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Readyville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
the last sermon of the Manchester meetings. Snow on the 5th, and Sunday, 7th, the division was marching to McMinnville. Captain Brady, a most excellent Christian, killed in Georgia, 1864. From McMinnville we marched to Woodberry, thence to Reedyville, where we encamped on Stone's River. Here I met General Joseph E. Johnston for the first time, with whom I was most favorably impressed. Also met General Bushrod Johnson. Reedyville, Tenn., December 13. Preached at night for Eleventh TennReedyville, Tenn., December 13. Preached at night for Eleventh Tennessee Regiment and Third Georgia Battalion. Sunday, 14. Preached in the forenoon for Fifty-second Georgia Regiment. Colonel, lieutenant-colonel, and major set the soldiers a good example by attending service. Am much pleased with officers and men of this command. Dined with Rev. Dr. Harpe, a most genial Christian gentleman. Returned to our quarters and preached in the afternoon. December 15. Visited the Pisgah Hospital. Many sick of the Forty-third Georgia and Forty-sixth Alabama t
Auburn, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ing when captured. Those who took the President at night I presume did not know the difference between a gentleman's robe de chambre and a lady's apparel. Some time was spent with Chaplain Bolton, of Tennessee, with our true, tried army friends at their homes in Barnesville and Thomaston, and elsewhere in Pike and Upson Counties, Georgia, and I mounted my faithful gray horse, which brought me from North Carolina through South Carolina into Georgia, and I started home via Columbus, Georgia; Auburn and Tuscaloosa, Alabama; Aberdeen, Mississippi; and Moulton, Alabama, and home again to Tennessee, July 13, after an absence in the army of four years and four days since I first left my charge at Winchester, Tennessee, August 9, 1861. Never before or since did I have such a broad and inviting field for constant work and great usefulness as I did in the Army of Tennessee. My appreciation of Southern manhood and true chivalry and consistent Christianity was increased and intensified by my
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
an in other portions of the Confederacy, but there were happy signs of spiritual life among the troops in the far South and West. On Sullivan's Island, near Charleston, S. C., there was a blessed work of grace, which powerfully checked the ordinary vices of the camp and brought many souls into the fold of the Good Shepherd. Speakre forever lost, for the want of proper counsel? God forbid. Dr. Bennett thus continues his narrative of the great revival in the summer of 1863: Charleston, South Carolina, was a point of great interest during the whole period of the war, and the fiery temper of the men who opened the fearful drama might be supposed to be he hearts of the soldiers that no hardship, no suffering, can undermine or break down. Bishop Lay, of the P. E. Church, in a letter to a relative in Charleston, South Carolina, describes a scene of the deepest interest in the same army. The Bishop was earnestly laboring as a missionary in the Georgia army. He says: Yest
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Missionary Ridge, November 25. The Army of Tennessee remained encamped on the south and east of Chattanooga, from Lookout Mountain to the base and crest of Missionary Ridge near two months, or until the 25th of November, 1863. Rev. Mr. Stacey, of y of the chaplains at the post of duty. November 3 and 4. The chaplains of the army met in a two days council on Lookout Mountain, and held two sessions each day. Rev. B. W. McDonald, D. D., of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, was Chairman; Chain A. D. McVoy, Fifty-eighth Alabama, Secretary. I clip report from The Army and Navy Herald: Lookout Hotel, On Lookout Mountain, November 3, 1863. A meeting of the chaplains and missionaries of the Army of the Tennessee convened at the abovers offered a preamble and resolutions, which were approved, in reference to the destitute and suffering families on Lookout Mountain and in the vicinity of this army. Ordered to be forwarded to General Bragg by the Secretary. B. W. McDonald offe
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
e favor of Major Hall to Camak. Learning that Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee would leave Augusta on the 18th for Charlotte, North Carolina, I collected all my supplies together for shipment to our soldiers in North Carolina. After furnishing Generalth Mississippi. Sunday, April 2. Heard Dr. J. B. McFerrin preach at 11 A. M. and 7 P. M. at the Methodist church in Charlotte, N. C. I preached at 9 A. M. and 4 P. M. to the sick and wounded in the hospitals and at 3 P. M. to the colored people. Post Chaplain Kennedy received me very kindly. The march across South Carolina was under General S. D. Lee. From Charlotte we went to Smithfield, North Carolina, via Raleigh, on the railroad. There had been some fighting about Averysboro, nea the early home of President Andrew Jackson; marched all night, going through Concord at midnight. April 19. Charlotte, North Carolina, was reached early in the morning. Stoneman has burnt the bridge across the Catawba River before us to-day. H
Columbus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
wife's clothing when captured. Those who took the President at night I presume did not know the difference between a gentleman's robe de chambre and a lady's apparel. Some time was spent with Chaplain Bolton, of Tennessee, with our true, tried army friends at their homes in Barnesville and Thomaston, and elsewhere in Pike and Upson Counties, Georgia, and I mounted my faithful gray horse, which brought me from North Carolina through South Carolina into Georgia, and I started home via Columbus, Georgia; Auburn and Tuscaloosa, Alabama; Aberdeen, Mississippi; and Moulton, Alabama, and home again to Tennessee, July 13, after an absence in the army of four years and four days since I first left my charge at Winchester, Tennessee, August 9, 1861. Never before or since did I have such a broad and inviting field for constant work and great usefulness as I did in the Army of Tennessee. My appreciation of Southern manhood and true chivalry and consistent Christianity was increased and int
Gainsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
y of Tennessee, for the invaluable services they rendered the association in securing an early shipment of the paper, and saving several thousand dollars for the benefit of the soldiers and the association. Our thanks are also due Mr. Jones and Honeycut for assistance given me. I am glad to report that the trains are thronged daily with the soldiers who were furloughed home, now returning to our army in South Carolina. Receipts for the month: Mr. Thompson, Mrs. Morton, B. Banks, Gainsville, Georgia, $20 each; Mrs. M. E. Hundley, Mrs. Dr. Jas. Jones, $10 each, Thompson, Georgia. Distributions: 7,000 copies of the Army and Navy Herald; 112 Bibles; 300 Testaments; 200 gospels, and 9 sermons preached. S. M. Cherry. Milledgeville, March 1, 1865. Report for March, 1865. Rev. Robert J. Harp, Superintendent: Dear Brother: The 4th of March I received at Milledgeville 15,000 copies of the Army and Navy Herald of the issues of February 16 and 23, and March 2. The day fo
Johnson's Island (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
the Cross with most remarkable success. Not only in the army at home did our soldiers manifest the deepest interest in religion, but even in the dreary prisons of the North they prayed for and received the Divine blessing. An officer at Johnson's Island writes to the Southern Presbyterian: This is the last quarter of a long, long twelve-months' confinement. I try to pass my time as profitably as I can. We have preaching regularly every Sabbath, prayer-meetings two or three times a weeknter and spring. Hundreds in many parts of the army are seeking the fellowship of Christians by uniting with the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ. Asa Hartz, a gallant and gifted Confederate officer, thus writes from the Federal prison on Johnson's Island: We vary our monotony with an occasional exchange. May I tell you what I mean by that? Well, it is a simple ceremony. God help us! The exchanged is placed on a small wagon drawn by one horse, his friends form a line in the rear, and t
Chester, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
e Districts of Edgefield, Newberry, Laurens, Spartanburg, Union, York and Chester, to Chesterville, South Carolina, by the wagon train, a distance of one hundred and fifty miles. Two weeks were consumed in the trip. At Chesterville we took the train for Raleigh, North Carolina. The Heralds now on hand have been brought two hundred miles by Government wagons free of charge. The first Sabbath iy to very large, attentive audiences; also at the same place the night preceding the march to Chesterville, The chaplains at Camp Organization, Brothers Hanks and Gregory, held a protracted meetingource of supply of religious reading for our soldiers now accessible. S. M. Cherry. Chesterville, South Carolina, March 31, 1865. Dying words. Marietta, Georgia, June 9, 1864. Thomas F. Folkt-House and Spartanburg and Union Districts and across the Saluda, Enoree and Broad Rivers to Chesterville. This march across the State we made March 18 to 31. I was in company with Chaplains M. B.
Thomaston, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
nth after the surrender of the army; met some of the escort there of President Davis, who were with him at his capture at Irvington, Georgia. Of course, it was a hoax about the President having on his wife's clothing when captured. Those who took the President at night I presume did not know the difference between a gentleman's robe de chambre and a lady's apparel. Some time was spent with Chaplain Bolton, of Tennessee, with our true, tried army friends at their homes in Barnesville and Thomaston, and elsewhere in Pike and Upson Counties, Georgia, and I mounted my faithful gray horse, which brought me from North Carolina through South Carolina into Georgia, and I started home via Columbus, Georgia; Auburn and Tuscaloosa, Alabama; Aberdeen, Mississippi; and Moulton, Alabama, and home again to Tennessee, July 13, after an absence in the army of four years and four days since I first left my charge at Winchester, Tennessee, August 9, 1861. Never before or since did I have such a broa
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