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Thomas (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ain, with your permission I will give a statement of the cause of your awakening, and the state of your feelings of joy and gratitude tonight. The history of his case was given with thrilling effect. There are gleams of light amidst the dark scenes of war. The devotion of the Southern people generally to the cause for which we battled for four years, and their cheerfulness in dividing almost the last loaf with the soldiers, are worthy of permanent record. Rev. Wm. H. Stewart, of Thomas' (Georgia) brigade, pays a well-merited tribute to the people of the Valley of Virginia who felt the heavy hand of war: Let me say something about the affectionate liberality of these Valley Virginians toward our dear soldiers. They have had Jackson's army quartered here, and Shields' and Fremont's. They have had sheep, hogs, cows, horses, and negroes, stolen, and their timber destroyed; and yet their love of country and care for soldiers is unabated. Still they give their milk and butt
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
h the Army of the Potomac. General Lee confronted him with the Army of Northern Virginia. At Dalton, Ga.. was General Johnston with an admirably equipped army, and opposed to him were the gatheringheart to love God with all the mind, soul, and body, and his neighbor as himself. The work at Dalton while the army lay there was :lmost without a parallel. In the coldest and darkest nights of witheir combined efforts such a revival flame was kindled as is seldom seen in this sinful world. Dalton was the spiritual birthplace of thousands. Many are in heaven. Some still rejoice and labor on says: Ten days ago Gen. Pendleton, a hero of Manassas memory, preached to the soldiers at Dalton. General Johnston and very many other officers were present. On the same day Major-General Steords were true. In front of General Lee the Federals were gathering in immense strength. At Dalton, Ga., they massed their finest Western army against Gen. Johnston. In the far Southwest General B
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
es many other officers of lower grade and a vast number of private soldiers. Among the leading officers lost by the Federals was Gen. Wadsworth. At the same time that this bloody work was going on in Virginia the like scenes were enacted in Georgia. Here the movement was towards Richmond, there towards Atlanta. General Sherman made a determined effort to flank Gen. Johnston by a movement on Resaca; but the sagacious Confederate silently moved the mass of his army, and the Federals found reflected, that this vast machine, this mighty giant, this great unmeasured and immeasurable power, should be so terrible in battle and yet so calm and gentle and devout in the hour of peace. And of that noble army led by General Johnston in Georgia another writer said: It is wonderful to see with what patience our soldiers bear up under trials and hardships. I attribute this in part to the great religious change in our army. Twelve months after this revolution commenced a more ungo
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
nt was towards Richmond, there towards Atlanta. General Sherman made a determined effort to flank Gen. Johnston by a movement on Resaca; but the sagacious Confederate silently moved the mass of his army, and the Federals found more work on hand than they were able to do. To aid Grant in his movement from the line of the Rappahannock a heavy Federal force was concentrated on James river between Richmond and Petersburg, which was held in check by Gen. Beauregard, who had come up from Charleston, S. C. Gen. Banks was at the head of a large Federal army in Louisiana, but he was almost as unfortunate there as lie had been in the Valley of Virginia earlier in the war. The battles between Lee and Grant in the Wilderness and at Spottsylvania Courthouse, between the 4th and 13th of May, were the fiercest ever seen on this continent. The battle of the 12th was the most terrible of all. The Federals began the attack before daybreak, and overwhelmed and captured a large portion of Gen.
Southwest (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
e deeper solemnity, inasmuch as the people felt that they were on the verge of tremendous battles. Most of us, said a chaplain in General Lee's army, have made up our minds that the spring campaign here will open with the most desperate clash of arms that freedom ever cost on this continent. The chaplain's words were true. In front of General Lee the Federals were gathering in immense strength. At Dalton, Ga., they massed their finest Western army against Gen. Johnston. In the far Southwest General Banks had a heavy force, but he was met and driven back by the Confederates under General Kirby Smith. And now from the soldiers standing in the very front of death there came a solemn warning against the frivolities in which many engaged in our afflicted land. From the Christian Association of the First regiment of Virginia artillery an appeal was sent forth against the gayety and pleasure-seeking of the times. These faithful soldiers of Christ and of their country said:
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
writer said: It is wonderful to see with what patience our soldiers bear up under trials and hardships. I attribute this in part to the great religious change in our army. Twelve months after this revolution commenced a more ungodly set of men could scarcely be found than the Confederate army. Now the utterance of oaths is seldom, and religious songs and expressions of gratitude to God are heard from every quarter. Our army seems to be impressed with a high sense of an overruling Providence. They have become Christian patriots and have a sacred object to accomplish — an object dearer to them than life. They have also perfect confidence in their commanders. Such an army may be temporarily overpowered by vastly superior numbers, but they never can be conquered. In the battles of this season thousands of godly men cheerfully gave up their lives for the cause of the South. The death of Maj. James M. Campbell, of the 47th Alabama, and a minister of the Alabama Conference, M
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
determined effort to flank Gen. Johnston by a movement on Resaca; but the sagacious Confederate silently moved the mass of his army, and the Federals found more work on hand than they were able to do. To aid Grant in his movement from the line of the Rappahannock a heavy Federal force was concentrated on James river between Richmond and Petersburg, which was held in check by Gen. Beauregard, who had come up from Charleston, S. C. Gen. Banks was at the head of a large Federal army in Louisiana, but he was almost as unfortunate there as lie had been in the Valley of Virginia earlier in the war. The battles between Lee and Grant in the Wilderness and at Spottsylvania Courthouse, between the 4th and 13th of May, were the fiercest ever seen on this continent. The battle of the 12th was the most terrible of all. The Federals began the attack before daybreak, and overwhelmed and captured a large portion of Gen. Edward Johnson's division. But this gain only aroused the Confederate
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ame time that this bloody work was going on in Virginia the like scenes were enacted in Georgia. Here the movement was towards Richmond, there towards Atlanta. General Sherman made a determined effort to flank Gen. Johnston by a movement on Resaca; but the sagacious Confederate silently moved the mass of his army, and the Federals found more work on hand than they were able to do. To aid Grant in his movement from the line of the Rappahannock a heavy Federal force was concentrated on James river between Richmond and Petersburg, which was held in check by Gen. Beauregard, who had come up from Charleston, S. C. Gen. Banks was at the head of a large Federal army in Louisiana, but he was almost as unfortunate there as lie had been in the Valley of Virginia earlier in the war. The battles between Lee and Grant in the Wilderness and at Spottsylvania Courthouse, between the 4th and 13th of May, were the fiercest ever seen on this continent. The battle of the 12th was the most ter
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
and Gen. Jenkins were killed, and Generals Longstreet, Stafford, and Pegram were wounded, besides many other officers of lower grade and a vast number of private soldiers. Among the leading officers lost by the Federals was Gen. Wadsworth. At the same time that this bloody work was going on in Virginia the like scenes were enacted in Georgia. Here the movement was towards Richmond, there towards Atlanta. General Sherman made a determined effort to flank Gen. Johnston by a movement on Resaca; but the sagacious Confederate silently moved the mass of his army, and the Federals found more work on hand than they were able to do. To aid Grant in his movement from the line of the Rappahannock a heavy Federal force was concentrated on James river between Richmond and Petersburg, which was held in check by Gen. Beauregard, who had come up from Charleston, S. C. Gen. Banks was at the head of a large Federal army in Louisiana, but he was almost as unfortunate there as lie had been i
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
es of war. The devotion of the Southern people generally to the cause for which we battled for four years, and their cheerfulness in dividing almost the last loaf with the soldiers, are worthy of permanent record. Rev. Wm. H. Stewart, of Thomas' (Georgia) brigade, pays a well-merited tribute to the people of the Valley of Virginia who felt the heavy hand of war: Let me say something about the affectionate liberality of these Valley Virginians toward our dear soldiers. They have had Jackson's army quartered here, and Shields' and Fremont's. They have had sheep, hogs, cows, horses, and negroes, stolen, and their timber destroyed; and yet their love of country and care for soldiers is unabated. Still they give their milk and butter and lodging, and even board in some instances, to the soldiers free of charge. Some-of them are known to practice self-denial that they may have more to spare to the soldiers. The dear brother and sister Peel, with whom I board, give freely at all
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