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fairs be instructed to make arrangements for a public reception to Company H, First Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and to cooperate with any other committee of the city which may unite in giving the veteran heroes a reception worthy of the city and which they so well merit; the expense of which to be charged to the appropriation for military purposes. 1865. April 10th, The joint standing committee on military affairs were directed to make arrangements for a public observance of the 14th instant, when the Flag of the Union was to be raised on Fort Sumter, by the ringing of bells, the firing of salutes, display of fireworks, and a public meeting in the evening, or such other demonstrations as the committee may deem proper. April 17th, A special meeting of the city council was held, by order of Eustace C. Fitz, mayor, who announced in fitting terms the death of President Lincoln by the hand of an assassin. The following preamble and resolutions were then adopted:— Whereas Go
o soldiers' families was organized as follows: Aldermen Thomas C. Amory, Otis Norcross, Francis Richards, Joseph F. Faul; councilmen Joseph Buckley, William Carpenter, John S. Pear, Sumner Crosby, F. H. Sprague; Charles J. McCarthy, paymaster; Timothy R. Page, relief clerk. June 23d, A vote of thanks was passed to Colonel Thomas Cass and the Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers for a present to the city of Boston of a Rebel flag, taken at the battle of Hanover Court House, Va., on the 27th ultimo. June 30th, A communication was received from Mayor Wightman recommending that a lot in Mount Hope Cemetery be set apart for the burial of soldiers; whereupon it was ordered that the trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery be authorized to select a suitable lot of not less than twelve hundred square feet, to be known as the Soldiers' Grave, to be specially appropriated and set apart for the burial of such persons as may die in the cause of their country in the existing war. July 14th, A communic
January 2nd (search for this): chapter 14
nd to take such steps for raising the quota of Boston as they may deem expedient. March 30th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow for recruiting purposes two hundred thousand dollars, and that a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars be paid each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the city. July 21st, The treasurer was authorized to borrow five hundred thousand dollars additional for the payment of bounties to volunteers and recruiting purposes. 1865. January 2d, The aldermen and two members of the common council from each ward were appointed to act through the year as The Soldiers-Relief Committee, to determine and pay the allowance of State aid to the families of volunteers as provided by law. January 9th, Aldermen Clapp, Tyler, and Dana, and Messrs. Warren, McLean, Darrow, Park, and Braman of the council, were appointed a committee to have charge of all matters relating to recruiting for the land and naval forces of the United States during th
January 5th (search for this): chapter 14
t means by which the large number of men the city was to furnish could be obtained. It does not appear that any differences of opinion prevailed among the members of the city government in regard to furnishing men, and making liberal provision for the families of volunteers, and for the sick and disabled soldiers who came back from service. During this year the Discharged Soldiers' Home in Springfield street was established, chiefly through the liberality of the city of Boston. 1863. January 5th, Ordered, that the aldermen and two members of the common council from each ward be a committee to determine and pay the amount of State aid allowed by law. January 26th, A joint committee to recruit volunteers to keep up the quota of the city was appointed. February 2d, The committee on relief of soldiers' families was authorized to afford aid to such extent as they may deem expedient; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. March 30th, The city-clerk was dire
January 9th (search for this): chapter 14
d each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the city. July 21st, The treasurer was authorized to borrow five hundred thousand dollars additional for the payment of bounties to volunteers and recruiting purposes. 1865. January 2d, The aldermen and two members of the common council from each ward were appointed to act through the year as The Soldiers-Relief Committee, to determine and pay the allowance of State aid to the families of volunteers as provided by law. January 9th, Aldermen Clapp, Tyler, and Dana, and Messrs. Warren, McLean, Darrow, Park, and Braman of the council, were appointed a committee to have charge of all matters relating to recruiting for the land and naval forces of the United States during the current year, the payment of bounties, and the revision of the enrollment lists in the several wards under the supervision of his honor the mayor. A joint committee was also appointed to provide suitably for returning regiments passing through Bos
January 11th (search for this): chapter 14
d to erect such a building as they may deem necessary to be used for recruiting purposes. Ordered, that State aid be paid to the families of soldiers who have been transferred to the invalid corps the same as before. November 16, The committee on public buildings was directed to prepare forthwith the ward-rooms for recruiting purposes. Nothing more of particular interest or importance appears to have been necessary on the part of the city in regard to the war during this year. 1864. January 11th, A joint committee of which Alderman Clapp was chairman was appointed to tender to the returning companies and regiments of New-England volunteers which arrive in Boston such hospitalities as they may deem expedient and necessary. This committee discharged its duties with great fidelity. Each regiment which passed through Boston was hospitably entertained with a good meal at Faneuil Hall. It was also ordered that the board of aldermen, with such as the common council may join, be a co
January 16th (search for this): chapter 14
Dana, and Messrs. Warren, McLean, Darrow, Park, and Braman of the council, were appointed a committee to have charge of all matters relating to recruiting for the land and naval forces of the United States during the current year, the payment of bounties, and the revision of the enrollment lists in the several wards under the supervision of his honor the mayor. A joint committee was also appointed to provide suitably for returning regiments passing through Boston, the same as last year. January 16th, Mayor Lincoln communicated in an eloquent message to the city council the death of the Hon. Edward Everett, and resolutions of respect and condolence were unanimously adopted. April 17th, The mayor communicated in a written message to the aldermen the assassination of President Lincoln, and the attempt to take the life of Secretary Seward. A series of appropriate resolutions were read and adopted, after which on motion of Alderman Dana the board adjourned. The foregoing is a brief b
January 26th (search for this): chapter 14
e city government in regard to furnishing men, and making liberal provision for the families of volunteers, and for the sick and disabled soldiers who came back from service. During this year the Discharged Soldiers' Home in Springfield street was established, chiefly through the liberality of the city of Boston. 1863. January 5th, Ordered, that the aldermen and two members of the common council from each ward be a committee to determine and pay the amount of State aid allowed by law. January 26th, A joint committee to recruit volunteers to keep up the quota of the city was appointed. February 2d, The committee on relief of soldiers' families was authorized to afford aid to such extent as they may deem expedient; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. March 30th, The city-clerk was directed to employ a suitable assistant to prepare a record of the soldiers who have enlisted for the quota of Boston. June 22, A committee was appointed with full powers to
January 27th (search for this): chapter 14
ent of State aid to soldiers' families, as provided by law, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow ten thousand dollars to pay the same. July 22d, A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the comfort and accommodation of the three-months companies and regiments on their arrival in Boston at the expiration of their terms of service. December 16th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-five thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families. 1862. January 27th, A long and able report was made in favor of a reorganization of the mode of paying State aid to soldiers' families, which was read and adopted. February 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-five thousand dollars for the payment of State aid. February 10th, It was ordered that Aldermen Rich, Hanson, and Henshaw, with such as the council may join, be a committee on military affairs to make provision for troops passing through the city, either to or from the seat of war, and t
February 2nd (search for this): chapter 14
ers, and for the sick and disabled soldiers who came back from service. During this year the Discharged Soldiers' Home in Springfield street was established, chiefly through the liberality of the city of Boston. 1863. January 5th, Ordered, that the aldermen and two members of the common council from each ward be a committee to determine and pay the amount of State aid allowed by law. January 26th, A joint committee to recruit volunteers to keep up the quota of the city was appointed. February 2d, The committee on relief of soldiers' families was authorized to afford aid to such extent as they may deem expedient; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. March 30th, The city-clerk was directed to employ a suitable assistant to prepare a record of the soldiers who have enlisted for the quota of Boston. June 22, A committee was appointed with full powers to tender the hospitalities of the city to the Forty-fourth, and other Boston regiments on their return
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