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d suffering condition. A young wife and mother, whose husband was in prison, wrote to one of the leading papers urging prayer for our captive soldiers, that they might have strength to bear up under their trials, and that God would remove the obstacles to a speedy exchange of prisoners. Never did men need more the consolations of religion than those who on both sides were held as prisoners of war. The winter of 1864 was extremely severe. At Cairo, Ill., the mercury, near the last of January, stood at 15 degrees below zero. At St. Louis it was at 25 below zero, and the river was crossed by heavy wagons on the solid ice. At Chicago the guards at Camp Douglass had to be changed every 30 minutes to prevent freezing, but were all frost-bitten in this short time The Times of that city said of the condition of the prisoners: The suffering and tortures endured by the prisoners was beyond the power of pen to portray. Unaccustomed to the Northern climate and cold lake and pr
January 16th (search for this): chapter 22
oring to fulfill their promises made to God upon the eve of and during the late battles. We are expecting and praying for great things. The work of Rev. L. B. Payne in hospitals in Georgia for one month was 27 sermons, distributed 300 papers, 18,000 pages of tracts, and about 32,000 pages of reading matter in books, which he had procured by soliciting donations. Some have been awakened, others professed conversion. Rev. J. W. Turner, in and near Savannah, Ga.: He preached in January 16 sermons, travelled about 400 miles, distributed 177 books, conversed privately with several soldiers on religion, and prayed with 102 soldiers who professed to be seeking Christ. Rev. A. M. Thigpen labored in Colquitt's brigade near Charleston. In the 23d Georgia, 60 conversions. The meeting was conducted in harmony by Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists. Rev. Geo. W. Yarbrough reported from General Longstreet's army near Russellville, Tenn: At Petersburg I entered upon m
February 3rd (search for this): chapter 22
as we come. Writing from Kingston, Ga., Feb. 4, Dr. J. B. McFerrin says: We have a good meeting in progress. It has been going forward since Sunday last. Large crowds, mostly soldiers, are in attendance. Many penitents, some conversions, and a few backsliders reclaimed. Last night five asked for membership in the Church of God. We give the applicants choice of Churches and receive them into various Christian organizations-different divisions, but one grand army. From Dalton, Feb. 3, Rev. A. D. McVoy sent good tidings: We have a large Brigade church built, in which we have been holding services for two weeks. About ten days ago we commenced a series of nightly meetings; at first more on the order of prayer-meetings, but the interest began to increase so rapidly that in three nights we found a revival springing up in our midst. Great crowds gather nightly. We find our church too small. Large numbers are seeking the Lord-forty to fifty every night. The word of G
February 4th (search for this): chapter 22
osen by themselves for that purpose, shall act as Moderator. The officers will meet once a month, and oftener if necessary; and in the exercise of discipline will be guided by the direction of Christ. They will keep a record of the names of all the members and the manner in which their ecclesiastical connection with this church is dissolved. From the Trans-Mississippi let us return to the banks of the Rappahannock and note the revival scenes as we come. Writing from Kingston, Ga., Feb. 4, Dr. J. B. McFerrin says: We have a good meeting in progress. It has been going forward since Sunday last. Large crowds, mostly soldiers, are in attendance. Many penitents, some conversions, and a few backsliders reclaimed. Last night five asked for membership in the Church of God. We give the applicants choice of Churches and receive them into various Christian organizations-different divisions, but one grand army. From Dalton, Feb. 3, Rev. A. D. McVoy sent good tidings:
September 10th (search for this): chapter 22
there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863-64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in having more than one hundred conversions. After the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, in Louisiana, our armies returned to Arkansas and made an encampment at a place called Three-Creeks, on the southern line of the State of Arkansas. Here I commenced preaching on the 10th of June, 1864, and continued our meetings until the 10th of September. An extensive revival commenced within a few days after our meeting commenced, and grew in interest-and power to the close. We had preaching, beginning at early candle-light-or rather pine-knot fires on stands around the preaching-place. After about ten o'clock at night, the preaching and other exercises at the stand closed; but this was but the beginning of the night's work. As soon as dismissed, the young converts gathered in groups of tens and twenties, and went off in compani
all night alone, and found myself outside of Grant's lines the next morning, and went into Selma, Ala., where I spent the summer. I requested Bishop Paine to give me a commission as a missionary to Gen. Price's army, which was then in Arkansas. I obtained it, and left the house of Robert A. Baker, my cousin, in Alabama, on the 15th of September, 1863. I succeeded in making the trip, crossing the Mississippi, just below Bolivar, swimming my horse, and arrived in Gen. Price's camp early in October. My first work was to organize all the chaplains and missionaries into an Association for mutual aid and cooperation. When we went into camp at Camp Bragg, 30 miles west of Camden, we there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863-64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in having more than one hundred conversions. After the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, in Louisiana, our armies returned to Arkansas and made a
December 17th (search for this): chapter 22
ngstreet's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military service, and will receive his appointment to a brigade when his term expires. That a faithful minister had his hands full of work in the army may be seen by the following sample report of a missionary: Dec. 17, 18, and 19.-Services consisted of exhortation, singing, and prayer. 20.-Sunday--Made appointments to preach with three Georgia regiments. Went to them. The weather too cold for service. Visited and prayed with sick. 21.-Very cold day. Visited and prayed with sick men. 22.-Regimental prayer-also visited sick men, 23--Wednesday-Assisted in religious services at Chaplains' meeting; in the afternoon preached in--Georgia, at night in---Georgia regiment. 24.-Exhortation, singi
December 18th (search for this): chapter 22
et's army; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military service, and will receive his appointment to a brigade when his term expires. That a faithful minister had his hands full of work in the army may be seen by the following sample report of a missionary: Dec. 17, 18, and 19.-Services consisted of exhortation, singing, and prayer. 20.-Sunday--Made appointments to preach with three Georgia regiments. Went to them. The weather too cold for service. Visited and prayed with sick. 21.-Very cold day. Visited and prayed with sick men. 22.-Regimental prayer-also visited sick men, 23--Wednesday-Assisted in religious services at Chaplains' meeting; in the afternoon preached in--Georgia, at night in---Georgia regiment. 24.-Exhortation, singing and
December 19th (search for this): chapter 22
y; T. 11. Stewart to Thomas' brigade, and P. 0. Harper to Gordon's brigade, Army of Virginia; and L. B. Payne temporarily to visit the hospitals between Atlanta and Guyton C. R. R. until a brigade is selected for him. Another, T. F. Pierce, is now in the State military service, and will receive his appointment to a brigade when his term expires. That a faithful minister had his hands full of work in the army may be seen by the following sample report of a missionary: Dec. 17, 18, and 19.-Services consisted of exhortation, singing, and prayer. 20.-Sunday--Made appointments to preach with three Georgia regiments. Went to them. The weather too cold for service. Visited and prayed with sick. 21.-Very cold day. Visited and prayed with sick men. 22.-Regimental prayer-also visited sick men, 23--Wednesday-Assisted in religious services at Chaplains' meeting; in the afternoon preached in--Georgia, at night in---Georgia regiment. 24.-Exhortation, singing and prayer w
Chapter 21: winter of 1863-64. The armies in the field on both sides used the interval of winter to repair their wasted energies for the spring campaign. The towns held by the Federals, and those besieged by them, continued to feel the heavy we went into camp at Camp Bragg, 30 miles west of Camden, we there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863-64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in having more than one hundred con zealous Methodist. He continued in the army to the close of the war, but for more than two years he was very wicked. In 1863 he gave his heart to God, and went to work at once for the great Captain of his salvation. He was instrumental in the arm The Georgia Conference determined, if possible, to furnish one missionary to each Georgia brigade, and at the session of 1863 the work was begun by sending seven ministers: R. B. Lester to Jackson's brigade, Army of Tennessee; A. M. Thigpen
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