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City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ngs of the men was something pathetic in itself, but it was never morbid, never unwise, never derived from her own shock at the sight, always practical and healthy. Miss Woolsey remained in the service through the war, a part of the time in charge of hospitals, but during Grant's great campaign of the spring, summer, and autumn of 1864, she was most effectively engaged at the front, or rather at the great depots for the wounded, at Belle Plain, Port Royal, Fredericksburg, White House, and City Point. Miss Jane S. Woolsey, also served in general hospitals as lady superintendent until the close of the war, and afterward transferred her efforts to the work among the Freedmen at Richmond, Virginia. A cousin of these ladies, Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, daughter of President Woolsey of Yale College, was also engaged during the greater part of the war in hospital and other philanthropic labors for the soldiers. She was for ten months assistant superintendent of the Portsmouth Grove General Ho
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
prise and pleasure to find himself thought of; so, in a pleased, childlike way, he talked about it till midnight, the attendant told me, as long as he spoke of anything; for at midnight the change came, and from that time he only thought of the old days before he was a soldier, when he sang hymns in his father's church. He sang them now again in a clear, sweet voice. Lord, have mercy upon me; and then songs without words — a sort of low intoning. His father was a Lutheran clergyman in South Carolina, one of the rebels told us in the morning, when we went into the tent, to find him sliding out of our care. All day long we watched him,times fighting his battles over, often singing his Lutheran chants, till, in at the tent-door, close to which he lay, looked a rebel soldier, just arrived with other prisoners. He started when he saw the lieutenant, and quickly kneeling down by him, called, Henry! Henry! But Henry was looking at some one a great way off, and could not hear him. Do y
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
nding a soldier among so many, sent in so many different directions; but we helped them as we could, and started them on their journey the next morning, back on their track, to use their common sense and Yankee privilege of questioning. A week after, Mrs.-- had a letter full of gratitude, and saying that the husband was found and secured for home. That same night we had had in our tents two fathers, with their wounded sons, and a nice old German mother with her boy. She had come in from Wisconsin, and brought with her a patchwork bed-quilt for her son, thinking he might have lost his blanket; and there he laid all covered up in his quilt, looking so homelike, and feeling so, too, no doubt, with his good old mother close at his side. She seemed bright and happy,--had three sons in the Army,--one had been killed,--this one wounded; yet she was so pleased with the tents, and the care she saw taken there of the soldiers, that, while taking her tea from a barrel-head as table, she said
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ough, certainly, they were not in your minds when you packed your barrels and boxes. The clothing we reserved for our own men, except now and then when a shivering rebel needed it; but in feeding them we could make no distinctions. Our three weeks were coming to an end; the work of transporting the wounded was nearly over; twice daily we had filled and emptied our tents, and twice fed the trains before the long journey. The men came in slowly at the last,--a lieutenant, all the way from Oregon, being among the very latest. He came down from the corps hospitals (now greatly improved), having lost one foot, poor fellow, dressed in a full suit of the Commission's cotton clothes, just as bright and as cheerful as the first man, and all the men that we received had been. We never heard a complaint. Would he like a little nice soup? Well, no, thank you, ma'am; hesitating and polite. You have a long ride before you, and had better take a little; I'll just bring it and you can try.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
good, now; -- I'll take some of that ; -- worth a penny a sniff; that kinder gives one life; --and so on, all round the tents, as we tipped the bottles up on the clean handkerchiefs some one had sent, and when they were gone, over squares of cotton, on which the perfume took the place of hem,--just as good, ma'am. We varied our dinners with custard and baked rice puddings, scrambled eggs, codfish hash, corn-starch, and always as much soft bread, tea, coffee, or milk as they wanted. Two Massachusetts boys I especially remember for the satisfaction with which they ate their pudding. I carried a second plateful up to the cars, after they had been put in, and fed one of them till he was sure he had had enough. Young fellows they were, lying side by side, one with a right and one with a left arm gone. The Gettysburg women were kind and faithful to the wounded and their friends, and the town was full to overflowing of both. The first day, when Mrs.-- and I reached the place, we lite
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
r have dreamt of it. Her pity for the sufferings of the men was something pathetic in itself, but it was never morbid, never unwise, never derived from her own shock at the sight, always practical and healthy. Miss Woolsey remained in the service through the war, a part of the time in charge of hospitals, but during Grant's great campaign of the spring, summer, and autumn of 1864, she was most effectively engaged at the front, or rather at the great depots for the wounded, at Belle Plain, Port Royal, Fredericksburg, White House, and City Point. Miss Jane S. Woolsey, also served in general hospitals as lady superintendent until the close of the war, and afterward transferred her efforts to the work among the Freedmen at Richmond, Virginia. A cousin of these ladies, Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, daughter of President Woolsey of Yale College, was also engaged during the greater part of the war in hospital and other philanthropic labors for the soldiers. She was for ten months assistant supe
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
n its strength, Tell her I love her. Late one afternoon, too late for the cars, a train of ambulances arrived at our Lodge with over one hundred wounded rebels, to be cared for through the night. Only one among them seemed too weak and faint to take anything. He was badly hurt, and failing. I went to him after his wound was dressed, and found him lying on his blanket stretched over the straw,--a fair-haired, blue-eyed young lieutenant, with a face innocent enough for one of our own New England boys. I could not think of him as a rebel; he was too near heaven for that. He wanted nothing,had not been willing to eat for days, his comrades said; but I coaxed him to try a little milk gruel, made nicely with lemon and brandy; and one of the satisfactions of our three weeks is the remembrance of the empty cup I took away afterward, and his perfect enjoyment of that supper. It was so good, the best thing he had had since he was wounded, --and he thanked me so much, and talked about
Canandaigua (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ds, cherry brandy, etc. Over the kitchen, and over this small supply-tent, we women rather reigned, and filled up our wants by requisition on the Commission's depot. By this time there had arrived a delegation of just the right kind from Canandaigua, New York, with surgeons' dressers and attendants, bringing a first-rate supply of necessities and comforts for the wounded, which they handed over to the Commission. Twice a day the trains left for Baltimore or Harrisburg, and twice a day we fjelly on the butter: how good it all was, and how lucky we felt ourselves in having the immense satisfaction of distributing these things, which all of you, hard at work in villages and cities, were getting ready and sending off, in faith. Canandaigua sent cologne with its other supplies, which went right to the noses and hearts of the men. That is good, now; -- I'll take some of that ; -- worth a penny a sniff; that kinder gives one life; --and so on, all round the tents, as we tipped the
Dutch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
r the train,-- Boys, here's a man who never saw a rebel in his life, and wants to look at you; and there he stood with his mouth wide open, and there they lay in rows, laughing at him, stupid old Dutchman. And why haven't you seen a rebel? Mrs. said; why didn't you take your gun and help to drive them out of your town? A feller might'er got hit! --which reply was quite too much for the rebels; they roared with laughter at him, up and down the tent. One woman we saw, who was by no means Dutch, and whose pluck helped to redeem the other sex. She lived in a little house close up by the field where the hardest fighting was done,--a red-cheeked, strong, country girl. Were you frightened when the shells began flying? Well, no. You see we was all a-baking bread around here for the soldiers, and had our dough a-rising. The neighbors they ran into their cellars, but I couldn't leave my bread. When the first shell came in at the window and crashed through the room, an officer came a
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ul nursing of the sick and wounded of her husband's regiment poem addressed to her by a soldier her encouragement and assistance to the women nurses appointed by Miss Dix Mrs. Robert S. Howland her labors in the hospitals and at the Metropolitan Sanitary Fair her early death from over-exertion in connection with the Fair her poetical contributions to the national cause in the Hospital Miss Georgiana M. Woolsey labors on Hospital Transports at Portsmouth Grove Hospital after Chancellorsville her work at Gettysburg with her mother three weeks at Gettysburg the approach to the battle-field the Sanitary Commission's Lodge near the railroad depot the supply tent crutches supplying rebels and Union men alike dressing wounds on dress parade bread with butter on it and jelly on the butter worth a penny a sniff the Gettysburg women the Gettysburg farmers had never seen a rebel a feller might'er got hit I couldn't leave my bread the dying soldiers te
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