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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
s grouped around his bed, sung several of his favorite pieces. He spent a restless night, tossing in pain upon his bed, and all the relief he felt was from sponging his brow with cold water. Sunday, May 10th, was ushered in — the last day of Jackson's earthly life. He had often said he would prefer to die on the Sabbath. His wish was to be fulfilled. His end seemed so near that Dr. Morrison felt it due to inform Mrs. Jackson of his condition. Mrs. Jackson, knowing that he had often saids we will give. The following anecdote was given by Rev. Dr. Lacy, in his lecture before the old command of the hero, on the Reminiscences of Jackson: I had often heard of that indescribable change of manner and appearance which came over Jackson when the war-bugle summoned him. I therefore watched him well. Soon couriers were seen dashing in every direction to summons out the army. That usual stooping, meek, thoughtful man was no longer before me, but a warrior, his eyes flashing, and
Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
sburg. His crossing was met and opposed. On the same night three corps were crossed several miles below that place under cover of a heavy fog. These were held at bay by our fortified positions, while General Lee repelled the attack on his left wing. Afterwards, General Hooker made pretence of withdrawing his forces below the town, and sending them to aid his right wing; and, while General Lee was fully engaged in the wilderness near Chancellorsville, he suddenly assaulted and carried Marye's Heights, the strongest Confederate position near the town. On the 2d and 3d of May, General Lee drove the enemy from all his positions on our left, and immediately returning to his own right, re-took our lost positions and drove the Federals to the shelter of heavy batteries on the north bank of the river. On returning again to the left, he found that General Hooker had abandoned his entrenchments and re-crossed the river. The following are General Lee's official dispatches to President D
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
, from which the blood began to flow freely. When his men lifted him up a groan broke from him — the only complaint in all the terrible scene. Lieutenant Smith, fearing he would die on the spot, said, General, are you much hurt? To which he replied, No, Mr. Smith; don't trouble yourself about me. After bearing him half a mile farther, most of the way under a shower of shot and shell, they reached an ambulance, in which his chief of artillery, Col. Crutchfield, lay wounded. Dr. McGuire, Jackson's chief surgeon, soon joined them, and proceeded at once to examine the General's wounds. He found him almost pulseless, but the copious bleeding had ceased. Stimulants were freely used; under their influence he revived, and the party moved on to the field hospital near Wilderness Run. To the anxious questions of his surgeon, the General said that he now felt better, but that several times as they came out of the battle he had felt as though he were about to die. The heroic calmness
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
nd, while General Lee was fully engaged in the wilderness near Chancellorsville, he suddenly assaulted and carried Marye's Heights, the strongm all his positions, from the Wilderness to within one mile of Chancellorsville. He was engaged at the same time in front by two of Longstreeas renewed. He was dislodged from his strong positions around Chancellorsville, and driven back towards the Rappahannock, over which he is nod no enemy remains south of the Rappahannock in its vicinity. Chancellorsville, May 7, 1863. After driving General Sedgwick across the Rappahannock on the night of the 4th, I returned on the 5th to Chancellorsville. The march was delayed by a storm which continued the whole nighreams. He was told on Tuesday that Hooker was entrenched near Chancellorsville. He exclaimed: That is bad-very bad. Falling asleep soon aftndleton, send in and see if there is not higher ground back of Chancellorsville. He was again in the smoke and shock of battle. On Thursday
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
en this anxious fear was suggested privately to Jackson, he answered, with a calm and assured countenance, No; let us trust that the providence of our God will so overrule it that no mischief shall result. And, verily, no mischief did result. Providence brought us precisely into conjunction with the bodies with which we were to co-operate; the battle was joined at the right juncture; and by the time the stars appeared, the right wing of the enemy, with which he was appointed to deal, was hurleic, I saw it again; and watching him more narrowly, was convinced by his closed eyes and moving lips that he was wrestling in silent prayer. I thought that I could surmise what was then passing through his fervent soul; the sovereignty of that Providence which worketh all things after the counsel of his own will, and giveth the battle not to the strong nor the race to the swift; his own fearful responsibility, and need of that counsel and sound wisdom which God alone can give; the crisis of hi
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
of deceiving General Lee, but he was met and foiled at every point. On the 28th of April he crossed three army corps over the river, about twenty miles above Fredericksburg. His crossing was met and opposed. On the same night three corps were crossed several miles below that place under cover of a heavy fog. These were held at y, wounded. (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. May 5, 1863. At the close of the battle of Chancellorsville, on Sunday, the enemy was reported advancing from Fredericksburg in our rear. General McLaws was sent back to arrest his progress, and repulsed him handsomely that afternoon. Learning that this force consisted of two coiting with Generals McLaws and Early in the afternoon, succeeded, by the blessing of Heaven, in driving General Sedgwick over the river. We have re-occupied Fredericksburg, and no enemy remains south of the Rappahannock in its vicinity. Chancellorsville, May 7, 1863. After driving General Sedgwick across the Rappahannock on
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
the army for weeks before the battle of Chancellorsville. In Barksdale's brigade, just before the fight, the number of conversions had reached two hundred, and when the heavy columns of Hooker began their movements the revival was spreading in greatest power. From their religious services the soldiers went forth to meet the foe; they hurled him back with dreadful loss, and again returned to hear the gospel from their ministers, and to hold their prayer-meetings. The Rev. W. H. Potter, of Georgia, who spent several weeks in the army, including the week of marches and battles, reported the work of grace to be progressing in a wonderful manner. Even the week's fighting did not interrupt it, but on the next Sabbath the regular services were held, and the revival went on with power. The movements of General Hooker were made with the hope of deceiving General Lee, but he was met and foiled at every point. On the 28th of April he crossed three army corps over the river, about twenty
Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
y the time the stars appeared, the right wing of the enemy, with which he was appointed to deal, was hurled in utter rout across the river. More than once, when sent to bring one of his old fighting brigades into action, I had noticed him sitting motionless upon his horse, with his right hand uplifted, while the war-worn column poured on in stern silence close by his side. At first it did not appear whether it was mere abstraction of thought or a posture to relieve his fatigue. But at Port Republic, I saw it again; and watching him more narrowly, was convinced by his closed eyes and moving lips that he was wrestling in silent prayer. I thought that I could surmise what was then passing through his fervent soul; the sovereignty of that Providence which worketh all things after the counsel of his own will, and giveth the battle not to the strong nor the race to the swift; his own fearful responsibility, and need of that counsel and sound wisdom which God alone can give; the crisis
Milford, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
trongest Confederate position near the town. On the 2d and 3d of May, General Lee drove the enemy from all his positions on our left, and immediately returning to his own right, re-took our lost positions and drove the Federals to the shelter of heavy batteries on the north bank of the river. On returning again to the left, he found that General Hooker had abandoned his entrenchments and re-crossed the river. The following are General Lee's official dispatches to President Davis: Milford, May 3, 1863. Yesterday, General Jackson penetrated to the rear of the enemy and drove him from all his positions, from the Wilderness to within one mile of Chancellorsville. He was engaged at the same time in front by two of Longstreet's divisions. This morning the battle was renewed. He was dislodged from his strong positions around Chancellorsville, and driven back towards the Rappahannock, over which he is now retreating. Many prisoners were taken, and the enemy's loss in killed
Wilderness Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
urself about me. After bearing him half a mile farther, most of the way under a shower of shot and shell, they reached an ambulance, in which his chief of artillery, Col. Crutchfield, lay wounded. Dr. McGuire, Jackson's chief surgeon, soon joined them, and proceeded at once to examine the General's wounds. He found him almost pulseless, but the copious bleeding had ceased. Stimulants were freely used; under their influence he revived, and the party moved on to the field hospital near Wilderness Run. To the anxious questions of his surgeon, the General said that he now felt better, but that several times as they came out of the battle he had felt as though he were about to die. The heroic calmness of Jackson was well displayed when he was struck down by the cruel volley from his own men. To the quick, anxious questions of his friends he replied with great composure, I believe my arm is broken, and It gives me severe pain. When asked to have his right hand bound up, he said, No
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