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Middlesex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ufacturing products of the county in 1870 was $83,102,442. The surface of the county is uneven, and the soil barren. It presents a great variety for the admiration of the patriot, scholar, farmer, mechanic, and painter. The population of Middlesex County in 1860 was 216,352; in 1865 it was 220,618, being an increase in five years of 4,266. The population in 1870 was 274,353, being an increase in five years of 53,735. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $135,458,009; in 1865 it was $155,324,723, being an increase in five years of $19,866,714. The number of men which Middlesex County furnished for the war, according to returns made by the selectmen of the towns and mayors of the cities in 1866—with the exception of Concord and West Cambridge, which do not appear to have made a return—was 28,646. West Cambridge and Concord furnished 524 men, which would make the aggregate, as reported, 29,170, which we believe to be at least three thousand more than was furnished; and there
Wayland (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
for the benefit of the soldiers. They held meetings weekly during the years of the war, and furnished great quantities of garments and useful hospital stores. Those which were acknowledged by the President were chiefly sent by the ladies. Wayland Incorporated April 10, 1780. Population in 1860, 1,188; in 1865, 1,138. Valuation in 1860, $564,758; in 1865, $658,073. The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John N. Sherman, Thomas J. Damon, William Baldwin; in 1863, John N. Sherman, Horatown during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $299.42; in 1862, $1,235.67; in 1863, $1,980.96; in 1864, $2,258.53; in 1865, $1,170.00. Total amount, $6,944.58. The ladies of Wayland, early in the war, organized a Soldiers' Aid Society, to manifest sympathy with those who are engaged in the service of our country, and to aid them to the utmost of our power. This society held frequent meetings, at which contributions were re
Everett, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
in its limits are Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. It is bounded north by New Hampshire, north-east by the county of Essex, south-east by Charles River, Boston Harbor, and Norfolk County, and west by the county of Worcester. Its rivers are the Merrimac, Charles, Mystic, Sudbury, Concord, and Nashua. Nearly every town is now intersected with a railroad. It contains fifty-four cities and towns. Since the war the town of Hudson, formed of parts of Marlborough and Stow, and the town of Everett, formed of a part of Maiden, have been incorporated as separate and distinct towns; the former, March 19, 1866, and the latter, March 9, 1870. Their war records form a part of that of the towns from which they were set off, and therefore do not appear distinct and separate in this volume. In old times the county seat was Concord; at the present time the courts of the county are held in Cambridge and Lowell. Middlesex is not only celebrated for its Revolutionary renown, but for containing
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 10: Middlesex County. Freetown, Bristol County, Mass.This county is the most populous in the Commonwealth, and next to Suffolk the most wealthy. It has a grand historic renown: within its limits are Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. It is bounded north by New Hampshire, north-east by the county of Essex, south-east by Charles River, Boston Harbor, and Norfolk County, and west by the county of Worcester. Its rivers are the Merrimac, Charles, Mystic, Sudbury, Concord, and Nashua. Nearly every town is now intersected with a railroad. It contains fifty-four cities and towns. Since the war the town of Hudson, formed of parts of Marlborough and Stow, and the town of Everett, formed of a part of Maiden, have been incorporated as separate and distinct towns; the former, March 19, 1866, and the latter, March 9, 1870. Their war records form a part of that of the towns from which they were set off, and therefore do not appear distinct and separate in this volume. In old t
Acton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
undred and sixty-one thousand six hundred and eighty-six dollars and three cents ($3,961,686.03). The following are the war records of the cities and towns:— Acton Incorporated July 3, 1735. Population in 1860, 1,726; in 1865, 1,660. Valuation in 1860, $821,401; in 1865, $854,719. The selectmen in 1861 and during the egiment, which passed through Baltimore on the 19th of April, 1861. now in the service of the United States, at which it was resolved, first, that the citizens of Acton, one and all, whatever may have been their former political opinions, will unite and rally around the Constitution and flag of our Union, and be ready to imitate twho fought and fell in defence of our liberties; fourth, that the town appropriate five thousand dollars for the benefit of the families of soldiers in the town of Acton, who are, or may hereafter be, engaged in the service of the United States. A committee was appointed to superintend the expenditure of the money; also, to purcha
Billerica (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s: In 1861, $22.00; in 1862, $234.00; in 1863, $599.08; in 1864, $641.44; in 1865, $400.00. Total amount, $1,896.52. Billerica Incorporated May 29, 1655. Population in 1860, 1,776; in 1865, 1,808. Valuation in 1860, $1,042,071; in 1865, $1,0uch articles of clothing and equipment, not furnished by the State, for the comfort and convenience of such citizens of Billerica as may volunteer in the military service of the United States, and that they look after and provide for the families oee appointed for that purpose reported the following resolutions, which were adopted:— Resolved, That the people of Billerica will respond to whatever call is made upon them, either for men or money, to the full extent of their resources. Res town for such sums of money as they might require for the purpose. The treasurer was directed to borrow the money. Billerica furnished one hundred and seventy-three men for the war, which was a surplus of four over and above all demands. Seven
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
town of Hudson, formed of parts of Marlborough and Stow, and the town of Everett, formed of a part of Maiden, have been incorporated as separate and distinct towns; the former, March 19, 1866, and the latter, March 9, 1870. Their war records form a part of that of the towns from which they were set off, and therefore do not appear distinct and separate in this volume. In old times the county seat was Concord; at the present time the courts of the county are held in Cambridge and Lowell. Middlesex is not only celebrated for its Revolutionary renown, but for containing Cambridge University, and the Navy Yard at Charlestown. Lowell and Waltham are well known for their cotton manufactures, as are Marlborough, Woburn, Natick, and other towns for the manufacture of shoes. The aggregate value of the agricultural and manufacturing products of the county in 1870 was $83,102,442. The surface of the county is uneven, and the soil barren. It presents a great variety for the admiration of th
Littleton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
social gatherings the solemn refrain rang through the merriments. Repeatedly cases containing the result of our labors of love were sent to private hospitals; but for the last years they were put into the hands of the Sanitary Commission. Littleton Incorporated Dec. 3, 1715. Population in 1860, 1,063; in 1865, 967. Valuation in 1860, $666,270; in 1865, $632,380. The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John F. Robbins, John Cutter, James A. Parker; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Joseph A. Prr, who in early manhood has laid his life upon the altar of his country, we pledge ourselves anew to that cause for which he so nobly gave his life. It was also voted that the clerk communicate the resolution to the family of the deceased. Littleton continued recruiting and paying bounties until the end of the war. The whole number of men furnished by the town for the war was one hundred and seventeen, which was a surplus of eighteen over and above all demands. Two were commissioned of
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ber 5th, Major-General Butler received a public reception on his return home after the capture of Fort Hatteras. September 10th, Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. On the 26th of November five thousand dollars, and on the 24th of December fifteen hundred dollars, were appropriated for the same purpose. 1862. January 3d. More money was appropriated for the families of volunteers. February 17th, One hundred guns were fired in honor of the capture of Fort Donelson. February 25th, A resolution passed allowing aid to be paid to the relatives and families of volunteers who are not included in the State law; also to volunteers who have enlisted and gone from the city. March 25th, Twenty-five thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. July 17th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the city; on the 22d ten dollars additional were a
Groton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
from that time till July, 1865. As the result of these labors one hundred and twenty boxes were forwarded to the army, filled with bandages, lint, under-clothing, and other necessaries and comforts for the sick and wounded in the hospitals. Groton Incorporated May 29, 1655. Population in 1860, 3,193; in 1865, 3,176. Valuation in 1860, $1,465,408; in 1865, $1,553,920. The selectmen in 1861 were Phinehas G. Prescott, William H. Harlow, Willard Torrey; in 1862 and 1863, Eliel Shumway,e voluntarily advanced to aid recruiting, which amounted in gross to upwards of six thousand dollars. J. M. Hollingsworth furnished two, and Eliel Shumway one representative recruit, for which they paid a bounty of one hundred dollars to each. Groton furnished four hundred men for the war, which was a surplus of forty-nine over and above all demands. Twenty-four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money raised and appropriated by the town for war purposes, exclusive of State aid
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