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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2.

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st means of information upon which to form an accurate judgment, were mistaken in their estimate of the crisis precipitated upon the country in April, 1861, and the duration of its existence. It was not until after the first battle of Bull Run in July, that the Washington authorities began fully to comprehend the real magnitude of affairs, and to adopt measures in correspondence with them. We believe that these pages will show that in the little councils of the interior towns there was a mor volunteers which each place had furnished; as it was understood that if a draft should take place the men already furnished were to be taken into consideration, and allowances made. Accordingly, soon after the receipt of the President's calls of July and August, a general order was issued by the AdjutantGen-eral of the Commonwealth, with the approval of Governor Andrew, requesting the Mayor of each city, and the Selectmen of each town, to make a sworn return within a specified time of the men
efore they were forwarded by him to the War Department at Washington, and were published in the Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of Massachusetts for the year 1865. For a more full and detailed account of the men furnished by Massachusetts, see Volume I., page 667, and the reports of the Adjutant-General during the war. not including the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers, was$13,010,867.52 Being $10.74 for each inhabitant of the State, according to the census of 1865. The expense incurred by the Commonwealth for the same29,594,650.40 Which added to the sum expended by the cities and towns, makes a total of$42,605,517.92 Beiain, Massachusetts had, in proportion to its population, a larger percentage of women and other non-combatants than any other State in the Union. By the census of 1865 the females exceed in numbers the male population nearly fifty thousand, while in the Western States the male population exceeds that of the female. We had also a
Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. Often during the four years of the late civil war we were reminded of the words of Mr. Webster in a speech made by him in the Massachusetts Convention of 1820 for the amendment of the Constitution of this Commonwealth. They are as follows:— I would not be thought to be among those who underrate the value of military service. My heart beats, I trust, as responsive as any one's to a soldier's claim for honor or renown. It has ever been my opinion, however, that, while celebrating the military achievements of our countrymen in the Revolutionary contest, we have not always done equal justice to the merits and the sufferings of those who sustained, in their property and in their means of subsistence, the great burden of the war. Any one who has had occasion to be acquainted with the records of the New-England towns knows well how to estimate those merits and those sufferings. Nobler records of patriotism exist nowhere. Nowhere can ther
ouragement of recruiting, by adding to the amount allowed by law to be raised by taxation, and paid by the towns. The only objection to this practice was, that it gave undue advantage to the wealthy towns over their less fortunate neighbors; which we presume will be regarded as a legitimate advantage, and one which wealth always has over poverty. A word of explanation is proper here to account for the apparent discrepancy, which appears in the votes passed by many of the towns in the year 1862, in the amount of bounties paid to volunteers for three years service, and those for nine months service. In most of the towns the amounts were the same for both; in several of them a larger bounty was paid to the nine-months men than was paid to those for three years. The reason was this: On the 4th of July, 1862, the President issued a call for three hundred thousand volunteers for three years service, of which number Massachusetts was to furnish fifteen thousand. The towns immediately he
Assistant Provost-Marshal-General of Massachusetts, at the end of the war, before they were forwarded by him to the War Department at Washington, and were published in the Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of Massachusetts for the year 1865. For a more full and detailed account of the men furnished by Massachusetts, see Volume I., page 667, and the reports of the Adjutant-General during the war. By the very able report (House Doc. No. 7), made by Mr. Wentworth to the Legislature in 1867, and to which we have already referred, it is made to appear that the expenses incurred by the several cities and towns for bounties, recruiting, and other expenses growing out of the war, but not including the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers, was$13,010,867.52 Being $10.74 for each inhabitant of the State, according to the census of 1865. The expense incurred by the Commonwealth for the same29,594,650.40 Which added to the sum expended by the cities and towns, makes a
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1
ars,— making an aggregate of one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars. This large amount was made up of comparatively small sums. Only one was as large as a thousand dollars; the others varied from that down to ten cents. One day, while receiving contributions, immediately after the battle of Gettysburg, information was received of the fall of Vicksburg. The despatch containing the information was written on the blackboard, and was in these words:— Vicksburg has surrendered. U. S. Grant. Instantly shouts of joy went up from the assembled merchants. When the immediate excitement had subsided, they joined with uncovered heads in singing,— Praise God, from whom all blessings flow. At the conclusion of the hymn, some one remarked, Let us show our gratitude by our gifts. The persons present immediately crowded around the table of the committee; and offers of money were made faster than it could be received. Remarks like these were frequently made: This is my thank-off<
ver, to accomplish this desirable purpose; for towns, in their anxiety to furnish the number of men required of them, continued to pay bounties of their own, notwithstanding the large bounty offered by the State. This practice led to the passage of another act, by which cities and towns were prohibited from paying a larger bounty than one hundred and twenty-five dollars to a volunteer for three years service, which will explain to the reader the similarity of the votes passed by the towns in 1864, restricting the payment of bounty beyond that sum; it will also explain why some of them voted that the bounty thus provided should be paid in gold, which, though not a violation of the letter of the statute, certainly did not accord with its spirit and intention. Nor was this all. The towns, though restricted from paying a larger bounty than one hundred and twenty-five dollars, did not prevent citizens in their personal and private capacity from contributing of their own means to raise lar
ions to the recruiting expenses, &c., partly estimated5,550,293.82 Add contributions from fairs and all private sources, for all purposes connected with the war, as estimated2,500,000.00 Making a total of$21,407,393.71 Of the war expenses the towns now owe (Jan. 1, 1866) $8,554,112.95 Of the war expenses the State now (Jan. 1, 1866) owes16,379,484.32 Total$25,933,597.27 The amount exhibited, says the Report, undoubtedly falls below the actual expenditure. The Legislature of 1863, chapter 218, imposed a tax upon the several cities and towns, with a view of partially equalizing the expenses of the bounties previously paid by them. By this act, many of the towns were made debtors to the larger number; and they paid into the State treasury large sums to liquidate the debt thus created by statute. This transaction has, in many of the debtor towns, been disregarded in making their returns. Considerable sums have also been paid for interest, and additional expenses have
May, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1
aking a total of eight hundred and seventy-eight thousand nine hundred and ninety-one dollars and three cents ($878,991.03). These large sums were not received from fairs and other similar appliances, but were free — will offerings made by the people of the Commonwealth in response to appeals through the newspapers and by public addresses from members and friends of the cause. On three several occasions,—after the battle of Gettysburg in July, 1863, after the battle of the Wilderness in May, 1864, and after the fall of Richmond in April, 1865,—Mr. Demond, Mr. Edward S. Tobey, and some other members of the Army Committee of the Christian Commission, sat in the Merchants' Exchange, in Boston, and received the voluntary offerings of the people. No one was asked to give; every cent received was a free gift. And the result was as follows: on the first occasion, thirty-five thousand dollars; on the second, sixty thousand dollars; and on the third, thirty thousand dollars,— making an a
April, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1
e mention these facts to show how gentlemen in the highest official positions, and possessing the best means of information upon which to form an accurate judgment, were mistaken in their estimate of the crisis precipitated upon the country in April, 1861, and the duration of its existence. It was not until after the first battle of Bull Run in July, that the Washington authorities began fully to comprehend the real magnitude of affairs, and to adopt measures in correspondence with them. Wey service, and at the same time man the navy with seamen, for whom we obtained no credit or allowance whatever; and this injustice continued until July 4th, 1864, when an act passed Congress allowing the men in the navy, who had enlisted since April, 1861, to be counted into the contingent of a State to which they belonged, and in which they had enlisted. By this act of tardy justice Massachusetts was credited with twenty-two thousand three hundred and sixty men (22,360). See Volume I., pag
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