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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
nt from one hill-top the smoke of 14 distilleries. One of the Richmond papers declared that a single distiller in that city made at one period of the war a profit of $4,000 a day. In Augusta county, Va., it was estimated that 50,000 bushels of grain were consumed monthly by the distilleries in operation there. A writer on this subject estimated that in the second year of the war 1,600 barrels, or 64,000 gallons of ardent spirits, of the worst sort, were daily manufactured in the Confederate States. Men who flourish and grow rich in such business forget the counsel of Lord Bacon, to seek only such gains as they can get justly, use soberly. distribute cheerfully, and leave contentedly. The temptation to drink in the army was very strong; men were cast down in spirit, away from home, wife, children, mothers and sisters, all that makes life dear. Many that ventured to drink at all under such circumstances found it hard to avoid excesses. But this evil was not confined to
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n, enough to furnish 600 families with food for the same period. While the commissioners, appointed by the court of that county to procure grain to feed the families of soldiers, could not purchase enough for that purpose, the smoke of fifty distilleries darkened the air; meanwhile, the cries of the poor mothers and helpless children went up in vain for bread. The same was the case in other States. In one District in South Carolina 150 distilleries were in operation. A gentleman in North Carolina said he could count from one hill-top the smoke of 14 distilleries. One of the Richmond papers declared that a single distiller in that city made at one period of the war a profit of $4,000 a day. In Augusta county, Va., it was estimated that 50,000 bushels of grain were consumed monthly by the distilleries in operation there. A writer on this subject estimated that in the second year of the war 1,600 barrels, or 64,000 gallons of ardent spirits, of the worst sort, were daily manu
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
revalence of vice,--drunkenness and profanity in our camps — is attributable to the officers themselves. By far the larger number of the officers of our Southern army are both profane and hard drinkers, where they are not drunkards. Another says: There is an appalling amount of drunkenness in our army. More among the officers than the men. This evil is now on the increase. A surgeon writing from the army says: I was greatly astonished to find soldiers in Virginia whom I had known in Georgia as sober, discreet citizens-members of the different churches — some deacons, and official members-even preachers, in the daily and constant habit of drinking whiskey for their health. An officer who had visited many portions of the army gave it as his opinion that with the exception of the reverse at Fort Donelson, we were defeated not by the Federals but by whiskey. A distinguished General is said to have remarked that if the South is overthrown, the epitaph should be Died of Whiske
East India (search for this): chapter 4
era, than other regiments. 3. That when attacked by any of these diseases their recovery is much more certain and speedy. 4. That they are much more readily aroused from the effects of concussions and severe wounds, and are far less liable to lockjaw, or mortification after wounds. 5. That only about six in the temperance regiments die, from all causes, to ten of the other regiments. These facts were collected from various fields of observation: Africa, Canada, Greenland, the East Indies, West Indies, and the Crimea. Robert Southey wrote the following to a kinsman, a lieutenant in the British Army: General Peche, an East Indian officer here, told me that in India the officers who were looking out for preferment, and who kept lists of all above them, always marked those who drank any spirits on a morning with an X, and reckoned them for nothing. One day, said he, when we were about to march at day-break, I and Captain----were in my tent, and we saw a German of
Israel (Israel) (search for this): chapter 4
r of our war-stricken, but unfaltering army, like a dreadful portent, the extortioners sat, croaking day and night their horse-leech cry, Give! Give! All classes, all trades, all professions, and both sexes alas! seemed infected by the foul contagion. So universal was the practice of cutting out the pound of flesh, that whenever an exception occurred it was thought worthy of special notice in all the public prints, and was referred to in the pulpits as an instance of one, at least, in Israel who had not bowed the knee to Baal. This cursed lust of gain, this Shylock exaction, more than all things else, embarrassed the Government, impaired public credit, depreciated the currency, caused great distress among the poorer classes, sowed the seeds of disaffection broadcast over the land, and finally broke the spirit of the people and the army. The pitiful fallacy about the inexorable laws of trade, which some, retaining a slight degree of sensitiveness, plead as an apology for ex
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 4
atisms, jaundice, and cholera, than other regiments. 3. That when attacked by any of these diseases their recovery is much more certain and speedy. 4. That they are much more readily aroused from the effects of concussions and severe wounds, and are far less liable to lockjaw, or mortification after wounds. 5. That only about six in the temperance regiments die, from all causes, to ten of the other regiments. These facts were collected from various fields of observation: Africa, Canada, Greenland, the East Indies, West Indies, and the Crimea. Robert Southey wrote the following to a kinsman, a lieutenant in the British Army: General Peche, an East Indian officer here, told me that in India the officers who were looking out for preferment, and who kept lists of all above them, always marked those who drank any spirits on a morning with an X, and reckoned them for nothing. One day, said he, when we were about to march at day-break, I and Captain----were in my tent
West Indies (search for this): chapter 4
er regiments. 3. That when attacked by any of these diseases their recovery is much more certain and speedy. 4. That they are much more readily aroused from the effects of concussions and severe wounds, and are far less liable to lockjaw, or mortification after wounds. 5. That only about six in the temperance regiments die, from all causes, to ten of the other regiments. These facts were collected from various fields of observation: Africa, Canada, Greenland, the East Indies, West Indies, and the Crimea. Robert Southey wrote the following to a kinsman, a lieutenant in the British Army: General Peche, an East Indian officer here, told me that in India the officers who were looking out for preferment, and who kept lists of all above them, always marked those who drank any spirits on a morning with an X, and reckoned them for nothing. One day, said he, when we were about to march at day-break, I and Captain----were in my tent, and we saw a German of our regiment.
Augusta county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ose, the smoke of fifty distilleries darkened the air; meanwhile, the cries of the poor mothers and helpless children went up in vain for bread. The same was the case in other States. In one District in South Carolina 150 distilleries were in operation. A gentleman in North Carolina said he could count from one hill-top the smoke of 14 distilleries. One of the Richmond papers declared that a single distiller in that city made at one period of the war a profit of $4,000 a day. In Augusta county, Va., it was estimated that 50,000 bushels of grain were consumed monthly by the distilleries in operation there. A writer on this subject estimated that in the second year of the war 1,600 barrels, or 64,000 gallons of ardent spirits, of the worst sort, were daily manufactured in the Confederate States. Men who flourish and grow rich in such business forget the counsel of Lord Bacon, to seek only such gains as they can get justly, use soberly. distribute cheerfully, and leave con
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ng the officers than the men. This evil is now on the increase. A surgeon writing from the army says: I was greatly astonished to find soldiers in Virginia whom I had known in Georgia as sober, discreet citizens-members of the different churches — some deacons, and official members-even preachers, in the daily and constant habit of drinking whiskey for their health. An officer who had visited many portions of the army gave it as his opinion that with the exception of the reverse at Fort Donelson, we were defeated not by the Federals but by whiskey. A distinguished General is said to have remarked that if the South is overthrown, the epitaph should be Died of Whiskey. This was one of the giant evils. Hundreds all over the land, moved by an unholy desire for gain, engaged in the manufacture of ardent spirits. It was estimated that in one county in Virginia, and that not one of the largest, the distillers, in one year, consumed 31,000 bushels of grain, enough to furnish 60
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
rgest, the distillers, in one year, consumed 31,000 bushels of grain, enough to furnish 600 families with food for the same period. While the commissioners, appointed by the court of that county to procure grain to feed the families of soldiers, could not purchase enough for that purpose, the smoke of fifty distilleries darkened the air; meanwhile, the cries of the poor mothers and helpless children went up in vain for bread. The same was the case in other States. In one District in South Carolina 150 distilleries were in operation. A gentleman in North Carolina said he could count from one hill-top the smoke of 14 distilleries. One of the Richmond papers declared that a single distiller in that city made at one period of the war a profit of $4,000 a day. In Augusta county, Va., it was estimated that 50,000 bushels of grain were consumed monthly by the distilleries in operation there. A writer on this subject estimated that in the second year of the war 1,600 barrels, or 6
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