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t the Petersburg Evangelical Tract Society. He expressed his gratification with this meeting. The committee on the badge was continued, that they might ascertain the cost of several devices. Brother Lacy was requested to communicate to General Pendleton our desire to hear him at our next meeting. Adjourned with singing and benediction till next Tuesday week, May 5, 1863. L. C. Vass, Secretary. Seventh session. round Oak Church, Tuesday, May 12. [The session appointed for May 5 was prevented by the battles of Second Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville.] At 12 o'clock General Pendleton preached on the duties and responsibilities of the chaplain's work from the text: Study to show thyself approved of God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. 2 Timothy II. 15. He spoke earnestly of the importance of our work, and cautioned against a natural tendency to indolence and sloth. He urged as essential qualifications for the wo
n its effects. The spiritual condition of the men in the army, at this time and after, was thought to be deeper and stronger than that of the people at home —commonly said, that all the religion was in the army. I never saw this influence more visibly expressed than at a Sabbath-day service held near Fredericksburg, at the old quarters occupied by General Jackson previous to the second battle of Fredericksburg or Chancellorsville. It was the first quiet Sabbath after the battles—Sabbath, May 10. The services were conducted by Rev. B. T. Lacy, who preached from the text, All things work together for good to those that love God, etc.: Rom. VIII. The attendance was very large—between 2,500 and 3,000—consisting of privates and officers of all grades, from General Lee down. I never witnessed such thoughtfulness and seriousness depicted on the faces of any auditors. The preacher stated this was General Jackson's favorite text—then unfolded the doctrine and the peculiar comfort to
my in the wilderness of Orange and Spottsylvania. Ministrations to the wounded and dying were all that chaplains could render up to the time that I was detached from the regiment, immediately after the disaster at Spottsylvania Court House on 12th of May, and ordered to the field-hospital (permanent) of our corps, by a written order from General Ewell, through Chief-Surgeon McGuire. That disaster, in fact, terminated the separate existence of the Stonewall Brigade; and here properly this histacy was requested to communicate to General Pendleton our desire to hear him at our next meeting. Adjourned with singing and benediction till next Tuesday week, May 5, 1863. L. C. Vass, Secretary. Seventh session. round Oak Church, Tuesday, May 12. [The session appointed for May 5 was prevented by the battles of Second Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville.] At 12 o'clock General Pendleton preached on the duties and responsibilities of the chaplain's work from the text: Study to
day; and as the wounded died, and the hospital became better organized under the judicious management of Dr. Taylor, the nurses were reduced in number and dismissed to rejoin their commands. We had many reports of the enemy's approach; but for some time they did not appear. In my ministrations I endeavored daily to visit every man, irrespective of his army, and knew no man after the flesh. So large was the number that at first it took me two days to pass entirely around the hospital. On June 10, about 2 P. M., while I was in a Yankee's tent praying and reading with him, at the corner of the hospital, a clatter of sabers was heard, and looking up we saw a detachment of Federal cavalry surrounding the hospital. They fired on one or two men running across the fields, and at first some courageous assaults were made upon our meagre commissary tent; but Colonel Anderson soon rode up, arrested very promptly this robbery of stores, and soon showed that he at least had the instincts of hu
y, worn-out, besides having our rations to cook. Yet I find, on different days of the week and at irregular hours, notices of preaching and prayer-meetings, which were well and eagerly at tended by the brigade and company, and every notice of such an appointment was always hailed with joy by the men. Saturday, June 14, 1862, a day of thanksgiving to God for many mercies and protection, which was much enjoyed throughout this portion of the army; preaching and prayer-meetings in the day. June 15, much to our surprise as to our joy, no orders to move, and we spent the day quietly—preaching in the morning by Dr. Dabney; in the evening enjoyed a communion season, in which many participated and drew near to Jesus. Sunday, June 22. Much rejoiced to find we had no marching to perform to-day, but allowed a quiet rest; participated in the usual church privileges of Gordonsville, near which place we have halted. Having made forced marches last week, a rest is very grateful to-day. Mon
notice of such an appointment was always hailed with joy by the men. Saturday, June 14, 1862, a day of thanksgiving to God for many mercies and protection, which was much enjoyed throughout this portion of the army; preaching and prayer-meetings in the day. June 15, much to our surprise as to our joy, no orders to move, and we spent the day quietly—preaching in the morning by Dr. Dabney; in the evening enjoyed a communion season, in which many participated and drew near to Jesus. Sunday, June 22. Much rejoiced to find we had no marching to perform to-day, but allowed a quiet rest; participated in the usual church privileges of Gordonsville, near which place we have halted. Having made forced marches last week, a rest is very grateful to-day. Monday, up at 3 1/2 A. M., to make up for the rest of yesterday, and pushing on as fast as possible—to what point we were entirely ignorant, though indulging in surmises. (Yet going to Richmond.) Sunday, July 6, 1862. Lay under orde
at Mr. Buckner's, sent back an express to remove me if my strength would permit it. This was done, and on the day of that memorable battle I was transferred to Richmond. So obstinate was my typhoid pneumonia that I could not rejoin the army till July following, after its return from Gettysburg. The spiritual interests of the command suffered no little by the campaign, and I doubt not that the restraints of enlightened consciences saved much of that retribution upon the enemy's country whichn our brigade, preaching both night and day; I visited almost daily Scales's North Carolina Brigade, also Third and Fourth Virginia Regiments, preaching as I went, seemingly with much effect. I preached from three to five times per day all during July and August, besides baptizing almost daily. The labors of these months broke me down and I was forced to leave my command on sick furlough. From this time I was not of much service to the brigade until winter. During my absence the prayer-meeti
orge F. Bagby, Baptist, Chaplain Fortieth Virginia, and Army Evangelist.] Elizaville, Kentucky, March 13, 1867. My Dear Brother: I enlisted as a private soldier in Company A, Fortieth Virginia, May, 1861. Labored thus, preaching every Sunday, holding prayermeet-ings every evening in different commands, and distributing tracts. Soon began to see fruits; several professed conversion, without any extra efforts in way of protracted meetings. Was commissioned chaplain Fortieth Virginia, July 19, and continued to labor as above until March, 1862. Resigned chaplaincy, and soon accepted an appointment as colporter in Wise's Brigade. Held a protracted meeting with one of the commands, afterward of Fourth Virginia, Colonel Goode. Several, say four or five, professed conversion, and several others were revived and reclaimed to the cause. In 1863, I forget what month, together with Brother A. Broaddus and Brother W. E. Wiatt, one of the most faithful men I ever knew, chaplain of the
hat I could not rejoin the army till July following, after its return from Gettysburg. The spiritual interests of the command suffered no little by the campaign, and I doubt not that the restraints of enlightened consciences saved much of that retribution upon the enemy's country which the world would have justified. Brigadier General J. A. Walker was now commanding the brigade. Its numbers and aspect had greatly changed under the rigors of that demoralizing and arduous campaign. On 22d July we set in motion for the eastern side of the Blue Ridge. While resting a day in Madison county I embraced an opportunity for calling together the Christians of my regiment, procuring a roll of some fifty of them who remained; temporarily arranged them in clubs for family prayer, nights after tattoo, and mornings after first roll-call. When we halted longer in Orange, we threw all these clubs into one regimental prayer-meeting, to be conducted exclusively by the professors of religion in
amped near Orange Court House. Here again we met in Christ's name and He met with us. Never before have I seen the like; often we would meet to worship, having only the dim candle-light; hundreds would be there. When an invitation was given for prayers there would come so many I knew not what to do with them. At this time Brother Barrett was at home, but Brother Moore was present. I did all of the preaching that I could. At this time kept my command supplied with tracts, papers, etc. In August and September I spent some time with General Walker's Virginia Brigade, where souls were being converted. On one occasion, in August, 1863, I went down to Rapidan river with Brother Anderson, chaplain in General Walker's Virginia Brigade, to baptize. We met about 2,000 soldiers, besides many citizens. He (Brother Anderson) went down into the water and baptized twelve. After he came out I opened service in our usual way by singing and prayer. Such music I never before heard. It sounded
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