherspoon, the efficient chaplain of the Forty-second Mississippi, is alone, very much broken down, and calling loudly for
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
evival was manifested by the number of ministers sent among the soldiers. We give a list of those who are sent by the Mission Board of the Methodist Episcopal Church South: Revs. Leo. Rosserand J. C. Granberry in the Army of Northern Virginia; J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, B. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's Corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides these, and others probably whose names have escaped us, the Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church South emulated other Churches in sending forth laborers into the great harvest. Rev. Dr. Myers, of the Southern Christian Advocate, in noticing these facts, says: The Mississippi Confer
Applewood (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ndebted for transportation, from Staunton to the army and back, to Brother C. F. Fry, one of the most efficient colporters of our Virginia Baptist Board. Brother Fry has a little covered wagon admirably arranged for carrying his tracts, books, rations, forage, etc., in which he kindly took me. For several days in Staunton I enjoyed the hospitality of Brother Geo. B. Taylor. Besides the duties of his pastorate, Brother Taylor is doing a great work in the Staunton hospitals. occasional. Applewood, December 31, 1864. To-day closes the eventful year 1864! Reflections crowd the memory almost to stupefaction. Faith and patience have their amplest verge, piety and patriotism their widest scope, in our present condition. Not unlike the Israelites, we are passing through darkness drear to better and brighter prospects beyond. Among the memories of the past my mind rests upon the close of 1863. Then in prison on Johnston's Island we thought it not unfitting to spend the day in reli
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
re sent by the Mission Board of the Methodist Episcopal Church South: Revs. Leo. Rosserand J. C. Granberry in the Army of Northern Virginia; J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, B. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's Corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides these, and others probably whose names have escaped us, the Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church South emulated other Churches in sending forth laborers into the great harvest. Rev. Dr. Myers, of the Southern Christian Advocate, in noticing these facts, says: The Mississippi Conference appointed one missionary and two chaplains to the army; Memphis, one missionary and six chaplains;
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
a troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides these, and others probably whose names have escaped us, the Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church South emulated other Churches in sending forth laborers into the great harvest. Rev. Dr. Myers, of the Southern Christian Advocate, in noticing these facts, says: The Mississippi Conference appointed one missionary and two chaplains to the army; Memphis, one missionary and six chaplains; Alabama, four missionaries and twelve chaplains; Florida, one missionary and two chaplains; Georgia, eight missionaries and eight chaplains; South Carolina, thirteen chaplains; North Carolina, two missionaries and eight chaplains; Virginia, two missionaries and twenty chaplains. Here are nineteen missionaries and seventy-one chaplains from these eight Conferences. Of course, the Conferences beyond our lines furnish a number also; but except in the case of the general missionaries, sent out by the
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ionaries and twelve chaplains; Florida, one missionary and two chaplains; Georgia, eight missionaries and eight chaplains; South Carolina, thirteen chaplains; North Carolina, two missionaries and eight chaplains; Virginia, two missionaries and twenty chaplains. Here are nineteen missionaries and seventy-one chaplains from these e Christloving soldiers go home to be as holy firebrands in our Churches! A. B. Woodfin, Chaplain Sixty-first Georgia. An entire congregation in Scales's (North Carolina) Brigade promptly knelt, a short while since, on an invitation for all Christians, and all who desired the special prayers of God's people to kneel. Bath Ctismal scene. Assembled on the bank of a little pond just in the rear of the trenches was a large crowd of bronzed veterans from Virginia, South Carolina and North Carolina. The great heart of the congregation united in singing, People of the living God; some passages of Scripture bearing on the ordinance were read, and prayer o
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
he men are Baptists. Cannot the Baptists of Georgia send on some earnest, working man of God to lso Brother A. Broadus, who is widely known in Georgia as one of the most efficient agents to be fouunder the parental roof. I met a noble young Georgia officer who, too badly wounded to talk, yet wer, and it is hoped that the good brethren of Georgia will offer freely of what Sherman has not takrd are running low it is to be hoped that our Georgia brethren will give liberally, of their means ere, though I constantly hear as I go amongst Georgia troops, you are the only Baptist preacher I hish that some of the good Baptist brethren of Georgia, who are preaching two or three times per monnce. And yet this brigade, from the heart of Georgia, and so largely Baptistic in sentiment, that g brother among the large Baptist ministry of Georgia who is willing to come and labor among these through the hospital the other day a gallant Georgia offices recognized the Index in my hand, call[5 more...]
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