hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jesus Christ 528 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 207 7 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 150 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 127 3 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 113 1 Browse Search
Virginia Baptist 110 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 104 0 Browse Search
T. J. Jackson 104 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 88 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 84 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. Search the whole document.

Found 2,724 total hits in 871 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
. Kirby Smith's Corps, which formed the right wing of General Bragg's invading force. Leaving Knoxville, we crossed the Cumberland Mountain, and entered the civilized part of Kentucky at Big Hill. the Fourth Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, some weeks after we went into camp at Knoxville, East Tennessee. I was then elected chaplain. Colonel Wm. M. Churchwell was in command of thnight. June 10. I attended the funeral of General Robert Hatton at the Methodist church in Knoxville. He fell at the front of his command, while charging a battery at the battle of Chickahominy,ber 26. By request of Dr. Gardner I went with our sick soldiers to Strawberry Plains, then to Knoxville, where I met Colonel Reeves, a Baptist minister, whom I found very affable. October 27. Vihe Methodist church in Chattanooga. We renewed our acquaintance formed while he was pastor at Knoxville, where I first entered camp two years ago. Sunday, July 12, 1863. Too wet for camp service
Thomson (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ork and Chester, to Chesterville, South Carolina, by the wagon train, a distance of one hundred and fifty miles. Two weeks were consumed in the trip. At Chesterville we took the train for Raleigh, North Carolina. The Heralds now on hand have been brought two hundred miles by Government wagons free of charge. The first Sabbath in the month I spent in Milledgeville, Georgia, and preached for Brother George Yarbrough, who gave me the welcome of a brother. The second Sunday I was in Thomson, Georgia, where I took up a collection of $206 for your association, preached there twice, and once at night in Warrenton, Georgia, when our wagon train was passing through. At Camp Organization, near Augusta, I preached twice on fast day to very large, attentive audiences; also at the same place the night preceding the march to Chesterville, The chaplains at Camp Organization, Brothers Hanks and Gregory, held a protracted meeting for several days with good results—a number of penitents, a
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
fe and death. Rev. Dr. B. T. Kavanaugh, one of the most efficient laborers in Price's command, wrote to Dr. W. W. Bennett the following account of the revivals in that corps, on both sides of the Mississippi: Among those who came out of Missouri with General Price's army were John R. Bennett (your brother), W. M. Patterson, Nathaniel M. Talbott, and myself, besides Brothers Minchell, Harris, Dryden, and McCary. Subsequently we were joined by Brother E. M. Marvin (now Bishop) and others.hers Jewell and Winfield, of Camden, were zealously and constantly engaged in the great work in the encampment near their homes, and were very successful. At Three-Creeks I had the efficient aid of Brothers Talbott, Minchell, and Dryden, from Missouri, and a Baptist chaplain from Arkansas, whose name I do not remember. To sum up the results of these gracious revivals in the army, we may safely say that at Three-Creeks there were 500 conversions. Under Brothers Winfield and Jewell there we
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
gefield, Newberry, Laurens, Spartanburg, Union, York and Chester, to Chesterville, South Carolina, by the wagon train, a distance of one hundred and fifty miles. Two weeks were consumed in the trip. At Chesterville we took the train for Raleigh, North Carolina. The Heralds now on hand have been brought two hundred miles by Government wagons free of charge. The first Sabbath in the month I spent in Milledgeville, Georgia, and preached for Brother George Yarbrough, who gave me the welcome ofhteous scarcely saved. Slept with Chaplains Tomkies and Giles of Florida Brigade. April 10. Smithfield evacuated; went to Raleigh and assisted Brother Crowder till nearly midnight in packing Testaments, psalms, tracts, and hymns. Raleigh, North Carolina, April 11. Got my literature on a soldiers' train, and a seat on the top of a box-car, and left Raleigh at 4 P. M. April 12. Greensboroa, North Carolina, was reached in time for breakfast. We came slowly and stopped often on accoun
Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ourth and Eleventh Tennessee Regiments were ordered to Cumberland Gap, where we established comfortable winter quarters. Ththout chaplains. I was alone a portion of the time at Cumberland Gap, and my congregations were generally small; yet I preauch extracts as I think may be of interest to them. Cumberland Gap, February 20, 1862. Frank Wallace, quite a youth, cama prayer-meeting he conducted on the mountain spurs at Cumberland Gap. No other man was more helpful to me in army work in I found our troops at Bean's Station, having evacuated Cumberland Gap in my absence. I gave our soldiers a talk on the 4th, a night march from Walden's Ridge through Tazewell to Cumberland Gap. Sunday, August 17. Lay in front of the Gap all daook the Crab Orchard Road, while our corps returns via Cumberland Gap to East Tennessee. Sunday, October 19. Preached fo North Carolina Regiment. Walked up to the Peak above Cumberland Gap, where we so often held our prayer meetings months ago
Tilton (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
augh, and Captain Sutherland, Twenty-third Alabama, and Alabama Conference; Chaplain W. A. Parks, Fifty-second Georgia, and Georgia Conference, each preached once or oftener, and others may have preached in my absence that I did not hear, besides these named. I only mention such as I heard. Nearly every time there was preaching penitents were called, and we would have from two to fifteen to come forward and from one to four professions nightly. I went to the front two or three Sundays, at Tilton, where I found Brother J. G. Bolton with a fine Sunday-school. The Brinsfields there took an active part in that work. I found in March a revival prevailing in Finley's Florida Brigade. General Finley, an Episcopalian, encouraging Chaplains Wiggins and Tomkins in the good work. General Manigault, an Episcopalian, attended camp service when I visited his brigade. Colonel Jones, a Methodist, in Walthall's Brigade, active in camp service. Also, a good revival in Dea's Brigade, in March.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
E. A. Bolles, General Agent of the Bible Societies in South Carolina, said, in speaking of his work in the winter of 1861-6t under the auspices of the Executive Committee of the South Carolina Bible Convention. During this time several thousand czealous and beloved chaplain, Rev. W. S. Black, of the South Carolina Conference, gave notice to the different commanders ofter of Louisville, Kentucky, is going out with us. Met South Carolina soldiers to-day for first time. Marched six miles frowho were furloughed home, now returning to our army in South Carolina. Receipts for the month: Mr. Thompson, Mrs. Morton,d frequent camp services there until our march through South Carolina, via Edgefield and Laurens' Court-House and Spartanburn Kennedy received me very kindly. The march across South Carolina was under General S. D. Lee. From Charlotte we went tay horse, which brought me from North Carolina through South Carolina into Georgia, and I started home via Columbus, Georgia
Barnesville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
y-seventh Georgia Regiment, was one of the noblest bodies of men with whom I came in personal contact during the war. I found the surgeon, Dr. R. B. Gardner, of Barnesville, a most congenial, companionable Christian man of sweet spirit and exemplary character. Dr. Gardner after the war wished to live in Tennessee, and at my suggesdeath. The assistant surgeon, Dr. Holmes, was also a true Christian of manly deportment. Among others to whom I was strongly attached were Captains Carter, of Barnesville, and Wilson, of Spring Place—the latter a Presbyterian of culture, and the former a wam-hearted Methodist. They and many others whose names I doubt not are nownd there were penitents, professions, and profuse praise by the pardoned and happy Christian soldiers. Then I was at Spring Place, Dalton, The Rock, Thomaston, Barnesville, and a camp-meeting in Upson county, Georgia. Then to La Fayette, and on to Chickamauga. Could not preach on Sunday, September 13, our division was marching
Smithfield, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
A. M. and 4 P. M. to the sick and wounded in the hospitals and at 3 P. M. to the colored people. Post Chaplain Kennedy received me very kindly. The march across South Carolina was under General S. D. Lee. From Charlotte we went to Smithfield, North Carolina, via Raleigh, on the railroad. There had been some fighting about Averysboro, near Smithfield, during our march by the Army of Tennessee. At Smithfield I was kept busy during the week distributing religious reading to the chaplains and equally so for many years after the war, in building up a good church at Smyrna, Tennessee. No better man in the army or Presbyterian Church, I think. He died some years ago. Preached for Cumming's and Pettus's Brigades at night. Smithfield, North Carolina, April 9, 1865. Breakfast with Chaplain Harris, Twenty-sixth Tennessee. Rode his mule to Headquarters of Lieutenant-General Stewart, now in command. Met Brothers Ransom, Burr, and Mooney, and a number of chaplains. At 11 A. M. preac
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
of the Methodist Church in Winchester, Tennessee, in 1860-61 The First Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, was organized in that place in April, 1861. Colonel Peter Turner, now the senior Sup things, but I remained a private until the organization of the Fourth Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, some weeks after we went into camp at Knoxville, East Tennessee. I was then electeday, Forty-fifth Tennessee, and Rev. S. S. Taylor, Thirty-seventh Georgia Regiments. The Confederate States Bible Society, or some other association, consigned to me several thousand copies of the Neneral Bragg's army, That we recommend to the various religious denominations in the Confederate States of America that they institute an inquiry into the support of their ministers in the army, and ges of tracts for the Soldiers' Tract Association; 225 Bibles and 1,600 Testaments for the Confederate States Bible Society; and 100,000 pages of tracts of the Evangelical Tract Society, besides a few
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...