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Theodorick Pryor (search for this): chapter 12
Wiatt, is untiring in his efforts among us, and is constantly working for the spiritual welfare of the men. He is greatly beloved by all, and may his labors among us be blessed more abundantly, and all of us be made to rejoice by seeing all of our regiment converted to God! Pray for us, my dear brother. Petersburg, Virginia, April 17. There is quite an interesting meeting in progress in the South Carolina hospital. It commenced some five weeks since. The chaplain is assisted by Rev. Dr. Pryor, who was providentially detained here from his field of labor in the army. His services were very acceptable, and I trust greatly blessed. Taylorsville, Virginia, April 3. I trust the Lord has commenced a gracious revival in Johnson's Brigade, now stationed at this place. Notwithstanding the weather has been very unfavorable, the work still progresses. I preached to large and attentive congregations during the past week. As many as twenty-five at one time came forward for praye
B. R. Johnson (search for this): chapter 12
e in Christ was taken away from evil to come. W. B. Carson. The Southern Christian Advocate judges, from intelligence from the Southern armies, that the great revival, commenced last year, still continues. Revivals are reported in General B. R. Johnson's Brigade (a part of Longstreet's army), near Dandridge, Tennessee, in the camp church at Galveston, Texas, and in the Twenty-third Georgia Regiment, Colquitt's Brigade, near Charleston, South Carolina. Of the 111 professors of religioev. Dr. Pryor, who was providentially detained here from his field of labor in the army. His services were very acceptable, and I trust greatly blessed. Taylorsville, Virginia, April 3. I trust the Lord has commenced a gracious revival in Johnson's Brigade, now stationed at this place. Notwithstanding the weather has been very unfavorable, the work still progresses. I preached to large and attentive congregations during the past week. As many as twenty-five at one time came forward fo
Henry A. Wise (search for this): chapter 12
ng for your brave defenders. occasional. Camp near Orange Court House, January 4, 1864. camp Twenty-Sixth Virginia, General Wise's Brigade, near Charleston, S. C., January 6. It gives me great pleasure to inform you and the friends of our regimle. . . . . A. E. D. Brother Geo. F. Bagby, South Carolina, writes: Since I last wrote you I have visited portions of Wise's Brigade, preached several times on James' Island (the number of hopeful conversions during our meeting there reached one D. Leachman, Chaplain Twentieth Virginia Regiment Cavalry. Captain A. W. Poindexter, Twenty-sixth Virginia Regiment, Wise's Brigade: Enclosed you will please find $101 contributed by my company (K, Twenty-sixth Virginia Infantry) for army colpoeligion, suitable men for the great work of preaching the Gospel. L. C. Vass, Permanent Clerk. Brother J. A. Gresham, Wise's Brigade: Our good meetings are still going on, with increased interest. Since their commencement, some eight or nine ha
Rosserand J. C. Granberry (search for this): chapter 12
evival, gives the following as to the appointments of the great denomination with which he is connected, and which fully redeemed its well-known reputation for missionary zeal by its abundant labors in this great harvest-field: The earnest purpose of the home Churches to promote the army revival was manifested by the number of ministers sent among the soldiers. We give a list of those who are sent by the Mission Board of the Methodist Episcopal Church South: Revs. Leo. Rosserand J. C. Granberry in the Army of Northern Virginia; J. B. McFerrin, C. W. Miller, W. Mooney, B. P. Ransom, and W. Burr in the Army of Tennessee; J. S. Lane and E. B. Duncan in the Department of Florida; J. J. Wheat and H. J. Harris in Mississippi; W. C. Johnson to General S. D. Lee's Corps, North Mississippi; J. J. Hutchinson to army about Mobile; and beyond the Mississippi river, J. C. Keener to Louisiana troops, and B. T. Kavanaugh and E. M. Marvin to Missouri and Arkansas troops. Besides thes
Atticus G. Haygood (search for this): chapter 12
here is an increase of religious interest, but I defer particulars until after our chaplains meeting to-morrow. J. W. J. camp near Orange Court House, Va., March 20, 1864. March 24, 1864. Rev. J. D. Chambers, missionary of the Virginia Baptist Sunday-School and Publication Board, reports a very extensive and powerful revival in progress in Bryant's Georgia Brigade, under the labors of Chaplains C. H. Toy, W. L. Curry and J. C. Camp (all three Baptists), and the brigade missionary, Rev. Mr. Haygood (a Methodist minister). There is a fine state of religious feeling throughout that army, but a great lack of chaplains; and both officers and men are very anxious to fill the vacancies. The supply of religious literature—books, tracts and papers—by no means equals the demand. Rev. Andrew B. Cross, in an account of a visit to Fort Delaware, states that, while our prisoners were eating dinner, he proposed to preach for them. They readily assented, and circulated the notice among the
H. W. Dodge (search for this): chapter 12
g from this school of self-denial and privation, shall form a ministry more worthy than we to follow in the footsteps of the people's preacher. I had the privilege of baptizing eleven candidates again on yesterday—making sixty-seven that I have baptized within the past month. Rev. Dr. Burrows is again laboring in our camp, Rev. A. Broaddus, Sr., arrived on yesterday, and I learn that Rev. Dr. Jeter (who has recently spent several weeks of very successful labor in the artillery), and Rev. H. W. Dodge (pastor of our Church in Lynchburg, and one of the brightest ornaments of the Virginia Baptist pulpit), will be on in a few days to remain some time with us. Can't you send us some of your best Georgia Baptist preachers? Brethren may think that I always harp on one string, but I mean to harp on it until they remove the cause by coming up to our help in this great work. We are having beautiful weather now, and the indications of an early move grow stronger daily. I saw a large n
cease to remember our Churches in our prayers. Do they remember us? Wm. E. Wiatt, Chaplain Twenty-Sixth Virginia Regiment. There is a company in one of our Virginia regiments which numbers eighty men, all of whom, except ten, are now connected with some evangelical denomination. Bible-classes have been formed, embracing the entire company, and the little handful who are yet out of Christ give manifest tokens of deep religious impressions. There is a Bible-class in every company of Doles's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. Charleston, South Carolina. It gives me great pleasure to report, that our meeting continues with unabated interest. About seventy-five have been hopefully converted. Last night was truly a refreshing time with us. It was difficult to get away from Church. Many of the inquirers refused to leave after the benediction, and of course we stayed with them. We had three or four additional prayers, and before we left the house (which was about half-pa
J. M. Hart (search for this): chapter 12
consciences and their Bible with what denomination they will connect themselves. J. W. J. I have spent a few days of late with the artillery of Hill's Corps, only one battalion of which, I believe, has a chaplain. Brother M. D. Anderson, our colporter, is laboring very faithfully in this field. A few days since one of the battalions, in which his efforts have been blessed to the good of many souls, sent him $100, and a letter expressive of their high appreciation of his work. Brother J. M. Hart, of the Crenshaw Battery, gave me the following account of a work of grace with which his battalion had been blessed: Last summer, while we were in Orange, one of your colporters (Brother Clopton) visited us. He conversed with the men, supplied them with reading matter, and from day to day held prayer-meetings with us. The Divine Spirit was bestowed upon the effort and almost every man was more or less concerned about his soul. Many professed conversion and united with God's people.
Evangelist (search for this): chapter 12
nd. He was busily and successfully prosecuting his work—going from house to house to plead the claims of the soldier. I met him when our army was drawn up in line of battle at Mine Run, just in rear of our lines, and in reply to our exclamation of surprise at seeing him there, he said that he was collecting money for army colportage. A bad time and place, most persons would have thought, but he was succeeding very well. Our Virginia board has recently appointed Rev. E. J. Willis General Evangelist in Ewell's Corps. It would have been hard to find a better man for the place. Brother Willis's life has been a checkered but useful one. Graduating in his literary course at a Northern college, and in law at the University of Virginia, he practised his profession for awhile in his native State, and then emigrated to California about the beginning of the gold fever. He was successful in his profession, and soon elevated to the position of judge, with a prospect of still higher honor
Andrew B. Cross (search for this): chapter 12
extensive and powerful revival in progress in Bryant's Georgia Brigade, under the labors of Chaplains C. H. Toy, W. L. Curry and J. C. Camp (all three Baptists), and the brigade missionary, Rev. Mr. Haygood (a Methodist minister). There is a fine state of religious feeling throughout that army, but a great lack of chaplains; and both officers and men are very anxious to fill the vacancies. The supply of religious literature—books, tracts and papers—by no means equals the demand. Rev. Andrew B. Cross, in an account of a visit to Fort Delaware, states that, while our prisoners were eating dinner, he proposed to preach for them. They readily assented, and circulated the notice among their companions. I went out and selected a spot in the barrack yard, which was protected from the wind and where the sun shone very warm. Here were gathered in a few minutes almost one thousand men, who stood listening attentively for over half an hour that I talked to them, and then seemed unwilling
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