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West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
thoughtless they are in camp, they are all glad to see the chaplain when they are sick; and I have yet to meet with the first instance of any other than the most respectful and reverent attention. I think I never occupied a field that afforded an equal opportunity for usefulness. The soldiers eagerly read everything that was put in their hands in the camp; and often sent appeals like the following, accompanied with a donation taken out of their scanty pay: The soldiers here (in Western Virginia) are starving for reading matter. They will read anything. I frequently see a piece of newspaper, no larger than my hand, going the rounds among them. If the bread of life were now offered them through the printed page, how readily they might be led to Christ. From Culpeper Court-house a pious lady wrote of her labors among the sick and wounded: The poor soldiers here are really begging for something to read. This is true especially of the wounded. Pray that the divine blessing ma
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
dier is supplied with the Word of Life. To this gentleman the chaplain of the 15th South Carolina regiment sent an encouraging report of the state of religion in his regiment: The Testaments you sent to me were eagerly sought after by the men, many coming to me long after they were all distributed, and were much disappointed at not receiving one. Could you send us some more they would be thankfully received and faithfully distributed. As almost all the men lost their Bibles on Hilton Head, our regiment is perhaps the most destitute on the coast. I am happy to say there is much religious feeling pervading our regiment, and our nightly prayer-meetings are well attended, and I hope ere long the Lord will bless us with an outpouring of his Holy Spirit. To the same the Lieutenant-Colonel of the 10th South Carolina regiment wrote: I would be glad if you will supply the regiment to which I am attached with the Scriptures, as I see by the papers that you are engaged in t
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ed to order that son, to be an example of devoted service and of sacrifice. 0, God! Thou gavest him and thou took him away. What a son, what a sacrifice! I parted from him saying, My son, fight the enemy close. He replied, I think I will, with a smile. He fought and watched and led, and led again, into action — was marked, fell with four balls piercing his precious form-cheered on to action as they bore him off, and died smiling, calm, composed, and grandly. Captain Coles, of Charlottesville, Va., a noble young soldier, was also among the killed. In the midst of the fight, it is said that a gallant officer rode up to his superior and asked for reinforcements, who, in reply, assured him that it was madness to contend with a mere handful of men against such numbers. On receiving this answer, he sat down for a moment and cried bitterly, then taking his sword, he broke it in pieces, mounted his horse, and rode off. The struggle at Fort Donelson was one of the most terrific i
Sharon (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
speaks louder and longer than victories on the battle-field, and is owing greatly, I must add, to our regimental officers, who enjoin such conduct by precept and encourage it by example. No embargo is laid upon our religious operations. The soldiers are accessible, and the officers co-operate with the chaplain. It is not unusual for the chaplain to receive several visits during the day from men desirous of having religious services in their tents at night. How gratifying that the rose of Sharon blooms under the war-cloud that overhangs us and scatters its fragrance through our encampment! Scarcely anything is more pleasing than to note the influence of religion on the hearts of our soldiers in prompting them to every good work. Though in the army toiling, fighting, suffering, their hearts were responsive to all the calls of the Church of God. How noble are the following words from one of them: It has been many a day since I have had the pleasure of looking in upon my pleas
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ntion of the soldiers. Along the Potomac, where the Army of Northern Virginia lay for the autumn and early part of the winter, religious services were held with encouraging signs. Rev. Joseph Cross, D. D., chaplain of the Walker Legion from Tennessee, writing of his labors, says: It is interesting to see how they flock to our nightly prayer-meetings, frequently in greater numbers than your Sabbath congregations in some of your city churches. I preach to them twice on the Lord's day, om over the fair prospects with which the first year of the war had just closed. First came the disaster at Fishing Creek, in Kentucky; then at Roanoke Island, in North Carolina; Fort Henry, and Fort Donelson, which guarded the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, fell in quick succession before the overwhelming forces of the Federals; Columbus, in Kentucky, was given up, Nashville was evacuated in the midst of dismay and confusion, and the remains of the Southern army retired southward. In al
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
entucky; then at Roanoke Island, in North Carolina; Fort Henry, and Fort Donelson, which guarded the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, fell in quick succession before the overwhelming forces of the Federals; Columbus, in Kentucky, was given up, Nashville was evacuated in the midst of dismay and confusion, and the remains of the Southern army retired southward. In all these battles there were instances of that high Christian courage which became the leading characteristic of the Southern soldill next day. Like his brother, seven months before; like his sister, seven days after; like the little one to whom he had given his name, he was to die on the Sabbath, with the calm of the eternal Sabbath filling his breast. He was carried to Nashville and tenderly nursed by faithful men. Only two incidents of his dying hours have reached us. Calling for one of his manuscript books, he took his pencil and, with a trembling hand, feebly wrote these words, Feb. 16, 1862, Sunday. I die content
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
he pulpit, and by the religious, and, indeed, by the secular press, to give themselves to fasting, prayer, humiliation, and self-examination in earnest. We call upon the ministry to stand up bravely in their place and to rebuke every form of sin. God, whose messengers they are, adds the solemn and terrible sanctions of his judgments to the word of his inspiration with which they are commissioned to arouse the dormant consciences of the people. When these thunders of the pulpit and of Providence combine, the deafest ear must hear, the most stupefied soul must arouse from its slumbers. Tell the people of their sins. Lift up the voice and spare not. Let Jeremiah teach the prophet of the Most High how to denounce sin, and Isaiah how to promise good to the repentant sinner. Give no place to worldliness in the Church. Teach the profane swearer, the Sabbath-breaker, the licentious, the intemperate, that they are the real enemies of their country, because they have made God angry w
Fishing Creek (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ke me more sensible of my accountability to him for the smallest talents entrusted to my care. As we advance in the narrative, we shall meet with repeated instances of the noblest self-denial and generosity on the part of our soldiers. A little matter mid-winter this year, a series of disasters occurred to our arms, which chilled the hearts of the people, and cast a gloom over the fair prospects with which the first year of the war had just closed. First came the disaster at Fishing Creek, in Kentucky; then at Roanoke Island, in North Carolina; Fort Henry, and Fort Donelson, which guarded the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, fell in quick succession before the overwhelming forces of the Federals; Columbus, in Kentucky, was given up, Nashville was evacuated in the midst of dismay and confusion, and the remains of the Southern army retired southward. In all these battles there were instances of that high Christian courage which became the leading characteristic of the Southern
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
hilled the hearts of the people, and cast a gloom over the fair prospects with which the first year of the war had just closed. First came the disaster at Fishing Creek, in Kentucky; then at Roanoke Island, in North Carolina; Fort Henry, and Fort Donelson, which guarded the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, fell in quick succession before the overwhelming forces of the Federals; Columbus, in Kentucky, was given up, Nashville was evacuated in the midst of dismay and confusion, and the remains owas madness to contend with a mere handful of men against such numbers. On receiving this answer, he sat down for a moment and cried bitterly, then taking his sword, he broke it in pieces, mounted his horse, and rode off. The struggle at Fort Donelson was one of the most terrific in the annals of war. The snow, says an eyewitness, lay upon the ground to the depth of three inches-soon to be the pall of the bridegroom death to many a brave fellow-and a cold, blinding sleet came slanting down
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Among the cheering signs of good among the soldiers was their earnest desire to procure Bibles and Testaments, or any part, indeed, of the Word of God. In the close of the winter, Rev. E. A. Bolles, General Agent of the Bible Societies in South Carolina, said, in speaking of his work: Three months ago I commenced the work of distribution among the soldiers on our coast under the auspices of the Executive Committee of the South Carolina Bible Convention.. During this time several thousaSouth Carolina Bible Convention.. During this time several thousand copies of the Scriptures have been given away to needy and grateful soldiers, and thousands of copies are yet needed to meet the demand. I may safely say that twenty thousand copies are needed for distribution among the soldiers on the coast. I therefore earnestly appeal to the benevolent for funds to procure the Scriptures, so that the good work so successfully begun may be continued until every destitute soldier is supplied with the Word of Life. To this gentleman the chaplain of the
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