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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ty of the college their deep grief at the calamity which has befallen you. It may be some consolation in your bereavement to know that your son was highly esteemed by the officers and students of the college, and that this whole community unite in sorrow at his untimely death. May God in His mercy support you under this grievous trial, and give you that peace which, as it passeth all understanding, so nothing in this world can diminish or destroy it. On the death of Bishop Elliott, of Georgia, he wrote the following letter to his wife: Lexington, Virginia, February 21, 1867. My Dear Mrs. Elliott: It would be in vain for me to attempt to express my grief at your great affliction. In common with the whole country, I mourn the death of him whom for more than a quarter of a century I have admired, loved and venerated, and whose loss to the church and society, where his good offices were so important, I can never expect to see supplied. You have my deepest sympathy, and m
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
or writing to me. With great respect and true affection, your obedient servant, (Signed) R. E. Lee. The following expresses a great deal in brief compass: Lexington, February 28, 1870. Mr. Samuel R. George, 71 Mt. Vernon Place, Baltimore, Maryland: My Dear Sir; I have learned with deep regret the great sorrow that has befallen you, and sincerely sympathize in your overwhelming grief. But the great God of heaven takes us at the period when it is best for us to go, and we can only grateful thanks to your association for the honor conferred on me and believe me, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, Mr. A. N. Gordon, Corresponding Secretary Young Men's Christian Association. Rev. Dr. Brantly, of Baltimore, and Bishop Marvin, of Missouri who stayed at his house during the college commencement of 1870, both speak of the warm gratification which General Lee expressed at the encouraging report of the religious interest among the students. General
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
of the whole: To the People of the Confederate States: The termination of the Provisional Govend, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, do hereby set apart Friday, the 28th dahe reverend clergy and the people of the Confederate States to repair to their respective places of re, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, do issue this, my proclamation, setting, I, Jefferson Davis, President of these Confederate States, do issue this, my proclamation, settingnd House of Representatives of the Confederate States of America have signified their desire that aer: The Congress of the Confederate States of America do resolve, That Friday, the 8th day of April Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this, my proclamation, cugust 13, 1863. The President of the Confederate States has, in the name of the people, appointesoldiers of the Jewish persuasion in the Confederate States Army, that they may participate in the a[4 more...]
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
r fields, polluted our altars and violated the sanctity of our homes. Around our capital they gathered their forces, and, with boasting threats, claimed it as already their prize. The brave troops which rallied to its defence have extinguished these vain hopes, and under the guidance of the same Almighty hand, have scattered our enemies and driven them back in dismay. Uniting these defeated forces and the various armies which had been ravaging our coasts with the army of invasion in Northern Virginia, our enemies have renewed their attempts to subjugate us at the very place where their first effort was defeated, and the vengeance of retributive justice has overtaken the entire host in a second and complete overthrow. To this signal success accorded to our arms in the East has been graciously added another equally brilliant in the West. On the very day on which our forces were led to victory on the plains of Manassas, in Virginia, the same Almighty arm assisted us to overcome our
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
our cause and our people. R. E. Lee, General. In his dispatch announcing the result of the first day's battle in the Wilderness he says: . . . . By the blessing of God we maintained our position against every effort until night, when the contest closed. . . . . And in his dispatch concerning the advance of the enemy on the next day he says: . . . . Every advance on his part, thanks to a merciful God, has been repulsed. . . . . He closed his dispatch concerning the first day at Spottsylvania by saying: I am most thankful to the Giver of all victory that our loss is small. And that concerning the action of June 3, 1864, with: Our loss to-day has been small, and our success under the blessing of God all that we could expect. . . . . He closed his announcement of A. P. Hill's brilliant victory at Reams's Station, in August, 1864, by saying: . . . Our profound gratitude is due the Giver of all victory, and our thanks to the brave men and officers engaged. In his order as
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
lessed be the name of the Lord. In the hours of night, when there is nothing to lighten the full weight of my grief, I feel as if I should be overwhelmed. I had always counted, if God should spare me a few days of peace after this cruel war was ended, that I should have her with me. But year after year my hopes go out, and I must be resigned. The daughter whose death is so touchingly alluded to in the above letter was Miss Annie Carter Lee, who died at Warren, White Sulphur Springs, North Carolina, the 20th of October, 1862. At the close of the war the citizens of the county erected over her grave a handsome monument, which was unveiled with appropriate ceremonies. In response to an invitation to be present, General Lee wrote the following: Rockbridge Baths, July 25, 1866. Ladies: I have read with deep emotion your letter of the 17th instant, inviting myself and family to witness the erection of a monument over the remains of my daughter, at Warren, White Sulphur Springs,
Washington College (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
y know that all the young men in the college were good Christians, I should have nothing more to desire. General Lee was deeply interested in the Young Men's Christian Association of the college, and seemed highly gratified at its large measure of success. His letter in reply to one making him an honorary member of the association was as follows: My Dear Sir: I have received your letter announcing my election as an honorary member of the Young Men's Christian Association of Washington College—a society in whose prosperity I take the deepest interest and for the welfare of whose members my prayers are daily offered. Please present my grateful thanks to your association for the honor conferred on me and believe me, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, Mr. A. N. Gordon, Corresponding Secretary Young Men's Christian Association. Rev. Dr. Brantly, of Baltimore, and Bishop Marvin, of Missouri who stayed at his house during the college commencement of 18
Orange County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
her death. I am, with great respect, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee. Mrs. Joseph S. Jones, Mrs. Thomas Carroll, Miss Brownlow, Committee Miss M. Alston, Mrs. J. M. Heck, Mrs. Lucinda Jones, His son's wife, to whom he was deeply attached, and to whom he wrote many touchingly beautiful letters, full of the consolations and hopes of the Gospel, died while her husband (General W. H. F. Lee) was in a Northern prison, and on his return General Lee wrote him the following: camp, Orange county, April 24, 1864. I received last night, my dear son, your letter of the 22d. It has given me great comfort. God knows how I loved your dear, dear wife, how sweet her memory is to me, and how I mourn her loss. My grief could not be greater if you had been taken from me. You were both equally dear to me. My heart is too full to speak on this subject, nor can I write. But my grief is for ourselves, not for her. She is brighter and happier than ever—safe from all evil, and awaiting u
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
e victory. The signal manifestations of Divine mercy that have distinguished the eventful and glorious campaign of the year just closing give assurance of hope that under the guidance of the same Almighty hand the coming year will be no less fruitful of events that will insure the safety, peace and happiness of our beloved country, and add new lustre to the already imperishable name of the Army of Northern Virginia. R. E. Lee, General. In his dispatch to President Davis, after Chancellorsville, he said: We have again to thank Almighty God for a great victory. And in his general orders to his troops he holds this significant language: . . . . While this glorious victory entitles you to the praise and gratitude of the nation, we are especially called upon to return our grateful thanks to the only Giver of victory, for the signal deliverance He has wrought. It is, therefore, earnestly recommended that the troops unite, on Sunday next, in ascribing unto the Lord of ho
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
orary member of the Young Men's Christian Association of Washington College—a society in whose prosperity I take the deepest interest and for the welfare of whose members my prayers are daily offered. Please present my grateful thanks to your association for the honor conferred on me and believe me, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, Mr. A. N. Gordon, Corresponding Secretary Young Men's Christian Association. Rev. Dr. Brantly, of Baltimore, and Bishop Marvin, of Missouri who stayed at his house during the college commencement of 1870, both speak of the warm gratification which General Lee expressed at the encouraging report of the religious interest among the students. General Lee was a member of the Episcopal Church, and was sincerely attached to the church of his choice; but his large heart took in Christians of every name; he treated ministers of all denominations with the most marked courtesy and respect; and it may be truly said of him that he had a
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